Cob Village Header, Cob Village, Cob Living, Cob Construction, Cob Architecture, Cob Housing, Cob Hotel, Cob Dwelling, building with cob

Cob Village – One Community Pod 3

The Cob Village will provide 20 resident units and 8 visitor units with a social/recreational/developmental focus of artistic and creative expression. In support of this, this village will provide a central playhouse and presentation structure and 4 different wings dedicated to art and creativity. Each wing will feature a different large-scale maker space and a separate large-scale social and recreation space. The village will house 30-50 people and be open source shared with all the same details, and level of detail, used in the Earthbag Village and Straw Bale Villages.

This page contains the following sections related to the Cob Village:

Note: We are currently seeking those who consider themselves experts in any one of the above areas to help us design each of the maker spaces. If you’d like to help, CLICK  HERE.

THIS PAGE IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION BUT DEVELOPING FAST
CHECK BACK REGULARLY FOR THE MOST UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION

COB VILLAGE SEARCH ENGINE

Highest Good Hub
Open Source Component
Current Village Focus

 

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WHAT IS A COB VILLAGE

Cob Village Icon, building with cob, cob home, cob living, cob architecture, cob construction, open source architecture, Highest Good Housing, One Community, Sustainable Community Construction, Eco-living, Green Living, Community Living, Self-sufficiency, Highest Good for All, One Community Global, Earthbag Village, Straw Bale Village, Cob Village, Compressed Earth Block Village, Recycled Materials Village, Shipping Container Village, Tree House Village, DCC, open source architecture, open source construction, sustainable housing, eco-tourism, global transformation, green construction, LEED Platinum, sustainable village, green village LEED Platinum Village, Eco-living villageCob is an ancient building material composed of dirt, straw and water that may have been used for construction since prehistoric times. Some of the oldest man-made structures in Afghanistan are composed of rammed earth and cob and still standing! We will build the cob village to offer another open source self-sufficient and self-replicating teacher/demonstration community, village, and city option for community living, eco-tourism establishment, and global propagation and education.

Cob Village 640 Render, Cob Village, Cob Living, Cob Construction, Cob Architecture, Cob Housing, Cob Hotel, Cob Dwelling, building with cob

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render (click to enlarge)

 

WAYS TO CONTRIBUTE TO EVOLVING THIS SUSTAINABILITY COMPONENT WITH US

SUGGESTIONS     ●     CONSULTING     ●     MEMBERSHIP     ●     OTHER OPTIONS

CONSULTANTS ON THE COB VILLAGE DESIGN

Dean ScholzArchitectural Designer
Diana Vieira
Architecture and Urban Planning Student
Douglas Simms Stenhouse
: Architect and Water Color Artist
Flávia Galimberte BozedaArchitecture and Interior Design Student
Guy Grossfeld: Graphic Designer
Mayke BalbinoArchitecture and Urban Design Student
Nelli LeventalMFA of Graphic Design and College Professor
Raquel de Oliveira AlvesArchitecture and Urban Planning Student
Renata MaeharaCivil Engineering Student and Drafter
Sayonara Batista4th-year Architecture and Urban Planning Student

 

WHY A COB VILLAGE

Cob Village Icon, building with cob, cob home, cob living, cob architecture, cob construction, open source architecture, Highest Good Housing, One Community, Sustainable Community Construction, Eco-living, Green Living, Community Living, Self-sufficiency, Highest Good for All, One Community Global, Earthbag Village, Straw Bale Village, Cob Village, Compressed Earth Block Village, Recycled Materials Village, Shipping Container Village, Tree House Village, DCC, open source architecture, open source construction, sustainable housing, eco-tourism, global transformation, green construction, LEED Platinum, sustainable village, green village LEED Platinum Village, Eco-living villageCob construction has been used for thousands of years, can be formed into most shapes and is very sustainable as a building material. As One Community continues open sourcing large-scale sustainable village models, the Cob Village will utilize the remaining straw from Pod 2 to demonstrate what is possible with large-scale sustainable construction using cob and rammed earth. The makers spaces and associated living spaces will house top artists interested in sharing their gifts and creative talents with One Community, each other, and visitors as part of the One Community fulfilled living model and their community contribution towards further development of the 7 sustainable villages and internships within the Highest Good education program.

The makers spaces will provide creative and educational space for all residents and visitors and the central hall will provide large-scale dining and seating for 200+ people with two stages for presentations of artistic creations, dance, comedy, and theater. The makers spaces will include:

  • A Wood Maker Space
  • A Metal and Glass Maker Space
  • A Painting, Sculpting, Masonry, Tile Work, and Pottery Maker Space
  • A Weaving and Textile Maker Space
Cob Village Final Render, Front View, Guy Grossfeld, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Front View

 

ADVANTAGES OF THIS BUILDING METHOD

The Advantages of cob construction are many:

  1. Artistic construction: Building artistically with cob is very easy because the substance is so pliable. When you build with cob, you are literally building your walls one small lump of material at a time. This makes sweeping curves, slopes, waves, and geometric designs easy to sculpt with cob
  2. Abundant building materials: Made with clay, sand, and straw
  3. Cob is energy-efficient because it has high thermal mass, meaning it can soak up unwanted heat during the daytime and release it at night when outside temperatures cool down. In addition, because cob homes are not angular and rigid, structural openings for windows can be carved in at the perfect orientation to take full advantage of indigenous sun angles (for the harvest of natural light and the sun’s passive solar heat)
  4. Long lasting: Cob is a very old building method. There are homes that still standing today in Wales, United Kingdom, that are at least 500 years old
  5. Fireproof: Cob does not burn
  6. Termite proof: The soil, sand, clay, and straw found in cob does not taste delicious to termites, burrowing insects, or rodents, which makes cob immune to the attack of destructive pests;
  7. Strong earthquake resistance: Because the straw, which is part of the cob mix, acts like a natural re-bar to hold the whole structure together as one monolithic piece. This makes cob homes extremely solid and resistant
  8. Anyone can build with cob: It is not required to be an expert to help in the building process. Even children can help build in many instances
  9. Supports community involvement: Building a home with cob is best done with a group and the experience, while very hard work, has been described as “transformational” for the group involved
  10. Healthy: Because cob homes eschew the use of manufactured materials that flake and outgas, indoor air is kept pure, clean and free of pollutants, making these homes ideal for those who struggle with allergies. Cob is also a naturally porous material, so cob walls will “breathe” quite readily, and this will help keep indoor air circulating efficiently
  11. Artistic: Because of cob’s wonderful pliability, the interior of a cob house can be shaped and formed to include niches, grooves, natural shelves, and benches that emerge directly from the walls
  12. Quiet: Earthen walls absorb sound marvelously regardless of the source, so indoor sounds do not reverberate and outdoor noise fails to penetrate
  13. Biodegradable, recyclable, and the material’s color reflects the local soil to blend in aesthetically
  14. Cob, dug and mixed on site manually removes the need for transportation and the resulting carbon emissions
  15. Low energy use during construction and no pollution produced during the building process either

LIMITATIONS/DISADVANTAGES OF THIS BUILDING METHOD

Cob construction also has some limitations:

  1. Hard to get permitted: Cob can be very difficult to get permitted because cob is not covered by building codes, which gives county administrators great leeway when deciding whether or not to issue building permits for these sorts of structures. In urban and suburban environments, approval might be all but impossible, while in other areas you might have to involve a structural engineer and an architect in the process before a building permit can be issued
  2. Very labor intensive during construction: While it is theoretically possible to build a cob house of any size, because of the time and labor involved and the desire most have to keep costs down, anything larger than a moderate-sized two-bedroom home might not be practical. If the goal is to construct a full-time residence, cob is undoubtedly best suited for individuals, couples, and small families; it is always a great choice for smaller structures, however, like cabins, art studios, or tree houses;
  3. Poor insulatory properties: Because it is porous, cob is not a very good insulating material. Of course, insulation can be added to walls, ceilings, and under floors, but even then cob houses would still be difficult to keep warm in really cold climates such as those found in the northern United States. Cob houses are excellent for those who live in desert climates, where cob’s high thermal mass properties can regulate indoor temperatures quite effectively, and they work just fine in places where it does not freeze much in the winter. But in frigid locations they would consume too much energy (for wintertime heating) to be practical
  4. Needs drying time: The build process is slow – up to 15 months to allow phases to dry
  5. Will shrink: After completion, it can take several months for building to finish shrinking
  6. Larger than average space needs: Wall thickness means a new cob home requires a larger footprint than a “normal” home
  7. Relatively few builders are skilled in using, constructing or repairing cob
  8. Construction cannot take place in wet weather and is therefore largely restricted to dry Summer months
  9. Cob is susceptible to water damage

 

ADDITIONAL COB VILLAGE DETAILS

More renders and detailed descriptions of all the other featured aspects of this village are coming…

Cob Village SW Living Space Looking South Final Render, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Southwest Living Space Looking South

Cob Village SW Living Space Looking North Final Render, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Southwest Living Space Looking North

Cob Village Final Render of Southeast Living Space, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Southeast Living Space

One Community Cob Village, Dean Scholz, Final Render, Southeast Living Space looking south

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Southeast Living Space Looking South

Cob Village Southeast Living Space Looking North Cutaway View, Dean Scholz, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Southeast Living Space Looking North Cutaway View

Cob Village Southeast Living Space Looking North Loft View, Dean Scholz, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Southeast Living Space Looking North Loft View

Cob Village Final Render of Westside Living Space Upstairs View, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Westside Living Space Upstairs View

final render of the Section View of the Westside Living Spaces Looking North

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Section View of the Westside Living Spaces Looking North

Cob Village NE Living Space Looking West Final Render, Dean Scholz, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Northeast Living Space Looking West

Cob Village NE Living Space Looking Southwest Final Render, Dean Scholz, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Northeast Living Space Looking Southwest

Cob Village NE Living Space Looking East Final Render, Dean Scholz, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Northeast Living Space Looking East

Cob Village West Wing Bathroom Dean Scholz, Final Render, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – West Wing Bathroom

Cob Village West Wing Looking Down Dean Scholz, Final Render, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – West Wing Looking Down

Cob Village West Wing Looking Northwest Dean Scholz, Final Render, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – West Wing Looking Northwest

Cob Village West Wing Looking South, Dean Scholz, Final Render, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – West Wing Looking South

Adding details Dean’s previous work, Guy Grossfeld (Graphic Designer) added people and nature elements to create this new final render of the Front External View Looking East for the Cob Village. One Community Cob Village

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Front External View Looking East

final views of the Cob Village Roof View Looking Southwest, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Westside View Looking North

Cob Village Final Render, Front View Looking Northwest, Guy Grossfeld, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Front View Looking Northwest

Cob Village Final Render, Center View Looking Northeast, Guy Grossfeld, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Center View Looking Northeast

One Community Cob Village Center View Looking Northwest final render

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Center View Looking Northwest

Cob Village Final Render, Back View Looking East, Guy Grossfeld, One Community

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Back View Looking East

One Community Cob Village Back View Looking Southeast final render

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Back View Looking Southeast

One Community Cob Village Rooftop View Looking North Final Render with People, Guy Grossfeld

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Rooftop View Looking North

One Community Cob Village Final Render with People, Roof View Looking Southeast, Guy Grossfeld

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Roof View Looking Southeast

Adding details to Dean’s previous work, Guy Grossfeld (Graphic Designer) added people and nature elements to create final view of the Cob Village Roof View Looking Southwest:

The One Community Cob Village | Concept Render – Roof View Looking Southwest

More Coming…

 

RESOURCES

 

SUMMARY

Cob Village Icon, building with cob, cob home, cob living, cob architecture, cob construction, open source architecture, Highest Good Housing, One Community, Sustainable Community Construction, Eco-living, Green Living, Community Living, Self-sufficiency, Highest Good for All, One Community Global, Earthbag Village, Straw Bale Village, Cob Village, Compressed Earth Block Village, Recycled Materials Village, Shipping Container Village, Tree House Village, DCC, open source architecture, open source construction, sustainable housing, eco-tourism, global transformation, green construction, LEED Platinum, sustainable village, green village LEED Platinum Village, Eco-living villagePod 3 is designed to demonstrate large-scale sustainable housing that is maximally artistic and creative. It will also provide large-scale maker spaces for artistic, functional, and sustainable enrichment of One Community. In addition to this, the Cob Village is expected to house our first full-time artist community members. Living in these residences, there should be sufficient need that full-time artist members of One Community (if they so desire) will be able to contribute 100% of their community contribution time to applying and sharing their artistic skills through open source classes and creations offered as part of our positive global transformation goalsHighest Good Education program, and development of the rest of the One Community villages and property.

 

FREQUENTLY ANSWERED QUESTIONS

Q: Where can I get more information about your philosophies for world change?

Please take a look at each of these additional pages: (click icons)

living and creating for The Highest Good of All, global transformation, making a difference, good for people, good for the planet, good for the economy, good for everyone, the solution to everythingglobal cooperation, solutions that create solutions, global collaborationa new way to life, living fulfilled, an enriching life, enriched life, fulfilled life, ascension, evolving consciousness, loving lifetransforming the global environment, transformational change, evolving living, One Community, One Community Global, creating a new world, the solution to everything, the solution to everything, the solution to anything, creating world change, open source future, for The Highest Good of All, a world that works for everyone, world change, transforming the planet, difference makers, sustainability non-profit, solution based thinking, being the change we want to see in the world, making a difference, sustainable planet, global cooperative, 501c3 sustainability, creating our future, architects of the future, engineers of the future, sustainable civilization, a new civilization, a new way to live, ecological world, people working together, Highest Good food, Highest Good energy, Highest Good housing, Highest Good education, Highest Good society

Q: What were the initial inspirations for these designs?

With 7 villages to be designed, and a desire for artistic and unique appearances that also had a deeper relationship to the purpose/intent of each village, we drew inspiration from the 7-chakra system from Hinduism and Tantric Buddhism and the Japanese 5-elements philosophy.

Note: One Community does not endorse or subscribe to any one spiritual philosophy. You can read more about our philosophy on spirituality and religion on our Spirituality Page

The Cob Village was designed thinking of the Solar Plexus (3rd) Chakra from Hinduism and Tantric Buddhism and the Fire Element (“ka” & “hi”-“huǒ”) from the Japanese 5-elements philosophy. These ideas coincided with the maker-space and creative expression focus of this village. Further inspiration for each of the different wings of this village came from thinking of music, weaving, painting, and sculpting and choosing room and roof designs that represented each of these. The associated color of “yellow” helped develop the color palette for this village and we further aligned, diversified, and distinguished the purpose and intent of the village by looking at One Community’s core values and focusing on the values of DiversityFreedomContribution, and Personal Growth.

Cob Village Colors, One Community

Cob Village Color Palette – Click for High-Resolution PDF

To further share the design process for this village, here are some of the initial renders and design drawings:

Initial drawings done by Nelli Levental, MFA of Graphic Design and College Professor for Classes in Sustainable Design

drawing of music-inspired communal living structure for cob village, One Community

Initial Concept Drawing for the Cob Village

second round of Cob Village (Pod 3) sketches, One Community

Initial Concept Drawings for the Cob Village

Initial Revit development of this village by Renata MaeharaCivil Engineering Student and Drafter

Cob Village (Pod 3) designs, One Community

Initial Revit Designs

Renata (Civil Engineering Student) continued work on the Central part of the Cob Village (Pod 3). She updated the layout of the kitchen and dining hall and also added textures to the roof and exterior walls to make the model more realistic.

Initial Revit Designs