Beans

Beans

This page is an open source resource guide for beans. It is for growing and maintaining the most bio-diverse, delicious, and broadly applicable bean selection possible. It contains cultural considerations, planting guidelines, descriptions, and the best places we’ve found for purchasing the species we’ve listed. As part of the One Community Highest Good food component of global transformation, this page will continue to evolve indefinitely to contain maintenance and care tips, accessioning and plant breeding and sharing information as part of the One Community open source botanical garden model, and even recipe’s, preparations, and preservation methods used on the property.

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Beans 640 Meme

BEANS

(Click here for bean purchase details)

Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris and Phaseolus spp.)
snap, dry, and wax beans, One Community Beans come in several types which include snap, dry, and wax and their habits include bush and pole (climbing). Dry beans are threshed from the pods in the fall and stored for later use. Snap beans are eaten fresh cooked throughout the growing season and are also canned or pickled (some types of snap beans are also used as dry beans). Wax beans are used like snap beans, but have a different texture.
CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Beans are generally self-fertile
  • Rhizobial inoculation can help establishment
  • Bean plants fix nitrogen and are good companion plants
  • Beans are susceptible to several insect pests and diseases
  • Pole types are grown on supports or can form a living mulch
PLANTING GUIDELINES

Beans can be direct sown or set out as transplants. Plant in spring as soon as all danger of frost is past. It can help to pre-soak the beans overnight, but this is not necessary. Rhizobial inoculation can be helpful. Space the beans or transplant close enough so they will form a continuous canopy; for most types 12-18 inches apart.

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VIDEO COMING: Planting tutorial, followed by time lapse growth videos

SEE OUR HOW TO HELP AND/OR CROWDFUNDING CAMPAIGN PAGE IF YOU’D LIKE TO GET INVOLVED AND/OR SUPPORT ONE COMMUNITY’S DEVELOPMENT PROCESS.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Beans

Bolita beans, One Community
GB#1 :: Bolita Bean

Bolita Beans are bush type like Pinto beans but are much more flavorful, more digestible and cook much faster. They grow in pods 5 inches long with 5-6 large, light tan seeds and are very productive. These beans are an heirloom from northern New Mexico and were incorporated into much of the American Indian food traditions in the Four Corners region. With its high protein content and its general ease on the stomach, the Bolita bean became an important crop, although it often loses out to the more known Pinto bean in sales and cultivation.

Jacobs Cattle bean, One Community
GB#2 :: Jacob’s Cattle Bean

Jacob’s Cattle is a dry bean originally cultivated by the Passamaquoddy Native Americans in Maine that produces in 80-100 days. The seeds are red and white speckled with a larger red eye. They come from sturdy, 20 inch bush plants inside heavy oval pods and are shaped like a kidney bean, although slightly smaller. These beans are easy to digest and have a rich aroma. Used as a stewing and baking bean, Jacob’s Cattle absorbs most any flavors you add to it.

Joyce Fetterly's Bean, One Community
GB#3 :: Joyce Fetterly’s Red & White Bean

Joyce Fetterly’s Red and White bean is a rare variety that appears to be only grown by one family; this is one of the reasons, along with its versatility, that it was chosen here. It has large, round to oval seeds and is very good as snap or dry beans. This variety produces in 75 days.

Tongue of Fire Bean, One Community
GB#4 :: Tongue of Fire Bean

Tongue of Fire are high yield, fresh shell beans that produce in 75 days. They come in large (6-7 inch) pale green pods with vibrant red streaks and can be eaten as snap beans. Once shelled, the round, large beans themselves are also strikingly colored (red speckled on a cream background), and fade in color during the cooking process. The beans have a nutty, somewhat sweet taste, and retain their flavor whether fresh, frozen, or canned. The original stock seeds were collected at the southern tip of South America, in Tierra del Fuego.

McCaslan White Bean, One Community
GB#5 :: McCaslan White Bean

This bean is one of the oldest heirloom varieties and an old Southern favorite introduced in 1912 by the McCaslan family of Georgia. The vines produce prolifically throughout the growing season starting at 65-80 days. They are great dry, or as a snap bean. The McCaslan’s medium green pods reach eight inches long and are mealy, slightly flattened, and of superb quality; the seeds are ivory-white, oblong, and flat.

Kwintus Beans, One Community
GB#6 ::  Kwintus Bean

The Kwintus bean is a vigorous, flat-podded Italian pole bean formally called Early Riser. These stringless, tender, 7-9 inch pods contain meaty beans that keep their flavor longer than most other green bean varieties. This bean matures in 55 days as a snap bean and 90 days as a shell bean. Kwintus exhibit a delicious sweet bean flavor and can be grown almost anywhere because of their short growing season. They are a favorite among bean aficionados and are recommended as an all-around perfect bean.

Salvadoran Red Bean, One Community
GB#7 :: Salvadoran Red Bean

The Salvadoran Red bean is originally from a member of the Las Colinas cooperative of small coffee farmers near Tacuba in western El Salvador. The pods develop a pink hue as they mature and contain small red-pink seeds. They grow on vines that are very productive and will climb if given support. These delicious beans hold their beautiful color and shape under intense cooking, and also mash well.

santa maria pinquito bean, one community
 GB#8 :: Santa Maria Pinquito Bean

The Santa Maria Pinquito bean is an heirloom Hispanic variety brought to early colonial settlements in California. This very small plant produces 6-8 reddish seeds in 3 inch pods and matures in 75 days. Pinquito beans are prized for maintaining a firm, plump texture even when fully cooked. These beans are delicious and meaty and make excellent baked beans- it’s the perfect match for any barbecue, chili or even salad. The traditional Santa Maria-style barbecue wouldn’t be the same without them. It sets pods late in summer so plants may need to be pulled and hung under cover to dry.

Yin Yang Bean, One Community
 GB#9 :: Yin Yang Bean

Yin Yang are charming, round, black and white swirled heirloom beans, also known as Calypso. The distinctive black and white pattern emblazoned on the dried bean is a remarkable, three-dimensional depiction of the familiar Chinese symbol. Coming from sturdy, 15-18 inch plants these easy to grow beans come 4 to 5 per pod and produce in 80 days. The beans have a delicious mild flavor and add a fascinating presentation to any dish.

Zuni Shalako Bean, One Community
GB#10 :: Zuni Shalako Bean

Zuni Shalako are heirloom gold and white bush beans native to Southwestern United States and Mexico. They grow in 4.5 X ⅞ inch pods on viney, low growing spreading plants, producing in 100+ days. Zuni Shalako beans are perfect as dry beans in southwest dishes because of their ability to absorb flavors such as chile peppers. These beans are used in ceremony of late fall visitation of the Shalako Katchina for directional blessings of new dwellings in Zuni Pueblo.

We will also be growing the following additional beans:
Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) :: GB-C#1 – GB-C#12

1. Algarrobo 2. Amarillo del Norte 3. Amethyst 4. Bosnian Yellow 5. Brazil Little Black 6. Bulgarian Market 7. Caseknife 8. Choctaw 9. Iroquois Corn Bread 10. Montezuma Red 11. Pepa de Zapallo 12. PI 155212 (Paraguay)

Lima Bean (Phaseolus lunatus) :: GB-L#1 – GB-L#6

Phaseolus coccineus is a PERENNIAL growing to 3 m (9ft) by 1 m (3ft 3in) at a fast rate.

1. Calico 2. Hopi Gray 3. Hopi Red 4. Hopi Yellow 5. Pima Beige 6. Pima Orange

Runner Bean (Phaseolus coccineus) :: GB-R#1 – GB-R#2

Phaseolus lunatus is a PERENNIAL CLIMBER.

1. Aztec White 2. Tarahumara Bordal

Tepary Bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) :: GB-T#1 – GB-T#6

1. Big Fields White 2. Black 3. Blue Speckled 4. Brown Speckled 5. Cocopah Brown 6. Colonia Morelos Speckled

Bean Plant Material/Seed Providers:
Bean Purchase Details
REF # VEGETABLES VARIETY SOURCE QUANTITY UNIT COST TOTAL COST
GB#1 Bean:Common Bolita SSE 6 pkt. $4.00/pkt $24
GB#2 Bean:Common Jacob’s Cattle HMS 2 lbs 12.50/lb $25
GB#3 Bean:Common Joyce Fetterly’s SSE 6 pkt. $4.00/pkt $24
GB#4 Bean:Common Tongue of Fire SSE 6 pkt. $4.00/pkt $24
GB#5 Bean:Common McCaslan White SSE 6 pkt. $4.00/pkt $24
GB#6 Bean:Common Kwintus SSE 6 pkt. $4.00/pkt $24
GB#7 Bean:Common Salvadoran Red SSE 6 pkt. $4.00/pkt $24
GB#8 Bean:Common Santa Maria Pinquito SSE 6 pkt. $4.00/pkt $24
GB#9 Bean:Common Yin Yang SSE 6 pkt. $4.00/pkt $24
GB#10 Bean:Common Zuni Shalako SSE 6 pkt. $4.00/pkt $24
GB-C#1 Bean: Common Algarrobo SSE 3 pkt. $4.00/pkt $12
GB-C#2 Bean: Common Amarillo del Norte SSE 3 pkt. $4.00/pkt $12
GB-C#3 Bean: Common Amethyst SSE 3 pkt. $4.00/pkt $12
GB-C#4 Bean: Common Bosnian Yellow SSE 3 pkt. $4.00/pkt $12
GB-C#5 Bean: Common Brazil Little Black SSE 3 pkt. $4.00/pkt $12
GB-C#6 Bean: Common Bulgarian Market SSE 3 pkt. $4.00/pkt $12
GB-C#7 Bean: Common Caseknife SSE 3 pkt. $4.00/pkt $12
GB-C#8 Bean: Common Choctaw SSE 3 pkt. $4.00/pkt $12
GB-C#9 Bean: Common Iroquois Corn Bread SSE 3 pkt. $4.00/pkt $12
GB-C#10 Bean: Common Montezuma Red SSE 3 pkt. $4.00/pkt $12
GB-C#11 Bean: Common Pepa de Zapallo SSE 3 pkt. $4.00/pkt $12
GB-C#12 Bean: Common PI 155212 (Paraguay) SSE 3 pkt. $4.00/pkt $12
GB-L#1 Bean: Lima Calico NS/S 3 pkt. $3.00/pkt $12
GB-L#2 Bean: Lima Hopi Gray NS/S 3 pkt. $3.00/pkt $12
GB-L#3 Bean: Lima Hopi Red NS/S 3 pkt. $3.00/pkt $12
GB-L#4 Bean: Lima Hopi Yellow NS/S 3 pkt. $3.00/pkt $12
GB-L#5 Bean: Lima Pima Beige NS/S 3 pkt. $3.00/pkt $12
GB-L#6 Bean: Lima Pima Orange NS/S 3 pkt. $3.00/pkt $12
GB-R#1 Bean: Runner Aztec White NS/S 3 pkt. $3.00/pkt $12
GB-R#2 Bean: Runner Tarahumara Bordal NS/S 3 pkt. $3.00/pkt $12
GB-T#1 Bean: Tepary Big Fields White NS/S 3 pkt. $3.00/pkt $12
GB-T#2 Bean: Tepary Black Tepary NS/S 3 pkt. $3.00/pkt $12
GB-T#3 Bean: Tepary Blue Speckled NS/S 3 pkt. $3.00/pkt $12
GB-T#4 Bean: Tepary Brown Speckled NS/S 3 pkt. $3.00/pkt $12
GB-T#5 Bean: Tepary Cocopah Brown NS/S 3 pkt. $3.00/pkt $12
GB-T#6 Bean: Tepary Colonia Morelos Speckled NS/S 3 pkt. $3.00/pkt $12

 

OTHER BEAN RESOURCES

We are seeking awesome bean resources. If you know of one, please click here to share it with us so we can make this page better.

 

BEANS AS PART OF THE BOTANICAL GARDEN MODEL

This section will evolve to include accessioning and plant breeding and sharing information as part of the One Community open source botanical garden model.

 

BEAN PREPARATION, PRESERVATION, AND RECIPES

This section will evolve to include testimonials, recipe’s, preparations, and preservation methods used on the property first, and then later with additional information from other Highest Good collaborators and teacher/demonstration hubs

Bean Brownie, bean recipes, one community

Vegan Gluten Free Black Bean Brownie

Recipe courtesy of: Minimalist Baker


Total Time: 30 min
Prep: 5 min
Cook: 25 min
Yield: 12 Servings
Level: Easy

 

Ingredients

  • 1 15 oz. can (1 3/4 cups) black beans, well rinsed and drained
  • 2 large flax eggs
  • 3 T coconut oil, melted (or sub other oil of choice)
  • 3/4 cup cocoa powder (the higher quality the better)
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt (for veggies)
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • Heaping 1/2 cup raw sugar, slightly ground or pulsed in a food processor or coffee grinder for refined texture
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • Optional toppings: crush walnuts, pecans or semisweet chocolate chips

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Directions

Preheat Oven to 350° F.

  1. Lightly grease a 12-slot standard size muffin pan (not mini). Make sure you’ve rinsed and thoroughly drained your black beans at this point.
  2. Prepare flax egg by combining flax and water in the bowl of the food processor. Pulse a couple times and then let rest for a few minutes.
  3. Add remaining ingredients (besides walnuts or other toppings) and puree – about 3 minutes – scraping down sides as needed. You want it pretty smooth.
  4. If the batter appears too thick, add a Tbsp or two of water and pulse again. It should be slightly less thick than chocolate frosting but nowhere close to runny.
  5. Evenly distribute the batter into the muffin tin and smooth the tops with a spoon or your finger.
  6. Optional: Sprinkle with crushed walnuts, pecans or chocolate chips.
  7. Bake for 20-26 minutes or until the tops are dry and the edges start to pull away from the sides. I found mine took about 25.
  8. Remove from oven and let cool for 30 minutes before removing from pan. They will be tender, so remove gently with a fork. The insides are meant to be very fudgy, so don’t be concerned if they seem too moist – that’s the point. Plus, they’re vegan so it doesn’t really matter.
  9. Store in an airtight container for up to a few days. Refrigerate to keep longer.

Sauteed Garlic Broad Beans and Bacon with Coriander, Broad Bean Recipes, One Community

Sauteed Garlic Broad Beans
with Bacon & Coriander

Recipe courtesy of: Taste.com


Total Time: 35 min
Prep: 25 min
Cook: 10 min
Yield: 10 Servings
Level: Easy

 

Ingredients

  • 2 x 500g pkts frozen broad beans
  • 6 bacon rashers, rind removed, coarsely chopped
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh coriander

Directions

  1. Place the broad beans in a heatproof bowl. Cover with boiling water and set aside for 5 minutes or until thawed. Drain. Peel and discard the skins.

  2. Heat a large non-stick frying pan over high heat. Add the bacon and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes or until the bacon is crisp and golden.

  3. Add the broad beans and cook, stirring, for 3-4 minutes or until the beans are heated through. Stir in the coriander. Spoon the bean mixture into a serving bowl. Serve immediately.

Pea, Broad Bean and Edamame Bean Salad, One Community

Pea, Broad Bean & Edamame Salad

Recipe courtesy of: rachelbegun.com


Total Time: 35 min
Prep: 15 min
Cook: 20 min
Yield: 8 Servings
Level: Easy

 

Ingredients

  • 2.5kg unpodded broad beans, or 400g podded broad beans, fresh or frozen
  • 200g fresh or frozen peas
  • 400g frozen edamame beans
  • 8 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 lemons – the juice of 1 and grated zest of 2
  • 3 cloves of garlic, chopped
  • 2 tsp cumin powder
  • 2 tsp dry-fried cumin seeds
  • 2 mild red chilies, de-seeded and finely chopped
  • 1 small red pepper, cut into small chunks
  • a good handful of fresh coriander, chopped
  • a good handful of fresh mint, chopped
  • 20 black olives, roughly chopped

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Directions

  1. Pod the broad beans if necessary, and cook them in a large pan of boiling salted water for two minutes. Drain and rinse under running cold water for one minute. If the beans are large, slip off the skins. Set aside.
  2. Cook the peas in the same way as the broad beans, then drain and set aside. Put the edamame beans in a pan of cold water, bring to the boil and simmer for five minutes. Drain and rinse under running cold water for a minute.
  3. Put both lots of beans in a large, heavy-based frying-pan, adding the oil, lemon juice and zest, garlic, cumin powder and seeds, chilies, and red pepper.
  4. Cook over a low heat for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally and not allowing the beans to brown. Take off the heat, season with salt and pepper and allow to cool in the pan. Spoon the beans into a serving bowl with all the juices from the pan.
  5. Stir in the coriander, mint, and peas and sprinkle over the

Best Black Bean Burger, bean recipes, One Community

Best-Ever Black Bean Burger

Recipe courtesy of: The Talking Kitchen


Total Time: 28 min
Prep: 20 min
Cook: 8 min
Yield: 12-14 burgers
Level: Easy / Intermediate

 

 Ingredients

  • 1- 15 oz. can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 2 c. cooked quinoa, (~ 1 c. raw + 2 c. water + 1/2 tsp sea salt + 5 cloves garlic, minced)
  • 2 Tbsp olive or grapeseed oil
  • 1 shallot, diced
  • 1/2 red bell pepper, diced
  • 1/2 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt (for veggies)
  • 1/4 tsp smoked sea salt (for beans)
  • 1/2-1 c. panko bread crumbs
  • 1 c. cilantro leaves, loosely packed

Directions

  1. Begin by sautéing the bell pepper, cumin seeds, red pepper flakes, and shallot in 1/2 Tbsp of oil for a few mins, then add the garlic and sea salt, sauté for a minute or two more, turn off heat and set aside.
  2. In a food processor, add the beans, cooled veggies, paprika, and smoked salt. Pulse until just combined.
  3. Add the cooked quinoa and cilantro, again pulse until combined.
  4. Hand form into palm-sized burger patties.
  5. Refrigerate for at least 10 minutes.
  6. Remove from fridge, let cool for 5 minutes.
  7. Coat each side in panko bread crumbs, being sure to push down to adhere the breadcrumbs to the burger.
  8. Pan fry in remaining oil for 3 minutes on each side.
  9. Pan fry burger patty for under 5 minutes.

Lentil Artichoke Stew, One Community

Lentil Artichoke Stew

Recipe courtesy of: PCRM 


Total Time: 45 min
Prep: 15 min
Cook: 30 min
Yield: 6 servings
Level: Easy

 

 Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup vegetable broth
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 large garlic cloves, pressed or minced
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 cup dry (uncooked) red lentils (3 cups cooked)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 cups water
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Two 24-ounce cans chopped tomatoes (preferably fire-roasted), undrained, or 6 cups freshly chopped tomatoes plus 1 cup tomato juice
  • 1 1/2 cups quartered artichoke hearts (one 9-ounce frozen package or one 15-ounce can)
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper (optional)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, or to taste

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Directions

  1. Heat broth in a large saucepan.
  2. Add onion and sauté on medium heat for about 5 minutes, until golden.
  3. Add garlic, cumin, and coriander and cook for 2 minutes, stirring frequently.
  4. Add dried lentils, bay leaf, and water to pan and bring to a boil.
  5. Lower heat and add lemon juice, tomatoes and their liquid, artichokes, and crushed red pepper (if using).
  6. Simmer for about 20 minutes, until the lentils are tender.
  7. Remove and discard the bay leaf.
  8. Add salt and black pepper, or to taste.

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