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Aquapini and Walipini Planting and Harvesting

This page is the open source project-launch blueprinting page specific to the free-sharing and global collaboration regarding the One Community Walipini, Aquapini, and Zen Aquapini planting and harvesting details. These structures will adhere to our botanical garden guidelines while demonstrating 4 distinctly different growing zones that will produce a combination of quality, volume, and food diversity that significantly exceeds what is available in most grocery stores. For more general information on these structures, visit the Aquapini and Walipini Open Source Project-launch Blueprinting Hub.

The following links will take you directly to the following information on this page:

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Aquapini, Walipini, and Zen Aquapini Planting and Harvesting Overview

The six initial food production structures of One Community are designed to be duplicated as standalone structures or as a complete village food infrastructure set. The systems will consist of a large-scale food production aquapini (LSAQ)2 different “backyard version” zen aquapini designs (Z1 and Z2), and 3 separate maximally-affordable Walipini Greenhouses (W1, W2, and W3). Combined they will provide:

  • Unparalleled food diversity
  • 6 unique aesthetic environments
  • 4 distinctly different growing environments
  • Over 11,500 square feet (1,068 sq meters) of year-round growing space
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Grow Zone Overview: Click Image to Enlarge

GROWING SPACE (GS) AND INTERNAL ENVIRONMENTAL DIFFERENCES

LARGE-SCALE PRODUCTION AQUAPINI

TOTAL GROWING AREA FOR THIS STRUCTURE: 1,989 sq ft./184.78 sq m
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Large-scale Production Aquapini Planting Map – Click to Enlarge

OVERVIEW

HARVEST    ●    N. TREES    ●    MEDIA BEDS    ●    SLOPE    ●    POND    ●    DWC    ●    SAP    ●    COST

The Large-scale Production Aquapini will provide a diverse mix of super-food perennial and annual crops. For the species mix chosen, we will maintain an internal temperature of 60-90 degrees Fahrenheit (16-32 degrees celcius) and humidity levels of 50-80%. The focus of this structure is maximum nutritional value, diversity, and volume through the efficient utilization of every possible cubic foot of space, lumen of light, and BTU of heat. Such factors as work flow and ergonomics, light and shade requirements, pollination needs, etc. were carefully considered with the intent to incorporate these elements into a synergistic and harmonious whole. There is also a small recreational space built into the design.

Since the Aquapini’s focus initially is the production of high-volumes of high-consumption foods (cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, lettuce, chard, etc.) from the aquaponics setup, the other plantings have been planned around this infrastructure. Also, in keeping with permacultural design principles, the use of plant “stacking” and the incorporation of serpentine terrace walls to increase “edge effect” (and add solar mass) have been integrated to make the best use of the available space and light.

5-YEAR FOOD PRODUCTION PROJECTION AVERAGES

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE COMPLETE SPREADSHEET

FOOD YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR 4 YEAR 5
Veg 3,073 lbs 3,288 lbs 3,300 lbs 3,300 lbs 3,300 lbs
Fruit 85 lbs 711 lbs 1,028 lbs 1,447 lbs 1,895 lbs
Other 763 lbs 1,299 lbs 1,453 lbs 1,453 lbs 1,453 lbs
AquaC 1,010 lbs 1,010 lbs 1,010 lbs 1,010 lbs 1,010 lbs
TOTAL 4,931 lbs 6,308 lbs 6,791 lbs 7,210 lbs 7,658 lbs

 

 COMPLETE INDIVIDUAL PLANT DETAILS

NOTE: Latin names are used first because they are universally accepted, with common names following in parenthesis. The index or reference number preceding each plant name is cross referenced to the planting cost analysis price list (coming soon) as well as the planting layout map above. The planting plan is not a firm declaration and may need to be modified as we continue to source plant material and/or on site (with ongoing updates here) after all plants are preliminarily sited. Every tree is listed but, due to the quantities of plants, not every individual plant is listed on the planting layout map.

 

NORTH WALL TREES

#1A :: Mangifera (Mango)

Mangifera, mango, kuini, pajang, kasturi, lali jewa)Mangifera is native from India to Indonesia where they have been cultivated for thousands of years. Mature trees can produce as much as 300 pounds of fruit in a season, and the trees can live for 300 years. The tree yields a useful timber which is used for construction, turnery, and musical instruments. The resin has been used as varnish, however care must be taken as some people are allergic to it.

The fruit has a juicy fragrant pulp with the texture of a peach. Of the thousands of varieties known, some tend to be fibrous, while the higher quality mangoes are fiber-free. The flavor is unique — rich, sweet, with a touch of acid that lends complexity. In each fruit there is a single large seed. Fruits are eaten fresh, made into juice, preserves, or dried, and are a rich source of vitamins, carotenoids, and fiber.

PLACEMENTS

This tree will be placed on the west end of the row where its evergreen tendency will not shed leaves into the aquaponics system. It will also be placed against the north wall of the aquapini to avoid casting shade on other parts of the house.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Resin in mango skin may cause skin allergies for some people
  • They are medium to large trees but can be kept smaller with pruning
  • Mangoes are adapted to a dry season, and can stand considerable drought
  • The tree has few insect pests in the US, among these is the mango seed weevil
  • Prefers a dry period for blooming, humidity can cause flower loss to anthracnose
  • Mangoes need moisture during fruit development, but excessive rain can cause fruits to be bland
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive the mango as a small grafted tree, seeking out the smallest sizes possible, both to reduce costs and with the option of training and shaping the tree prior to planting. These will be up-potted to a larger size (typically 5 gal.) and grown on for a year while the infrastructure is built. When ready, the tree will be planted into a hole dug slightly larger than the pot size, taking care not to plant it too high or too deep. The plant is then watered in thoroughly and mulched to prevent weed competition. No fertilizer is to be placed in the planting hole; the first fertilization takes place after the tree begins actively growing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Mango

 

#2A :: Persea americana cv. ‘Queen’ (Avocado)

Persea, avocado, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe avocado is native to Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. Each of these regions has developed a genetically distinct landrace within the species. The tree is evergreen or briefly deciduous in the winter, especially if temperatures drop. The leaves of the Mexican landrace have an anise-like aroma and are used as a spice. The tree yields an even grained wood, but it is not durable.

The fruit of ‘Queen’ is round to slightly pear shaped with a leathery skin, and can weigh over three pounds. The flesh has a buttery consistency, and is not sweet but very oily. The flavor is a subtle, rich, vegetable taste that goes well with many foods. The fruits are nutritionally dense, rich in vitamins, unsaturated fats, and protein. One of the most popular uses is guacamole; a mixture of avocado, onions, and spices.

PLACEMENTS

The Persea tree will be placed against the north wall of the Aquapini to avoid casting shade on other parts of the house.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Productive only in full sun
  • Whitewashing the trunk and/or branches will prevent sunburn
  • The trees like regular watering but cannot tolerate waterlogged soil
  • Trees will suffer with the slightest frost, and will lose leaves and twigs
  • The Mexican landrace of avocado is the most cold hardy of the avocados
  • They are a small to medium sized tree and can be pruned to a height of 10 feet
  • Avocado varieties have two blossom types, A & B; having both present increases yield
  • Extended drought will cause leaf drop; growth will resume with watering but bark may sunburn
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as small grafted trees, seeking out the smallest sizes possible, both to reduce costs and to have the option of training and shaping the tree prior to planting. These will be up-potted to a larger size (typically 5 gal.) and grown on for a year while the infrastructure is built. When ready, the tree will be planted into a hole dug slightly larger than the pot size, taking care not to plant it too high or too deep. The plant is then watered in thoroughly and mulched to prevent weed competition. No fertilizer is to be placed in the planting hole; the first fertilization takes place after the tree begins actively growing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Avocado   ●   Avocado Info on CRFG.org

 

#3A :: Averrhoa carambola (Starfruit)

Averrhoa, carambola, starfruit, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe carambola or starfruit is a small tree native to S.E. Asia. They withstand pruning and shaping well and are mostly pest-free. It is a rapid growing tree that usually will produce food at 4-5 years of age. It flowers throughout the year, with main fruiting seasons from April to June and October to December in Malaysia. In ideal situations one carambola tree can produce 200 to 400 pounds of fruit a year.

The fruits are 4 to 10 inches in length and have a waxy, translucent skin. The texture is crisp, somewhat like watermelon but juicier, and very refreshing. The taste is sweet in the better varieties, with a slight tartness due to ascorbic and oxalic acid. There are generally some small seeds near the center; some types are seedless. Grafted trees can begin to fruit in their second year, and even small trees yield heavily.

PLACEMENTS

The Averrhoa tree will be placed against the north wall of the Aquapini to avoid casting shade on other parts of the house.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Prefers high humidity and lots of water
  • All parts of the tree have medicinal uses
  • Does not have soil type preference, but needs good drainage
  • Cross pollination is usually unnecessary, but another variety nearby gives larger crops
  • Trees are cold sensitive; leaves and twigs will be burned back by frost, but can recover
  • The unripe fruit can be used to polish metal, and will remove rust stains from white cloth
  • Fruits contain oxalic acid; people with a history of kidney stones should not eat the fruit
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as small grafted trees, seeking out the smallest sizes possible, both to reduce costs and to have the option of training and shaping the tree prior to planting. These will be up-potted to a larger size (typically 5 gal.) and grown on for a year while the infrastructure is built. When ready, the tree will be planted into a hole dug slightly larger than the pot size, taking care not to plant it too high or too deep. The plant is then watered in thoroughly and mulched to prevent weed competition. No fertilizer is to be placed in the planting hole; the first fertilization takes place after the tree begins actively growing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Starfruit

 

#4A :: Annona cherimola cv. ‘Selma’ (Cherimoya)

Annona, cherimoya, atemoya, sweetsop, custard apple, soursop, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe cherimoya is a small frost sensitive tree native to the highlands of Latin America. The trees are 15-25 feet in nature, but can be maintained 8-15 ft by pruning. Mature trees can be very productive if their cultural requirements are met. Pollination requirements are not fully understood for the cherimoya; many insect species are involved. Cherimoyas are partly deciduous during the winter months.

The fruits have a soft, melting texture and a flavor reminiscent of pineapple and ripe bananas. The Selma variety was developed in San Diego by Paul Thompson. It is unique in having pink flesh and a sprightly berry-like flavor. Fruits yield to gentle pressure when ripe and are high in B-vitamins, minerals and soluble fiber. Care should be taken to avoid eating the dark seeds as they contain toxic compounds.

PLACEMENTS

The Annona tree will be placed against the north wall of the Aquapini to avoid casting shade on other parts of the house, in the center of the tree row where its aromatic leaves will have maximum effect against insect pests on the other trees in the row. Leaves contain insecticidal compounds, and may be useful companion plants. 

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees should be pruned to form wide lateral branches
  • In very wet soils, A. glabra should be used as rootstock
  • Graft compatibility is still being worked out for many species
  • Bearing is influenced by adequate nutrition, especially micronutrients
  • Water regularly as trees will drop leaves and fruit if they are drought-stressed
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as small grafted trees, seeking out the smallest sizes possible, both to reduce costs and to have the option of training and shaping the tree prior to planting. These will be up-potted to a larger size (typically 5 gal.) and grown on for a year while the infrastructure is built. When ready, the tree will be planted into a hole dug slightly larger than the pot size, taking care not to plant it too high or too deep. The plant is then watered in thoroughly and mulched to prevent weed competition. No fertilizer is to be placed in the planting hole; the first fertilization takes place after the tree begins actively growing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Cherimoya

 

#5A :: Eugenia candolleana (Rainforest Plum)

Eugenia, pitanga, mulchi, grumichama, uvaia doce, sundrop, pitangatuba, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe rainforest plum is a small tree growing 10-15 feet and native to the Atlantic Forest of coastal Brazil. Like many Eugenias, the tree tends to branch close to the ground. The smooth trunk and branches develop a thin peeling bark. In its habitat it experiences a dry season, but it has been shown to thrive with year-round rainfall as well. It bears a purple-skinned fruit with aromatic white flesh with a single seed.

The mildly sweet fruit is usually eaten fresh, and can also be made into preserves by those who have enough of this rare fruit. It has been only recently cultivated outside of Brazil, but is rated highly by some growers in Hawaii and Florida. The fruits are borne in clusters at the base of the leaf petioles. This species is rapid growing and early bearing with people reporting fruit in the second year from seed.

PLACEMENTS

The rainforest plum will be placed against the north wall of the Aquapini to avoid casting shade on other parts of the house.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Thrives in full sun
  • Requires good irrigation during the flowering and fruiting seasons
  • The plants are rapid growers, especially with steady water and fertilizer
  • Rainforest plum comes from a region with acid soils, so pH should be monitored
  • Seeds from this rare species should be saved and distributed to aid its conservation
  • Eugenias can be affected by the Eugenia psyllid; this is not fatal and can be controlled
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seed. They should be sown immediately and kept warm and moist until germination. Plants should be up potted as needed until they reach a 5 gal. size whereupon they may be planted in their permanent location as indicated on the planting plan.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Rainforest Plum

 

#6A :: Casimiroa (White Sapote)

Casimiroa, white sapote, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe white sapote is a tree in the citrus family native to Mexico. The tree is normally 15-30 feet tall, but can be kept smaller by pruning. They are highly productive, with some varieties capable of bearing fruit nearly year-round. They are successful in whatever climates oranges can be grown. Since it is in the citrus family, the blossoms are attractive to bees; the flowers produce pollen, but little nectar.

The apple-sized fruit have the sweetness of a pear and the texture of an avocado. The paper thin skin can be eaten, but sometimes has a bitter resinous taste. The skin tends to “slip” when ripe, and can be easily removed. There are 1 to 5 seeds near the center of the fruit. Freezing the peeled, seeded fruit to make a dairy-free “ice cream” is a good way to put the abundant crop to use.

PLACEMENTS

The Casimiroa tree will be placed against the north wall of the Aquapini to avoid casting shade on other parts of the house.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Prefers sun and infrequent but deep watering
  • Will take considerable drought once established
  • They are a host to larvae of the swallowtail butterfly
  • Like citrus trees, they can be subject to aphids and scale
  • Trees can stand a few degrees of frost but will lose their leaves
  • Grafts callus quickly, but may delay budding out for several weeks
  • Trees can be stressed into flowering by withholding water 2-3 weeks
  • A related shrubby species, C. pringlei, might make a dwarfing rootstock
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as small grafted trees, seeking out the smallest sizes possible, both to reduce costs and to have the option of training and shaping the tree prior to planting. These will be up-potted to a larger size (typically 5 gal.) and grown on for a year while the infrastructure is built. When ready, the tree will be planted into a hole dug slightly larger than the pot size, taking care not to plant it too high or too deep. The plant is then watered in thoroughly and mulched to prevent weed competition. No fertilizer is to be placed in the planting hole; the first fertilization takes place after the tree begins actively growing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – White Sapote

 

#7A :: Litchi (Lychee)

Litchi, lychee, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe lychee is a tree native to China and S.E Asia where it has been cultivated for centuries. The tree grows slowly to 30 feet but can be kept small by pruning. The fruits are a single-seeded berry encased in a pink-to-red brittle shell and borne on the outside of the canopy, where they make an ornamental display. The tree has few pests and diseases outside its native land, and these are easily controlled.

The fruit is encased in a pink to red brittle shell that cracks open easily. Inside is the white translucent flesh with a grape-like texture, and a single seed. The flavor is sweet and subacid, with a strong perfumed taste unique to lychees. In some varieties many of the seeds abort, making “chicken tongues”; these varieties are highly prized. Lychees are eaten fresh, and are also canned or dried (the so-called “litchi nuts”).

PLACEMENTS

The Litchi tree will be placed against the north wall of the Aquapini at the east end in order to give maximum room to its low branching habit, and to avoid casting shade on other parts of the house.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Some varieties tend to bear heavily in alternate years
  • Spraying with calcium nitrate can sometimes force blooming
  • Grafted trees may fruit faster than the more traditional air layers
  • Lychee benefits greatly from organic matter and mycorrhizal inoculant
  • The tendency towards alternate bearing can be somewhat offset by pruning
  • Trees prefer warm wet summers followed by a cool dry winter to induce bloom
  • The lychee tree has brittle wood so care should be taken not to overload branches
  • Although the tree prefers moisture, good drainage is essential to avoid fungal diseases
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as small grafted trees or air layers. For grafted trees, we will seek out the smallest sizes possible, both to reduce costs and to have the option of training and shaping the tree prior to planting. These will be up-potted to a larger size (typically 5 gal.) and grown on for a year while the infrastructure is built. Lychee trees have a tendency to branch near the base and form a wide V-shape. Since this tree is going between two filter beds in the Aquapini, this branching tendency must be delayed by pruning, until the trunk is above 4 feet high. When ready, the tree will be planted into a hole dug slightly larger than the pot size, taking care not to plant it too high or too deep. The plant is then watered in thoroughly and mulched to prevent weed competition. No fertilizer is to be placed in the planting hole; the first fertilization takes place after the tree begins actively growing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Lychee

MEDIA BEDS

#8A :: Synsepalum dulcificum (Miracle Fruit, Munga)

Synsepalum dulcificum, miracle fruit, munga, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodMiracle fruit is an evergreen shrub in the Sapotaceae native to West Africa, where it grows in the understory. Forming an oval to pyramidal shaped bush or small tree, this tropical plant grows very slowly to a height of 4-6 feet in a container, and 10-15 feet in its natural habitat. Synsepalum dulcificum has deep green, elongated leaves, small brown flowers, and tiny red fruits.

The fruit is a ½ inch long red berry, that is mostly seed. The “miracle” is that the scant flesh contains a unique glycoprotein called miraculin. This protein binds to the taste receptors so that sour is perceived as sweet. A lemon eaten after a miracle berry tastes like the sweetest lemonade. This effect lasts for about thirty minutes or until the protein is washed away by saliva or drinking liquids.

PLACEMENTS

A group of Synsepalums will be planted at the bottom of the slope planting where they will benefit from the moisture draining from upslope.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees prefer partial shade, and require acidic soil
  • The yield is improved by pinching out terminal buds
  • Synsepalum will react badly to chlorinated tap water
  • Trees require steady moisture, and will drop leaves and fruit if dry
  • They show chlorosis in alkaline soils and must be treated with chelated iron
  • These trees are very tropical in their requirements and must be kept above 32F
  • If the berries are continually picked, the plant can flower and fruit continuously
  • Apparently no one knows if the miraculin gene can be bred into other Sapotaceae
  • Of the species of Synsepalum in central Africa, only S. dulcificum contains miraculin
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these as small seedling plants. Miracle fruit tend to be slow growing plants so we will purchase the largest specimens available. We will up pot them and grow them on until they are large enough for permanent planting, approximately 3 feet in height.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Miracle Fruit 

 

#9A :: Centella (Gotu Cola)

 Centella, Gotu Cola, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Gotu cola is a creeping tender perennial in the Umbelliferae, native to the Old World tropics and subtropics. It is highly valued in traditional Chinese medicine as a tonic. A few leaves eaten daily are said to improve mental clarity, increase vitality, and lengthen one’s life. The leaves are eaten or dried for tea. Science has found a number of beneficial effects, including antiviral and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

PLACEMENTS

We will plant gotu cola in the north wall planting beds, where it will benefit from the shade of the fruit trees.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Gotu cola requires a frost-free climate
  • They grow best in soils of high fertility
  • Centella prefers partial shade to full sun
  • The plant is easily propagated by root divisions
  • They require steady moisture, and suffer with prolonged drought
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Centella

 

#10A :: Limnophila aromatica (Rau Om)

Limnophila, aromatica, Rau Om, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Limnophila aromatica is a tender, tropical, creeping herb in the Plantaginaceae native to S. E. Asia. It is used extensively in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand as an edible green. Rau Om is aquatic to amphibious, and will grow fully submerged, in standing water or moist soil. It’s flavor has been described as “a beguiling floral character” or “lemon zest and cumin”.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Rau Om in the middle bed along the north wall of the Aquapini where it will benefit from the shade of the adjacent fruit trees.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Rau Om will grow in partial shade to full sun
  • Plants will not tolerate frost and have no invasive potential outside the tropics
  • The plant is cultivated in manured rice paddies, and can utilize high nitrogen loads
  • The plant will be kept in the Aquaponic system until its weediness can be determined
  • Related species of Limnophila are used fully submerged in aquaria as decorative plants
  • In areas with regular rainfall, the plant has escaped cultivation, and is considered weedy
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Limnophila aromatica

 

#11A :: Cymbopogon (Lemon Grass, Palma Rosha)

Cymbopogon, Lemon Grass, Palma Rosha, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Lemon grass belongs to a group of perennial bunchgrasses native to the tropics of Asia and Africa. It contains high levels of citral, a chemical found in the peel of lemons. The tender bases of the shoots are used in Asian cooking as they give the flavor of lemons to a dish without adding tartness. Some Cymbopogon species are also used to distill their essential oils to make such things as perfumes, cosmetics and soaps.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow lemon grass in one of the planting beds along the north wall, where its aromatic oils will help keep the fruit trees free of insect pests.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants will withstand little if any frost
  • The plants are easily propagated by division or seeds
  • The deep-rooted grasses can be cut repeatedly for mulch
  • The inner white pith of the leaf bases is chopped and eaten
  • The plants are carefree but fertilizing produces more succulent leaf bases
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings or seed. The rooted cuttings can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Cymbopogon

 

#12A :: Ocimum (Basils)

Ocimum, Basils, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Like mints, basils are another group of herbaceous perennials in the Mint family and their aromas and flavors are due to essential oils. Unlike mints, the chemical makeup of the basils is very different, resulting in completely unique flavors and aromas. Basils are generally tolerant of drier conditions than many mints. The leaves are used in many types of cuisine, and several species are also used medicinally.

PLACEMENTS

In the Aquapini we will grow basil in the north wall planting beds where they will act as companion plants to the fruit trees.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Basils like full sun and dislike cold damp sites
  • Pinching the growing tips promotes more leaf growth
  • Warm sunny conditions bring out basil’s essential oils
  • Basils will grow in poor soils but require adequate moisture
  • Basil is subject to fungal diseases when grown in cold wet soils
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seeds or rooted cuttings. The rooted cuttings can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin. Seeds should be sown in a nursery flat and kept warm and moist until germination and then dibbled into individual 2-4” pots until a good root system forms. They can then be transplanted where they are to stand.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Ocimum

 

#13A :: Gynura sp. (Daun Dewa, Sambung Nyawah, Malay Spinach)

Gynura sp.,Daun Dewa, Bai Bing Cao, Sambung Nyawah, Malay Spinach, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Gynura procumbens and other Gynura species are tropical Asian herbs in the Asteraceae. They are low growing creeping perennials that root along the stems to create a ground cover. Gynura are generally pest-free and used as an edible green either raw or cooked. It is also grown for its medicinal properties of reducing blood pressure and lowering cholesterol and triglycerides.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Gynura in one of the beds along the north wall where it can benefit from the shade of the fruit trees.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Gynura is frost tender and requires regular water
  • Plants are not heavy feeders, but prefer fertile soils
  • Plants will spread to form a ground cover in shady areas
  • Some Gynura species contain toxic compounds, species selection important
  • Plants appreciate partial shade, but can grow in full sun if they do not dry out
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Gynura

 

#14A :: Marsilea minuta (Sushni, Water Clover)

Marsilea minuta, Sushni, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Marsilea minuta is an amphibious fern in the Marsileaceae. It is widely grown as a potherb in India and Africa. The plant also has medicinal uses; it is said to promote sleep, ease coughs, and be a cerebral tonic. It should only be consumed after cooking, since a related species contains thiaminase which can cause thiamine deficiency. Cooking destroys any thiaminase.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow water clover in the north wall planting bed in the partial shade of the fruit trees.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants prefer part shade to full sun
  • In waterways the plant may have invasive potential
  • Water clover is easily grown from spores or division
  • Plants prefer abundant moisture, and can grow fully submerged
  • Leaves may be harvested continuously as the plant grows rapidly
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as divisions. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Marsilea‎

 

SOUTH AND WEST SLOPE PLANTINGS

#15A :: Cnidoscolus chayamansa (Chaya)

Cnidoscolus, chayamansa, Chaya, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cnidoscolus chayamansa is a semi-succulent shrub in the Euphorbiaceae native to Mesoamerica. It has been grown for centuries for its edible leaves, eaten steamed or boiled. They are one of the most nutritious leafy greens, as they are high in protein, minerals, and Vitamin A. Chaya’s amino profile is complemented when cooked with corn and squash seed. The flowers are white in clusters, borne above the foliage.

PLACEMENTS

Chaya will be placed in the lower tier of the slope planting to facilitate regular harvesting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant dies back to ground level at 32F
  • As a stem succulent, chaya endures considerable drought
  • Chaya has been selected from its ancestors to reduce the trichomes
  • Other Cnidoscolus species contain stinging trichomes similar to nettle
  • The plants that grow tall will fall over and root along the stems, forming natural thickets
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive the plants as rooted cuttings. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Cnidoscolus chayamansa

 

#16A :: Iboza riparia (Iboza, Musk Plant, Nutmeg Bush)

Iboza, riparia, Iboza, Musk, Plant, Nutmeg Bush, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Iboza riparia is a perennial shrub in the mint family native to South Africa. As the common names indicate, its foliage is very aromatic, and it is planted as an insect repellant. The plant also has medicinal uses. Iboza is an antimicrobial, antifungal, used to treat malaria, diarrhea, headaches and to heal wounds. The delicate off-white flowers are borne in great numbers above the foliage and are worked by bees.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow iboza in the lower tier slope planting adjacent to the seating area so people may enjoy the plants fragrance, and so its insect-repellant properties can benefit the cluster of citrus trees in that portion of the Aquapini.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Iboza will die back to ground level by frost
  • The plant readily self seeds in rainy weather
  • No pests or diseases seem to be known for Iboza
  • Iboza is a moisture loving plant, usually found on streambanks in South Africa
  • Propagation can be accomplished by rooting stems directly in a glass of water
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Iboza riparia

 

#17A-a :: Citrus X limon cv. ‘Villafranca’ (Lemon)

Citrus, X, limon, cv.,Villafranca, Lemon, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe Villafranca lemon was introduced to the US from Sicily in the late 1800’s. The tree is somewhat more spreading and less vigorous than the Eureka variety. It also appears to be less thorny on standard rootstocks. The tree tends to ripen its crop in the winter months, whereas Eureka has a broader season. The tree will be grown on the most dwarfing rootstock available to control size.

The fruit of the ‘Villafranca’ has pale yellow acid flesh ranging from a few to many seeds. The rind turns from deep green to bright yellow when ripe, indicating it is time to harvest. The Villafranca has a somewhat ‘sharper’ lemon flavor than other lemons and is prized by chefs. The entire fruit can be used in cooking, and is essential to the cuisines of the Mediterranean and Asia. The fruit is used in sauces, salads and drinks.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the ‘Villafranca’ lemon in the upper tier of the west slope at the north end of the bed, close to other citrus, so the fragrance can be enjoyed in the seating area.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Citrus is most efficiently fed through foliar spraying
  • Citrus trees need attention to pH and micronutrients
  • Most citrus fruit can hang on the tree for many weeks after maturity
  • They can become chlorotic on alkaline soils and like iron supplements
  • The trees are subtropical and can withstand some light frost and drought
  • Citrus has an extensive system of feeder roots, and benefits greatly from mulch
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as small grafted trees on dwarfing rootstock, seeking out the smallest sizes possible, both to reduce costs and to have the option of training and shaping the tree prior to planting. These will be up-potted to a larger size (typically 5 gal.) and grown on for a year while the infrastructure is built. When ready, the tree will be planted into a hole dug slightly larger than the pot size, taking care not to plant it too high or too deep. The plant is then watered in thoroughly and mulched to prevent weed competition. No fertilizer is to be placed in the planting hole; the first fertilization takes place after the tree begins actively growing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Citrus Variety Collection – Villafranca

 

#17A-b :: Citrus reticulata cv. ‘Honey’ (Mandarin)

Citrus, reticulata, cv., ‘Honey’, Mandarin, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe ‘Honey’ mandarin is a small to medium tree with dark green and somewhat narrower leaves than other citrus types. Their branches tend to be pendant, particularly when carrying their large crops of fruit. Unlike many types of citrus, the Honey mandarin does not store well on the tree. There are two varieties sold under this name; the ‘Murcott’ grown in Florida is also locally called ‘Honey’.

The fruit of the Honey mandarin is small, with a bright orange skin that separates easily from the fruit. The segments within range from having a few to many seeds, and a sweet, rich flavor that is very popular. The variety was never formally released, however, public demand for the fruit caused nurseries to begin selling it. While breeders initially thought the seeds were a problem, the rich flavor outweighed this issue.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the ‘Honey’ in the upper tier of the west planting slope next to the ‘Daisy’ which has similar cultural requirements, and so its fragrance can be enjoyed in the seating area.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Citrus is most efficiently fed through foliar spraying
  • Citrus trees require attention to pH and micronutrients
  • They can become chlorotic on alkaline soils and like iron supplements
  • The trees are subtropical and can withstand some light frost and drought
  • The ‘Honey’ bears heavily and may benefit from thinning to increase size
  • Citrus has an extensive system of feeder roots, and benefits greatly from mulch
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as small grafted trees, seeking out the smallest sizes possible, both to reduce costs and to have the option of training and shaping the tree prior to planting. These will be up-potted to a larger size (typically 5 gal.) and grown on for a year while the infrastructure is built. When ready, the tree will be planted into a hole dug slightly larger than the pot size, taking care not to plant it too high or too deep. The plant is then watered in thoroughly and mulched to prevent weed competition. No fertilizer is to be placed in the planting hole; the first fertilization takes place after the tree begins actively growing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Citrus Variety Collection – Honey mandarin

 

#17A-c :: Citrus reticulata cv. ‘Daisy’ (Mandarin)

Citrus, reticulata, cv., ‘Daisy’, Mandarin, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe Daisy mandarin is a cross between the ‘Fortune’ and ‘Fremont’ mandarins, and is considered superior to both. Daisy was named officially by Dowlin Young of Young’s Nursery in Thermal, California, after his wife. The tree produces a heavy crop and the fruit is borne in clusters at the ends of the vigorous branches. The fruit hang on the tree for a fair duration of time without suffering flavor loss.

The fruit of the ‘Daisy’ is a medium-large mid-season mandarin grown under California conditions. As with most mandarins, the fruit peels and sections moderately well. The fruit are moderately seedy, have an average of one to three seeds per fruit section, and have an attractive dark orange rind. The acid level of the pulp does not decline significantly as the fruit ages on the tree.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the ‘Daisy” mandarin on the upper tier of the west planting slope next to the ‘Honey’, which has similar cultural requirements, and so its fragrance can be enjoyed in the seating area.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Citrus is most efficiently fed through foliar spraying
  • Citrus trees require attention to pH and micronutrients
  • They can become chlorotic on alkaline soils and like iron supplements
  • The trees are subtropical and can withstand some light frost and drought
  • ‘Daisy’ should be pruned lightly after fruit harvest to stimulate regular bearing
  • Citrus has an extensive system of feeder roots, and benefits greatly from mulch
  • Irrigation should be reduced at ripening to avoid the fruit splitting common to this variety
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as small grafted trees, seeking out the smallest sizes possible, both to reduce costs and to have the option of training and shaping the tree prior to planting. These will be up-potted to a larger size (typically 5 gal.) and grown on for a year while the infrastructure is built. When ready, the tree will be planted into a hole dug slightly larger than the pot size, taking care not to plant it too high or too deep. The plant is then watered in thoroughly and mulched to prevent weed competition. No fertilizer is to be placed in the planting hole; the first fertilization takes place after the tree begins actively growing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Citrus Variety Collection – Daisy mandarin

 

#17A-d:: Citrus sinensis cv. ‘Lane Late’ (Navel Orange)

Citrus, sinensis cv., Lane,Late, Navel, Orange, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe ‘Lane Late” navel orange was discovered in Australia as a bud sport of a ‘Washington’ orange. The tree characteristics are very similar to the ‘Washington” navel. Fruits are a similar size and shape, but with smoother skin and a smaller navel. The fruit matures four to six weeks later than ‘Washington’ navel and can remain on the tree for several months after ripening.

The fruit of the ‘Lane Late’ is typically seedless, has a thinner rind than ‘Washington’ and has a lighter orange rind. The rind is firmer than ‘Washington’ which allows ‘Lane Late’ to handle and ship well. The flesh has less juice and is lower in both sugar and acidity than ‘Washington’. Juice quality is good due to low levels of limonin, a bitter compound, in the fresh juice.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the ‘Lane Late’ orange in the upper tier of the west planting slope, near the other Citrus which have similar cultural requirements. Its fragrance can be enjoyed in the seating area.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Citrus is most efficiently fed through foliar spraying
  • Citrus trees require attention to pH and micronutrients
  • Most citrus fruit can hang on the tree for many weeks after maturity
  • They can become chlorotic on alkaline soils and like iron supplements
  • The trees are subtropical and can withstand some light frost and drought
  • Citrus has an extensive system of feeder roots, and benefits greatly from mulch
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as small grafted trees, seeking out the smallest sizes possible, both to reduce costs and to have the option of training and shaping the tree prior to planting. These will be up-potted to a larger size (typically 5 gal.) and grown on for a year while the infrastructure is built. When ready, the tree will be planted into a hole dug slightly larger than the pot size, taking care not to plant it too high or too deep. The plant is then watered in thoroughly and mulched to prevent weed competition. No fertilizer is to be placed in the planting hole; the first fertilization takes place after the tree begins actively growing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Citrus Variety Collection – Lane Late

 

#17A-e :: Citrus aurantifolia cv. ‘Mexican’ (Lime)

Citrus aurantifolia, cv., ‘Mexican’ Lime, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe ‘Mexican’ lime is also called the Key lime, bartenders lime, and West Indian lime. The tree is actually native to the Himalayas, but has been spread to warm climates worldwide. It is moderately vigorous and medium sized, usually 15 feet or less. The leaves are broadly lanceolate with a distinct winged petiole and distinctive aroma. New growth is purple colored fading to green.

The fruit is small, round to oval, and sometimes showing a small neck with an occasional nipple at the tip. The rind is dark green, fading to a lighter green at maturity with occasional touches of yellow. The flesh is green to greenish-yellow, highly acidic and possessing a strong distinctive aroma. The fruits of the lime have the habit, unusual for citrus, of dropping from the tree when ripe.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the ‘Mexican’ lime in the upper tier of the west slope planting with other citrus as they share similar cultural considerations. Its fragrance can be enjoyed in the seating area.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Citrus is most efficiently fed through foliar spraying
  • Citrus trees require attention to pH and micronutrients
  • The trees are subtropical and can withstand some light frost and drought
  • They can become chlorotic on alkaline soils and like iron and micronutrients
  • Citrus has an extensive system of feeder roots, and benefits greatly from mulch
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as small grafted trees, seeking out the smallest sizes possible, both to reduce costs and to have the option of training and shaping the tree prior to planting. These will be up-potted to a larger size (typically 5 gal.) and grown on for a year while the infrastructure is built. When ready, the tree will be planted into a hole dug slightly larger than the pot size, taking care not to plant it too high or too deep. The plant is then watered in thoroughly and mulched to prevent weed competition. No fertilizer is to be placed in the planting hole; the first fertilization takes place after the tree begins actively growing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Citrus Variety Collection – Mexican lime

 

#17A-f :: Fortunella cv. ‘Nagami’ (Kumquat)

Fortunella cv., ‘Nagami’, Kumquat, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe ‘Nagami’ kumquat is variously placed in genus Fortunella or genus Citrus, scientists have yet to agree. For practical purposes it can be thought of as a citrus. The tree is among the smallest of citrus, rarely exceeding 8 feet. It is also among the hardiest, withstanding short bouts of 14F which would kill other citrus. The tree readily hybridizes with other citrus, supporting its inclusion there.

The fruit of the kumquat is unique among citrus in having a sweet peel, and enclosing tart flesh. The fruit is often eaten whole to take advantage of the sweet skin, and are commonly preserved. To avoid damaging the peel, they are usually harvested with a bit of stem attached. The tree is among the most cold hardy of the citrus types. The plants enter a deep dormancy at the onset of winter.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the ‘Nagami’ kumquat on the upper tier of the west planting slope at the south end of the other citrus plantings since it is the shortest and will shade them the least.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Citrus is most efficiently fed through foliar spraying
  • These trees require attention to pH and micronutrients
  • Most citrus fruit can hang on the tree for many weeks after maturity
  • The trees are subtropical and can withstand some light frost and drought
  • They can become chlorotic on alkaline soils and like iron and micronutrients
  • Citrus has an extensive system of feeder roots, and benefits greatly from mulch
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as small grafted trees, seeking out the smallest sizes possible, both to reduce costs and to have the option of training and shaping the tree prior to planting. These will be up-potted to a larger size (typically 5 gal.) and grown on for a year while the infrastructure is built. When ready, the tree will be planted into a hole dug slightly larger than the pot size, taking care not to plant it too high or too deep. The plant is then watered in thoroughly and mulched to prevent weed competition. No fertilizer is to be placed in the planting hole; the first fertilization takes place after the tree begins actively growing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Kumquat

 

#17A-g :: Citrus X cv. ‘Oroblanco’

Citrus X cv. ‘Oroblanco’ grapefruit, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe ‘Oroblanco’ grapefruit is actually a cross between a white grapefruit and a pummelo. For practical purposes it can be thought of and treated as a grapefruit. The tree has a spreading form and can reach 20-30 feet, but is much smaller (generally 8-15 ft) on dwarfing rootstock. The fruit tend to be borne in clusters like grapes; this is the etymology of the name ‘grapefruit’.

The fruit of the ‘Oroblanco’ is larger than a standard grapefruit, with the thicker rind of the pummelo. The flesh is an off white color and the rind is yellow at maturity. The flavor is sweeter, with none of the bitterness found in most grapefruit. Ripe fruit hold very well on the tree, and can be harvested over a period of months. The oroblanco does not need as many heat units to ripen as grapefruit.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the ‘Oroblanco’ grapefruit at the west end of the lower tier of slope plantings, where the higher roof profile can accommodate its size.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Citrus is most efficiently fed through foliar spraying
  • Citrus trees require attention to pH and micronutrients
  • Most citrus fruit can hang on the tree for many weeks after maturity
  • The trees are subtropical and can withstand some light frost and drought
  • They can become chlorotic on alkaline soils and like iron and micronutrients
  • Citrus has an extensive system of feeder roots and benefits greatly from mulch
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as small grafted trees, seeking out the smallest sizes possible, both to reduce costs and to have the option of training and shaping the tree prior to planting. These will be up-potted to a larger size (typically 5 gal.) and grown on for a year while the infrastructure is built. When ready, the tree will be planted into a hole dug slightly larger than the pot size, taking care not to plant it too high or too deep. The plant is then watered in thoroughly and mulched to prevent weed competition. No fertilizer is to be placed in the planting hole; the first fertilization takes place after the tree begins actively growing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Oroblanco

 

#18A :: Fragaria sp. (Alpine Strawberries)

Fragaria sp., Strawberry, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Fragaria hybrids are cosmopolitan herbaceous perennials in the Rose family. The modern strawberry arose early in the 20th Century as a chance cross. The fruits are very nutritious, and the leaves are used for a medicinal tea reputed to be beneficial for pregnant and nursing women. Modern day-neutral varieties are nearly everbearing in frost free climates. Fruits are eaten fresh or frozen, and made into jam.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow strawberries in the middle tier of the slope plantings towards the western end, and also grow runnerless alpine strawberries along the base of the tree row along the north wall.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Strawberries need high fertility, but excess nitrogen reduces fruit set
  • Plants are best fed with compost and well-decomposed poultry manure
  • They can continue to bear fruit through fall and winter if they do not freeze
  • Plants can show boron deficiencies in some soils, seaweed sprays can treat this
  • Day-neutral cultivars have been bred so they do not enter dormancy after the equinox
PLANTING GUIDELINES

Strawberries are usually received as small plantlets or crowns, and should be planted where they are to grow immediately. If this is not possible they can be heeled in to moist sawdust or sphagnum and held for 1-3 weeks but may suffer setback when finally planted out. Plants should be placed 8-12 inches apart in a rich well worked soil, watered in well and mulched.

Alpine strawberries are treated somewhat differently, since they do not produce runners. They are planted much closer together; individual plants will enlarge from the root crowns over time, but tolerate crowding well. They also benefit greatly from mulch, as well as some shade.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Fragaria

 

#19A :: Musa (Banana, Plantain)

Musa, banana, plantain, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodBananas are herbaceous perennials in the Musaceae native to southern Asia. Most cultivated forms are seedless and are propagated from vegetative offsets. Each of the plants pseudostems will produce a large fruit bunch once, and then it dies and is removed. Dwarf varieties range from 4 to 8 feet in height. Stems cut after fruit production can be used as mulch, and make excellent animal fodder.

Banana fruit vary greatly in texture, color and flavor. Some, like the plantains, are best eaten baked or fried, while dessert types are eaten fresh. Bananas are high in potassium and soluble fiber. In the Philippines, the male flower bud is cooked and eaten like artichokes, and in East Africa the stems are processed for starch. Globally, bananas are one of the top three fruits in production volume.

PLACEMENTS

Dwarf bananas will be planted at the east and west ends of the lower tier of the planting slope in order to minimize their shade effect.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Each clump should only be allowed to carry three stems at any one time
  • The plants are heavy feeders, and require frequent applications of N and K
  • Each pseudostem bears fruit once and is cut down, followed by the next pup
  • The male flower should be removed once all the hands have set on the bunch
  • Fruit bunches should be left on the plant until the first hand colors, then cut that stem
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted corms. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Banana

 

#20A :: Sauropus (Sweet Leaf, Katuk)

Sauropus, Sweet Leaf, Katuk, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Sauropus is an upright small shrub from southeast Asia in the Euphorbiaceae. They are found naturally in the rainforest understory, and can withstand deep shade. The tender new tip growth and leaves are eaten raw or steamed and taste like snow peas. Sweet leaf is high in protein, vitamins and minerals. The flower is 4-petaled reddish-brown, and borne in the leaf axils, followed by a white fruit.

PLACEMENTS

In the Aquapini, Sauropus will be planted in the lower tier of the slope plantings, close to the east wall where there will be more shade.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plants will grow in neutral to acid soils
  • Tender growing tips are stimulated by heavy feeding and watering
  • Since the branches grow vertically, Katuk can be densely planted
  • Partial to deep shade is best, as the growing tips get fibrous in full sun
  • The plants require steady moisture and will tolerate temporary flooding
  • Sauropus are easily propagated from cuttings, which will root directly in the ground
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Sauropus as rooted cuttings. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Sauropus

 

#21A :: Derris sp. (Tuba Root)

Derris sp.,Tuba Root, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Derris is a genus of tropical vines, shrubs, and trees in the Leguminosae. These woody vines have bright green leaves and white flowers borne along the main stem. They contain a compound called rotenone, which is a strong insecticide and fish poison. The plants are very effective companion plants; it is often only necessary to put the cut foliage around crops to repel insects. They also fix nitrogen in the soil, adding to fertility.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Derris in the middle tier of the slope planting against the east wall, so we will always have it available for spot infestations in the Aquapini.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are pest free but can get root rot if grown in wet soils
  • Since they fix nitrogen, the plants do not require added fertilizers
  • Shrub or tree species can also be pruned and used as pesticidal mulch
  • The vining species can smother adjacents plants and should be pruned
  • Plant is poisonous to humans and fish, avoid contaminating bodies of water
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seed. Derris seeds should be planted in a nursery pot and kept warm and moist until germination. When the first pair of true leaves emerges, they should be dibbled into 1 gal. pots and grown on until a good root system develops. Then they can be planted in the location indicated on the planting plan, and watered in well.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Derris

 

#22A :: Houttuynia cordata (Vap Ca)

Houttuynia cordata, Vap Ca, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Houttuynia cordata is a fast-growing, herbaceous perennial plant from S.E. Asia. It is a low, creeping, mat-forming herb that spreads by rhizomes. Both the leaves and the rhizomes are used in Asian cooking. They have a distinctive spicy flavor that goes well in a variety of dishes. The plant is also used medicinally to treat lung infections and also used as an antiviral, antibacterial, and a general detoxifier.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Houttuynia in one of the growing beds along the north wall where it will benefit from the shade of the fruit trees.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant prefers at least some shade, and will not withstand frost
  • Cultivation in the planting bed will assist in harvesting the thin rhizomes
  • Plants prefers abundant moisture, and can grow in standing water or wet soil
  • In areas of regular rainfall the plant has escaped cultivation and is considered weedy
  • We will keep Houttuynia in the planting bed until its weedy potential can be assessed
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Houttuynia cordata

 

#23A-a :: Zingiber officinale (Ginger)

Zingiber officinale, Ginger, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Ginger is a tropical herbaceous briefly deciduous perennial in the Zingiberaceae native to Asia. The pseudostems arise from underground rhizomes, which are the part usually used. They have been grown for thousands of years for their hot aromatic flavor, used both as a culinary ingredient and medicinally. The rhizomes contain complex essential oils and oleoresins and the inner pseudostems are sometimes eaten.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow ginger in the west end of the south slope planting, as an understory to the taller plants.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Feed and water only when growth begins in spring
  • Gingers have few insect pests but several fungal diseases
  • They require warmth, shade, moisture, fertile soil and good drainage
  • Do not over fertilize, several light feedings are preferable to one heavy feeding
  • During the winter season the plants become dormant and must be allowed to dry out
PLANTING GUIDELINES

These plants will be received as rhizomes, which should be be planted immediately in a light well draining mix in a pot just big enough to accommodate it. Water only sparingly until vegetative growth begins. At that point the plant can be planted in its permanent location. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin. When foliage dies down in autumn, cease feeding and allow the plants to dry out as they are dormant and do not require much water.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Ginger

 

#23A-b Alpinia galanga (Greater Galanga)

 Alpinia galanga, Greater Galanga, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Galanga is a tropical herbaceous briefly deciduous perennial in the Zingiberaceae native to Asia. The pseudostems arise from underground rhizomes, which are the part usually used. They have been grown for thousands of years for their hot aromatic flavor, used both as a culinary ingredient and medicinally. The rhizomes contain complex essential oils and oleoresins and the inner pseudostems are sometimes eaten.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow galanga on the west end of the second tier slope plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Feed and water only when growth begins in spring
  • Galanga have few insect pests but several fungal diseases
  • They require warmth, shade, moisture, fertile soil and good drainage
  • Do not over fertilize, several light feedings are preferable to one heavy feeding
  • During the winter season the plants become dormant, and must be allowed to dry out
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive this plant as a rhizome which should be planted immediately in a light well draining mix in a pot just big enough to accommodate it. Water only sparingly until vegetative growth begins. At that point the plant can be planted in its permanent location. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin. When foliage dies down in autumn, cease feeding and allow the plants to dry out as they are dormant and do not require much water.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Alpinia galanga

 

#23A-c Cucurma longa (Turmeric)

Cucurma longa, Turmeric, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Turmeric is a tropical herbaceous briefly deciduous perennial in the Zingiberaceae native to Asia. The pseudostems arise from underground rhizomes, which are the part usually used. They have been grown for thousands of years for their hot aromatic flavor, used both as a culinary ingredient and medicinally. The rhizomes contain complex essential oils and oleoresins and the inner pseudostems are sometimes eaten.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow turmeric near the east end of the middle tier of the slope plantings where its low growth habit will cast minimum shade.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Feed and water only when growth begins in spring
  • Turmeric have few insect pests but several fungal diseases
  • They require warmth, shade, moisture, fertile soil and good drainage
  • Do not over fertilize, several light feedings are preferable to one heavy feeding
  • During the winter season the plants become dormant, and must be allowed to dry out
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive this plant as a rhizome which should be planted immediately in a light well draining mix in a pot just big enough to accommodate it. Water only sparingly until vegetative growth begins. At that point the plant can be planted in its permanent location. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin. When foliage dies down in autumn, cease feeding and allow the plants to dry out as they are dormant and do not require much water.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Turmeric

 

#24A-a :: Piper nigrum (Black Pepper)

Piper nigrum, black pepper, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Black pepper is a vining herbaceous plant in the Piperaceae, native to India and S.E Asia. It has been cultivated for thousands of years for the dried seeds which are used as a spice. Vines will grow from 10 to 15 feet tall and will naturally be found growing on the trunks of trees due to their need for a support structure. Black and white pepper come from the same plant, but are picked at different stages.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow black pepper at the east end of the lower tier of the slope planting where it will benefit from the shade of the ‘Oroblanco’ tree and may climb it as a companion plant.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Black pepper needs excellent drainage
  • Plants prefer high humidity throughout the year
  • Plants appreciate partial shade and indirect light
  • Fertilize lightly every month and cut back at flowering
  • The plants are truly tropical and do best between 55F – 90F
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. The rooted cuttings can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Black Pepper

 

#24A-b :: Piper methysticum (Kava)

Piper methysticum, Kava, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Kava is a multi-stemmed herbaceous perennial in the Piperaceae native to the South Pacific Islands. It has been cultivated there for thousands of years, and is in fact an anthropomorphic species. The plants can reach ten feet but are usually harvested for their roots before this. The roots are made into the ceremonial beverage kava which is used as a relaxant throughout the Pacific.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow kava at the west end of the lower tier of the slope planting near the ‘Oroblanco’ tree.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Kava does best with partial shade
  • Kava needs constant moisture and perfect drainage
  • Plants are harvested for their roots after three to five years
  • Plants need high humidity; leaves burn badly in dry climates
  • Kava is propagated by rooted stem cuttings, the plant produces no seed
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. The rooted cuttings can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Kava

 

#24A-c :: Piper lolot (lolot)

Piper lolot, lolot, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Piper lolot is a tropical vining herbaceous perennial native to Southeast Asia. It is cultivated for its leaves, which are used as an edible green, and as a wrap for other foods. The seed pods are also used locally as a spice. The plants are used in traditional medicine treating disorders from inflammation to snakebites. Scientist have found that the plant does indeed have a number of biologically active compounds.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow lolot in the west end of the lower tier slope planting where it will benefit from the shade of the ‘Oroblanco’ tree.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants prefer shade and high humidity
  • Pipers respond well to rich soils and fertilizer
  • Lolot is truly tropical and will not tolerate frost
  • The plant is propagated from seeds or cuttings
  • Plants grow vigorously and may become invasive
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. The rooted cuttings can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Lolot

 

#25A :: Pachyrhizus (Jicama)

Pachyrhizus, Jicama, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Jicama is a root vegetable in the legume family native to Mexico, where it has been cultivated for centuries. The plant is a twining vine that sprawls across the ground or climbs nearby plants. The vines make an effective living mulch. The edible tubers have a crisp, juicy texture and are eaten raw or cooked. They are good companion plants that fix nitrogen and have foliage that contains rotenone, a natural insecticide.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow jicama in the upper tier of the planting slope near the east wall, since it is low growing and will cast minimal shade.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plants are generally pest and disease free
  • Tuber formation doesn’t begin until the equinox
  • Jicama requires a long frost-free growing season
  • Plants will grow in any soil but require good drainage
  • The seed pods and seeds are toxic and dangerous to eat
  • Tubers may be stored in the the ground but eventually become woody
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seed. Seeds should be planted in a nursery pot and kept warm and moist until germination. When the first pair of true leaves emerges, they should be dibbled into 1 gal. pots and grown on until a good root system develops. Then they can be planted in the location indicated on the planting plan, and watered in well.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Pachyrhizus

 

#26A :: Heliopsis (Chilcuague)

Heliopsis, Chilcuague, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Chilcuague is an herbaceous perennial in the sunflower family native to Mexico. This plant has been severely over collected, threatening the species. The roots are used as a natural insecticide, in herbal medicine as an immune system stimulant similar to echinacea, and as a strong topical anaesthetic. The plants will stand dry conditions and they make an excellent companion plant.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow chilcuague in the lower tier of the slope plantings for convenient harvesting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are easily propagated from crown divisions
  • Cultural requirements outside of Mexico are not fully known
  • It may be that the plant could overwinter outdoors at the property
  • Limiting factors outdoors will be its tolerance to cold and winter moisture
  • In Mexico the plant is adapted to heat and seasonally wet-dry conditions
  • In the highlands of Mexico it seems to grow in soils similar to the property
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as small divisions. The rooted cuttings can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Heliopsis

 

#27A :: Carica sp. (Papaya)

Carica sp., Papaya, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodCarica sp. is a single-stemmed tropical herbaceous perennial native to the tropics where they have been grown for centuries. Papaya trees have a vertical growth habit, with flowers and fruit borne just beneath the leafy crown. They can be highly productive, yielding hundreds of fruits over their 5 to 7 year lifespan. The plant is used commercially as a meat tenderizer and has many medicinal uses as well.

The fruit of the papaya is oblong, from 1 to 10 lbs, and yellow to orange in color. Inside is a thick layer of highly nutritious, juicy, flesh surrounding a central cavity containing numerous brown to black seeds. The flesh is golden to pink/red in color with a soft melon-like texture and a unique rich flavor that is generally liked by most who try it. The seeds are sometimes added to salads for their hot, spicy flavor.

PLACEMENTS

In the Aquapini we will spot papayas into different locations on the west end of the slope plantings to take advantage of light wells between larger plants.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are generally replaced when they get too tall
  • They grow in tropical climates and are intolerant of frost
  • Plants are susceptible to Papaya Ringspot Virus (PRV)
  • Plants are considered dioecious but hermaphroditic forms are known
  • They like adequate moisture, but require excellent drainage to avoid root rot
  • Plants that grow too tall for convenient harvest can be cut; new shoots will form
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seed which should be sown in a nursery tray and kept warm and moist until germination. When plants are 2-3” tall, dibble into 1 gal pots and grow on until plants have developed a good root system, then transplant where they are to stand. Wait to fertilize until plants show signs of active growth.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Carica

 

#28A :: Mentha (Mints)

Mentha, mints, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Mentha are herbaceous perennials with distinctive aromas and flavors due to their essential oil content. Each clone or chemovar has a unique blend of chemicals, resulting in its unique flavor and aroma. Mints are excellent companion plants, especially for their ability to repel pest insects and attract beneficial ones. They have many medicinal, cosmetic, and culinary uses and are found worldwide.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow mints in the lower tier of the planting slope near the seating area so everyone can enjoy their fragrance.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants like partial shade to full sun
  • Many will withstand some frost, regrowing from the roots
  • Heat and sunlight bring out the highest levels of essential oils
  • In moist conditions mint roots can spread and become weedy
  • Mints are moisture loving and should not be allowed to dry out
  • Mints will grow in poor soil, but respond well to fertile conditions
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. The rooted cuttings can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Mentha

 

#29A :: Azadirachta indica (Neem)

Azadirachta indica, Neem, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Neem is a tree in the Meliaceae native to India and is one of the important trees in that country. It grows to 40 feet but can tolerate being sheared into a small bush. All parts of the plant have insecticidal, fungicidal, and medicinal properties due to the presence of limonoids. Azadirachta indica can adapt to desert environments, but thrive in the wet tropics. The tree yields a valuable timber like mahogany.

PLACEMENTS

We will place  neem at the bottom of the slope towards the corner where its shade effect can be minimized. Its leaves can quickly be made into a spray for spot treatment of pest outbreaks in the Aquapini.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Neem’s presence is often enough to deter insects from feeding
  • The tree is not cold tolerant, and can only take a few degrees of frost
  • Trees can survive in areas of 8” annual rainfall, but grow in areas of 100” also
  • Dried neem leaves are placed in containers of dried grains and beans to deter pests
  • Neem’s compounds are also toxic to fish, so must not be allowed into the culture ponds
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive this plant as seed. Seeds have very short viability and must be immediately sown in a nursery flat and kept warm and moist until germination, and then dibbled into individual 1 gal. pots until a good root system forms. They can then be transplanted where they are to stand.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Neem

 

#30A :: Moringa (Malungay)

Moringa, malungay, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodMoringa, belonging to the Moringaceae family, is grown in the drier regions of Africa, Madagascar, and India. When raised for food they are usually grown as shrubs to aid in harvesting. The leaves, unripe pods, and flowers are all eaten and are high in protein and vitamins. The plants have soft succulent stems and branches, and can resist prolonged droughts.

The leaves are harvested and cooked at any stage. The green pods are harvested when they will still “snap” like green beans and cooked. Seeds from overmature pods can be used until they turn yellow and begin to harden. The pods are twisted open and the seeds removed and blanched to remove any bitterness. They can then be boiled, steamed, or stir fried in the same way as peas.

PLACEMENTS

Moringa will be planted in the middle tier of the slope planting against the west wall to minimize its shade effect. We are choosing a variety that has been developed for greater branching and heavier leaf production.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant needs to be kept above 32F
  • The plants are easily grown from seed or cuttings
  • The trees can stand much drought, but are frost sensitive
  • Seeds are best eaten in the half-ripe stage, and are cooked like peas
  • For leaf production the plant should be cut to stimulate more branching
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. The rooted cuttings can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Moringa

 

#31A :: Ipomea batatas (Sweet Potato)

Ipomea batatas, Sweet Potato, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Ipomea batatas are extremely productive vining plants in the Convolvulaceae, yielding more food per square foot than almost any other tropical vegetable. They are native to warm regions of the American tropics, but have become an important crop worldwide. Sweet potatoes require a long growing season to produce their abundant tubers underneath long vines. The vine tips are also eaten as a vegetable.

PLACEMENTS

In the Aquapini we will grow sweet potatoes in the upper tier of the slope plantings since their low growth habit will cast minimal shade.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plants are generally pest free
  • Vines will grow in any well-drained soil
  • If aluminum is present in the soil, lime must be added
  • Vines grow vigorously and eliminate weed competition
  • The vines are propagated from tuber roots called “slips”
  • In tropical climates the tubers can remain in the ground until needed
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted slips. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. In hot weather it may help to shade the slips for a few days after transplanting. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Sweet Potato

 

#32A :: Dioscorea (Yams)

Dioscorea,Yams, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Yams are vining perennial plants in the Dioscoreaceae that are native throughout the warm temperate and tropical regions worldwide. They produce abundant edible tubers at the end of the growing season and are a staple of many cultures. They can be fried, grilled, baked, boiled, barbecued, smoked, and roasted. Tubers can reach enormous size if not harvested for food or used for the production of steroidal saponins.

PLACEMENTS

In the Aquapini we will grow yams on the middle tier of the slope plantings since their low growth habit will cast minimal shade.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The tuberous roots can be harvested at any time
  • In humid climates the vines can become rampant
  • Yams need warm temperatures and will not withstand frost
  • Some species require extensive preparation to remove saponins
  • The aerial bulbils of many species can also be cooked and eaten
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seed or small tubers. Seed should be planted in a nursery tray and kept warm and moist until germination. Seedlings should be dibbled into individual 4” pots until a good root system forms, then planted where they are to stand. Small tubers can be planted immediately where they are to grow.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Yams

 

#33A :: Momordica grosvenori (Luo Han Guo)

Momordica grosvenori, Luo Han Guo, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Luo han guo is a tropical perennial vine in the Cucurbitaceae native to southern China. The vines reach up to 15 feet in length and bear narrow heart-shaped leaves. It is cultivated for its fruits, which contain compounds called mogrosides, that are 300 times sweeter than sugar. The fruits are 3.5 to 5 inches in diameter and are a bronze color when ripe. The pulp is eaten fresh, or more commonly dried and used as a sweetener.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Luo Han Guo on the upper tier of the slope plantings where its low growth habit will cast minimal shade.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plants will not tolerate frost
  • Plants do best with partial shade
  • Enjoy warmth and moisture but dislike high heat or drought
  • The vigorous vines are trellised or can be left to sprawl on the ground
  • Seeds have delayed germination and may take several months to sprout
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seed. The seeds should be individually sown in tall nursery tubes, as the deep tuberous root develops before the seedling appears above the soil. Once the plants are 8-12” tall they may be planted where they are to stand.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Luo Han Guo

 

#34A :: Capsicum (Chile Peppers)

Capsicum, Chile Peppers, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Capsicum belongs to the Solanaceae and are related to tomatoes, eggplants, and tobacco. They are native to the American tropics and have been cultivated for thousands of years. All Capsicums contain a compound, capsaicin, which is responsible for the spicy effect. The fruits are highly nutritious and rich in vitamin C and carotenoids. They are tender perennials usually grown as annuals.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow chile peppers on the upper tier of the slope plantings where their low growth habit will cast minimum shade.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants prefer a fertile well amended soil
  • Plants are self fertile but bees will increase yields
  • Peppers are subject to fungal diseases in some areas
  • Plants like adequate moisture and are frost intolerant
  • The spiciness of peppers is measured in Scoville units
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seed. Seeds should be sown in a nursery flat and kept warm and moist until germination, and then dibbled into individual 2-4” pots until a good root system forms. They can then be transplanted where they are to stand. Depending on the variety, they should be spaced from 10 to 24” apart.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Chili Peppers

 

#35A :: Cyperus esculentus (Chufa)

Cyperus esculentus, Chufa, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Chufa is a plant in the sedge family which occurs in boggy places worldwide. The evergreen plant often forms large colonies at the edges of marshes, lakes, and other bodies of water. The stolons produce small tubers along their length. These are eaten or pressed for the milky juice, called horchata in Spain. Tubers are high in protein and an edible oil, and the presscake can be dried into flour.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow chufa in the lower tier planting area between the seating area and the Pond; it will share this area with two other moisture-loving species, Gunnera and Eleocharis, as a guide.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • If grown on dry soils they need frequent irrigation
  • The plants need little fertilizer or care once established
  • Chufas prefer standing water or moist waterlogged soil
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as tubers. The tubers can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. They should be kept constantly moist until growth appears.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Chufa

 

#36A :: Ananas (Pineapple)

Ananas, Pineapple, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The pineapple is a terrestrial bromeliad native to South America. The plant produces an aggregate fruit surrounding a central stem. The fruit contains an enzyme, bromelain, that aids digestion. The leaves are used to make a very fine fiber that was an important export of the Philippines. Plants are propagated from vegetative offsets of cultivated varieties or from tissue culture.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow pineapples in the middle tier of the slope plantings, where they will benefit from the drainage and sunny exposure.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are generally pest free
  • Pineapples will grow in any soil
  • Pineapples grow in partial shade to full sun
  • When plants reach full size they can be induced to fruit with ethylene
  • Plants withstand dry periods but for best fruit production require regular watering
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted offsets or tissue cultures. The rooted offsets can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Tissue cultures should be removed from the flask, their roots carefully washed free of media, potted in a light mix in 6” pots and watered in well. When plants have developed a full root system they can be planted where they are to stand.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Ananas

 

#37A :: Ipomea aquatica (Kang-kong)

Ipomea aquatica, Kang-kong, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Kang-kong is a vining herbaceous perennial in the Convolvulaceae native to Asia. The plant is used as edible greens, boiled or stir-fried.  The plant has a very rapid growth rate; 16 tons per acre in three cuttings is recorded. Because of its rapid growth it is considered a weed in the southern US, with steps taken to eradicate it. It is grown in fish ponds and chopped and used as fish food.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow kang-kong in the west end of the lower tier of the slope plantings in the shade of larger plants.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants prefer full sun for best growth
  • Propagation is by stem cuttings or seed
  • The plants are generally pest and disease free
  • The plant grows in wet soils or in standing water
  • The plants need warm conditions and will not stand frost
  • Cook seeds to eliminate any risk of infection by the parasite Fasciolopsis buski
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. The rooted cuttings can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Kang-kong

 

#38A :: Eleocharis (Water Chestnut)

Eleocharis, Water Chestnut, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Water chestnut is a sedge that grows in shallow water or the muddy soil along waterways. The stolons form nutritious tubers, rich in B-vitamins, with a sweet crisp texture. They have long been popular in Asian cuisine and have been extensively cultivated  for centuries. The tubers remain crisp after cooking due to the unusual cellular structure of cross-linked oligomers of ferulic acid.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow water chestnut  in the lower tier of the east slope planting between the seating area and the pond, together with Gunnera and Cyperus as a moisture – loving guide.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are generally pest free
  • Plants are carefree once established
  • Tubers are harvested in the fall when the plants die down
  • The plants are propagated from crown divisions or from tubers
  • Plants should be grown in mud rich in organic matter for tuber production
  • Cook seeds to eliminate any risk of infection by the parasite Fasciolopsis buski
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as tubers. The tubers should be planted immediately in a heavy rich soil containing some clay in 6” pots and kept moist until growth begins. They can then be transplanted where they are to stand.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Water Chestnut

 

#39A :: Gunnera tinctoria (Panque)

Gunnera tinctoria, Panque, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Panque is a large herbaceous perennial in the Gunneraceae native to Chile. The family Gunneraceae is one of the oldest living terrestrial families. The leaves are three feet across, and the leaf stalks can reach 8 feet. These stalks are peeled and eaten like rhubarb by the Mapuche culture in its native region. The stalks are sold by street vendors in Southern Chile, and are said to be delicious.

PLACEMENTS

We will plant the panque at the bottom of the west slope between the seating area and the Triangle Pond. The plant will benefit from the humidity provided by the pond, and the leaves will shade the seating area.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants have sharp spines, use care when handling
  • Gunneras prefer cool weather but are burned to the ground by frost
  • Plants propagate by dividing the rhizomes in the winter/early spring
  • In cool wet climates the plant can self seed and could be potentially invasive
  • Gunneras like constant moisture, and constant cool temperatures above freezing
  • Gunnera species have endophytic Nostoc cyanobacteria that aid the plants nutrition
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive this plant as a rhizome cutting. The rhizome cuttings can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. It must not be allowed to get too dry for too long at this stage or it may die. When the plant shows signs of growth, begin regular light applications of a balanced fertilizer.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Gunnera tinctoria

 

POND PLANTS

#40A :: Euryale ferox (Foxnut, Nikori)

Euryale ferox, Foxnut, Nikori, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Euryale ferox is a floating aquatic annual in the Nyphaeaceae.  It has been grown in Asia for thousands of years for its edible seeds. The seeds are starchy and nutritious and are also used in Chinese medicine as well as Ayurveda; chemical analysis has found novel antioxidant compounds and tocopherols. The seeds are eaten raw or cooked and when fried they pop like popcorn.

PLACEMENTS

We will plant foxnut in the Triangle Pond

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The prickly capsule is harvested from just under the waters surface
  • Foxnut self sows from seed left in the pond from the previous autumn
  • In Manipur India, the fruit are harvested at two stages, ‘lolang’ and ‘aroba’
  • A foxnut pond is generally not bothered by pests; the plant’s spines protect it from fish predation
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seed. Foxnut seeds should be soaked in non-chlorinated water immediately upon receipt for 24 hours. Discard any that still float. Transfer remaining seeds to a glass quart jar ⅓ full of a sand and clay mixture, filled with fresh water. Press the seeds into the surface of the mud. Change half the water every day to avoid algae blooms and keep the jar in bright indirect light with a temperature between 70-80F. Seeds should germinate in 10 -14 days. After 3-4 leaves appear, remove plants gently from the jar taking care not to break the roots and plant in the bottom of the pond where they are to grow.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Nikori   ●  You tube – Euryale ferox 

 

#41A :: Nymphaea (Blue Lotus)

Nymphaea, Blue Lotus, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Nymphaea are aquatic plants with plate-like leaves and vibrant flowers found in bodies of freshwater around the world. The young leaves, unopened flowers, seeds and tubers, are eaten and also have many medicinal uses as immune boosters, antioxidants, etc. The plants are highly ornamental and are common in water gardens. The hardy species can overwinter in the water as long as the temperature stays above freezing.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Nymphaea in the aquapini pond.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • There are “crawlers” and “clumpers”
  • “Crawlers” spread faster, but flower less
  • “Clumpers” form a larger plant and flower more freely
  • Plants should be grown in 1-2’ of water to optimize blooming
  • The tropical species require water of 70F or above for growth
  • Soil should not be too rich, plants may rot or fail to bloom as much
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as tubers. Tubers can either be planted directly into the mud at the bottom of the pond where they are to grow, or potted up in a sand and clay mixture, and the pots slowly settled into the pond to avoid “floating” the tubers out of the pot. If using potted culture, it is best to initially submerge the pot only 6” to 1’ below the water until the first leaves reach the surface; then gradually sink the pot deeper until it is at 2’ or more.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Nymphaealue

#42A :: Nelumbo (Lotus Root)

Nelumbo, Lotus Root, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Nelumbo, also known as “The Sacred Lotus,” is a small genus of two aquatic plants, N. nucifera and N. lutea, native to Asia and America respectively. The average plant grows to a height of 150 cm and a horizontal spread up to 3 meters. The entire plant is harvested in late summer when the seeds have matured and the flowers, seeds (cooked), leaves, and rhizomes of the lotus are all edible.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Nelumbo in the aquapini pond.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants like standing or slow moving water
  • Depth of water affects production; 3-4 feet seems best
  • Seeds have a deep dormancy and are difficult to germinate
  • Plants are most commonly propagated from rhizome divisions
  • Young Nelumbo plants can be overfertilized, which slows growth
  • Cook seeds to eliminate any risk of infection by the parasite Fasciolopsis buski
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as tubers or seed. If received as rhizomes, these can be potted and submerged or planted directly in mud of the pond. If received as seeds the hard seedcoat must be filed or cracked to allow water to enter. Once the seeds are prepared, drop them in a clear plastic cup full of non-chlorinated water. The water may turn cloudy or dark and should be changed daily. A long thin sprout should emerge in 7-30 days. The sprouted seed can then be planted in the pond bottom or potted in heavy soil and submerged in the pond.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Lotus Root

 

#43A :: Trapa (Water Caltrop)

Trapa, Water Caltrop, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Water caltrop is a floating annual aquatic plant native to Eurasia and Africa that grows in slow-moving water up to 5 meters deep. The plants were a common food in Europe until the 20th century, but now are rare. They bear ornately shaped fruits containing a single very large starchy seed. Trapa has been cultivated for over 3000 years for its edible seeds. It spreads itself by the floating fruit and detached plantlets.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Trapa in the Aquapini water feature.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trapa seeds can remain viable in the pond for up to 12 years
  • Plants are propagated from seed which must be stored in water over winter
  • Cook seeds to eliminate any risk of infection by the parasite Fasciolopsis buski
  • Most seeds will sprout the following spring, but some have delayed germination
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seed. Trapa seeds left in the pond from the previous autumn normally sprout in the spring when water temperatures rise above 60F. If seeds are received from the previous year’s crop, they should be immediately sown in a pot with a clay based soil and placed in the pond where they are to grow. Germination should take place in 2 -3 weeks depending on temperature.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Water Caltrop

 

 DEEP WATER CULTURE PLANTS

The placements, cultural considerations, and planting guidelines are the same for all the deep water culture plantings. We will receive these plants as seed and will initially grow 2 or more rafts (see each of the plant #’s for specific raft amount) of each. They will be planted in 4×4 rafts floating on oxygenated water and fed by the aquaponics system. Aquaponic production begins with seedlings which are typically germinated in flats, then dibbled into individual cells and grown on until they have developed a sturdier root system. At this point they are placed into the aquaponic rafts, where they will grow until harvested. This system avoids the inefficiencies of direct-seeding into the rafts, and then having to re-seed those cells which may not germinate. The transplants provide uniform growth and maturity dates that twice-seeded rafts do not.

#44A-#45A :: Coriandrum sativum (Cilantro)

Coriandrum sativum,Cilantro, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cilantro is an herbaceous annual plant in the Umbelliferae, thought to be native to the eastern Mediterranean.  It is used as a fresh herb almost exclusively, as the flavor is lost upon drying. It’s unique fresh flavor is an indispensable ingredient in the cuisines of Asia and Latin America. If allowed to go to seed, it produces the spice coriander, which has an entirely different flavor. Studies show cilantro has many medicinal benefits.

 

#46A-#47A :: Ocimum sp. (Basil)

Ocimum sp.,Basil, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Like mints, basils are another group of herbaceous perennials in the Mint family. Also like the mints, their aromas and flavors are due to essential oils. However, the chemical makeup of the basils is very different from the mints, resulting in completely different flavors and aromas. Basils are generally tolerant of drier conditions than many mints. The leaves are used in many types of cuisine; many species are also used medicinally.

 

#48A-#51A :: Brassica oleracea (Cabbage)

aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cabbage is a leafy green vegetable closely related to broccoli, cauliflower, and brussels sprouts. Cabbage heads generally range from 1-8 lbs and can be red and purple, green, and white. This hardy vegetable is high in vitamin K and C, folate, and a good source of fiber as well.  It is used to make cole slaw, sauerkraut, and as a healthy addition to soups and salads.

 

#52A-#56A :: Brassica oleracea (Broccoli)

Brassica oleracea, Broccoli, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Broccoli, a highly nutrient-rich vegetable, has large (typically green) flower heads arranged in a tree-like fashion on branches sprouting from a thick, edible stalk. It is high in vitamin C, as well as dietary fiber and also contains multiple nutrients with potent anti-cancer properties. Broccoli is usually boiled or steamed, but may be eaten raw also. It is commonly used in salads, soups, stir fry, and casseroles.

 

#57A-#61A :: Brassica oleracea (Cauliflower)

Brassica oleracea, Cauliflower, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cauliflower is a nutritionally dense, cruciferous vegetable high in fiber, vitamin C, and B6. It may be eaten cooked, raw or pickled. It is most often served as a dipping vegetable, in soups, casseroles, or with creamy sauces. Typically only the head (the white curd) is eaten and, while white is the most common, cauliflower also comes in orange, green, and purple for added culinary variety.

 

#62A-#67A :: Brassica oleracea  (Kale)

Brassica oleracea, Acephala Group, Kale, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The kales are another variant of cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower. As a group the kales are considered botanically to be closer to the wild form of the species. They tend to be both higher in fiber than other brassicas, and also higher in nutrients. In fact, kales are considered to be the most nutritious of all greens. Due to the higher fiber content, most kale is eaten after cooking to aid digestibility.

 

#68A-#73A :: Lactuca sativa (Lettuce)

 Lactuca sativa, Lettuc, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Lettuce is a leafy herbaceous annual in the Asteraceae that has been cultivated for thousands of years. It has been bred into a wide variety of leaf shapes, textures, and colors. The bitter flavor of its wild ancestors has largely been bred out of modern lettuces. Also missing is the milky latex that gave the genus it’s name (Lactuca derives from the Latin ‘lac’ or milk). Modern forms are mild-flavored and tender.

 

#74A-#79A :: Apium graveolens (Celery)

Apium graveolens, Celery, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Celery is a succulent-stemmed biennial in the Umbelliferae native to Eurasia. It has long been cultivated in Europe; our word celery derives from the ancient Greek selinon. It is mainly grown for it’s succulent stalks and leaves, but tuberous rooted-forms are also known. The flavor of celery survives cooking, making it a popular vegetable for soups and stews. Seeds are used as a spice.

 

#80A-#81A :: Nasturtium officinale (Watercress)

Nasturtium officinale, Watercress, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Watercress is an aquatic or semi-aquatic plant in the Brassicaceae native to the marshes of Eurasia. As a member of Brassicaceae, it is related to mustard and radish, which share its spicy flavor. Watercress has hollow stems, which give it buoyancy in water, and compound pinnate leaves. Leaves are eaten fresh and the seeds are eaten spouted. The plant is highly nutritious, and has medicinal uses.

 

#82A-#85A :: Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla (Chard)

Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla, Chard, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Chard is a leafy green vegetable in the Chenopodiaceae, and is conspecific with beets (it is a non-tuberous beet). The tender young greens are eaten fresh; older leaves and stalks are cooked, which reduces their bitterness. Leaves and stems are highly nutritious, especially in vitamins A & K. Many varieties have pigmented stalks. Plants produce new stalks and leaves throughout the season.

 

SOUTH ADJACENT PLANTING ZONES

#86A-95A :: Fragaria sp. (Strawberry)

Fragaria sp., Strawberry, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Fragaria hybrids are cosmopolitan herbaceous perennials in the Rose family. The modern strawberry arose early in the 20th Century as a chance cross. The fruits are very nutritious, and the leaves are used for a medicinal tea reputed to be beneficial for pregnant and nursing women. Modern day-neutral varieties are nearly everbearing in frost free climates. Fruits are eaten fresh or frozen, and made into jam.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow runnerless alpine strawberries along the base of the tree row along the north wall and along the south side of the central deep water culture ponds to take advantage of the space and abundance of sunlight here.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Strawberries need high fertility, but excess nitrogen reduces fruit set
  • Plants are best fed with compost and well-decomposed poultry manure
  • They can continue to bear fruit through fall and winter if they do not freeze
  • Plants can show boron deficiencies in some soils, seaweed sprays can treat this
  • Day-neutral cultivars have been bred so they do not enter dormancy after the equinox
PLANTING GUIDELINES

Strawberries are usually received as small plantlets or crowns, and should be planted where they are to grow immediately. If this is not possible they can be heeled in to moist sawdust or sphagnum and held for 1-3 weeks but may suffer setback when finally planted out. Plants should be placed 8-12 inches apart in a rich well worked soil, watered in well and mulched.

Alpine strawberries are treated somewhat differently, since they do not produce runners. They are planted much closer together; individual plants will enlarge from the root crowns over time, but tolerate crowding well. They also benefit greatly from mulch, as well as some shade.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Fragaria

 

LARGE-SCALE AQUAPINI PURCHASING DETAILS

The following is a list of the retail purchasing price of all the plants that will be planted in the Large-scale Aquapini. We are currently seeking companies that would like to partner with our 501(c)3 non-profit organization to bring these prices down and make duplication by the consumer easier. Visit our Win-Win-Win-Win page to understand our partnering philosophy and our Marketing and Promotional Engine Page for the specifics of how we can support those interested being a part of world change with One Community. These prices are rounded up to the nearest dollar and current as of September 2013.

NUMBER NAME PURCHASED FROM RECEIVED AS PRICE EA QTY TOTAL
#1A Mango Spirit of 76 pineislandnursery.com Grafted (3gal) $30 1 $30
#2A Avocado Queen pineislandnursery.com Grafted (3gal) $30 1 $30
#3A Starfruit B-12 pineislandnursery.com Grafted (3gal) $30 1 $30
#4A Cherimoya Selma, louiesnursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#5A Rainforest plum fruitlovers.com Seeds $8 1 $8
#6A White Sapote Youghans pineislandnursery.com Grafted (3gal) $35 1 $35
#7A Litchi pineislandnursery.com Air Layer (3gal) $35 1 $35
#8A Miracle fruit pineislandnursery.com Seedling (3gal) $35 5 $175
#9A Gotu Kola richters.com Plants $25 1 $25
#10A Rau Om richters.com Plants $32 1 $32
#11A Lemon Grass spykestropicalnursery.com Plant $5 1 $5
#12A Basil richters.com Plant $24 1 $25
#13A Gynura richters.com Plant $7 3 $21
#14A Sushni richters.com Plants (3) $15 3 $15
#15A Chaya neemtreefarms.com Plant $8 5 $40
#16A Iboza richters.com Plant $5 1 $5
#17A Citrus wncitrus.com Graft $25 7 $175
#18A Strawberry raintreenursery.com Plants (3) $26 3 $26
#19A Banana floridahillnursery.com Plant $8 3 $24
#20A Sauropus echonet.org Plant $10 5 $50
#21A Derris banana-tree.com Seeds $2 1 $2
#22A Houttuynia richters.com Plants (12) $32 1 $32
#23A Gingers caldwellhort.com Plant $10 5 $50
#24A Pipers floridahillnursery.com Plant $8 3 $24
#25A Jicama bountifulgardens.org Seeds $3 1 $3
#26A Chilcuague (sq.ft.) sacredsucculents.com Plant $23 2 $46
#27A Papaya alohaseed.com Seed (100) $17 1 $17
#28A Mints richters.com Plant $25 1 $25
#29A Neem spykestropicalnursery.com Plant $17 1 $17
#30A Moringa echonet.org Seeds $15 1 $15
#31A Sweet Potato sandhillpreservation.com Slips $14 5 $70
#32A Yam sacredsucculents.com Seeds $3 5 $15
#33A Luo Han Guo seedvendor.com Seeds $5 1 $5
#34A Chile seedsavers.org Seeds $25 1 $25
#35A Chufa tfchufa.com Seed Tubers $70 1 $70
#36A Pineapple spykestropicalnursery.com Plant $10 12 $120
#37A Kang-Kong greenharvest.com.au Seeds $4 1 $4
#38A Water chestnut massspectrumbotanicals.com Tubers $1 12 $12
#39A Panque capitawholesalenursery.com Plant $35 1 $35
#40A Foxnut bananas.org Seeds $10 1 $10
#41A Blue Lotus waterfordgardens.com Plant $40 3 $120
#42A Losus Root waterfordgardens.com Plant $40 3 $120
#43A Water Caltrop gekko-enterprise.com Seeds $5 3 $15
#44A-45A FMP Cilantro (2 rafts) seedsavers.org Seeds $30 1 $30
#46A-47A FMP Basil (2 rafts) seedsavers.org Seeds $30 1 $30
#48A-51A FMP Cabbage (4 rafts) seedsavers.org Seeds $30 1 $30
#53A-56A FMP Broccoli (5 rafts) seedsavers.org Seeds $30 1 $30
#57A-61A FMP Cauliflower (5 rafts) seedsavers.org Seeds $30 1 $30
#62A-67A FMP Kale (6 rafts) seedsavers.org Seeds $30 1 $30
#68A-73A FMP Lettuce (6 rafts) seedsavers.org Seeds $30 1 $30
#74A-79A FMP Celery (6 rafts) seedsavers.org Seeds $30 1 $30
#80A-81A FMP Watercress (2 rafts) seedsavers.org Seeds $30 1 $30
#82A-85A FMP Chard (4 rafts) seedsavers.org Seeds $30 1 $30
#86A-95A Alpine Strawberry – side plantings raintreenursery.com Plants $5 50 $250
 TOTAL $2223
 PLUS 20%* $445
 GRAND TOTAL $2668

20% is built in for taxes, shipping, and any other unexpected charges or fees.

WALIPINI 1

TOTAL GROWING AREA FOR THESE STRUCTURES: 1,827 sq ft/169.73 sq m
yeheb nut, walipini, growing apples in a walipini, One Community Food, sustainable food, highest good food, food sustainability, sub-tropical food greenhouse, greenhouse in the ground, open source food, sustainable eating, organic food, yearround food, year round food, growing food for yourself, how to grow food, walipini greenhouse, walipini for trees, open source walipini, walipini design, walipini creation, walipini planting plan, One Community food, Highest Good food

Walipini 1 Planting Map – Click to Enlarge

OVERVIEW

HARVEST    ●    FLOOR PLANTINGS    ●    SLOPE PLANTINGS    ●    COST

Walipini #1 will be the 4th house we build and will demonstrate a frost-free arid zone. The temperature range will be maintained between 60-100 F/16-38 C with humidity ranging between 50-90%. The plantings in Walipini #1 will be based on species from the world’s tropical deserts including (and centered around) specimens of the endangered species Cordeauxia edulis, the yeheb nut. Of the 26 species designated for Walipini #1, five are classified as endangered (like the yeheb nut) and nine are classified as vulnerable.

The south edge of the floor planting starts with a row of trees in the Burseraceae species of Commiphora, Bursera and Boswellia that have very sparse branching habit and minimal foliage to allow maximum light into the north end of this house. The two carob trees (#7 and #8) are at the west edge of the floor, close together so they can pollinate (the species is functionally dioecious). Moving east across the north wall are the two Cyrtocarpa’s (#14 & #15), placed next to each other for cross-pollination. The argan tree (#16) is located where it will receive maximum light from the east and south and the other species are tucked in to fill available spaces. The slope plantings place perennial species on the upper tier (using permacultural zoning) and farthest from the paths since they need less tending. Also, in the case of # 21 and #24, they are spiny and this additionally keeps them away from constant contact with people.

5-YEAR FOOD PRODUCTION PROJECTION AVERAGES

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE COMPLETE SPREADSHEET

FOOD YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR 4 YEAR 5
TOTAL 400 lbs 410 lbs 495 lbs 554 lbs 588 lbs

 

 COMPLETE INDIVIDUAL PLANT DETAILS

NOTE: Latin names are used first because they are universally accepted, with common names following in parenthesis. The index or reference number preceding each plant name is cross referenced to the planting cost analysis price list (coming soon) as well as the planting layout map above. The planting plan is not a firm declaration and may need to be modified as we continue to source plant material and/or on site (with ongoing updates here) after all plants are preliminarily sited. Every tree is listed but, due to the quantities of plants, not every individual plant is listed on the planting layout map.

 

FLOOR PLANTINGS

#1W1-#3W1 :: Cordeauxia edulis (Yeheb Nut)

Cordeauxia edulis, Yeheb Nut,aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

The yeheb nut is a shrub or small tree in the legume family, native to the Horn of Africa, and endangered. It grows 8-15 feet high by 12-15 feet wide. The plants produce yellow five-petal flowers followed by a woody beaked pod containing 1-4 seeds. The foliage is a high-protein browse for livestock, and produces a red dye. The seeds of Cordeauxia edulis contain 13% protein, 24% sugar, 11% fats and 37% starch.

PLACEMENTS

We will place this specimen of yeheb in the southwest corner of the floor in Walipini #1.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Flowers occur just before the rainy season in autumn
  • Mature plants can produce 5-8 kg of seeds per season
  • Plants produce a deep taproot, and should be planted out quickly
  • Seeds lose viability quickly and must be sown as soon as received
  • Fertilized flowers can stay dormant until there is rain, and then ripen
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Cordeauxia edulis as seed. Yeheb seeds should be planted immediately into deep tree pots to accommodate the deep tap root. Once the plant is 12-18 inches tall, it can be transplanted into its permanent location, taking care not to damage the taproot.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Cordeauxia edulis

 

#4W1-#6W1 :: Geoffroea decorticans (Chanar)

Geoffroea decorticans, Chanar, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Chanar is an upright tree to 20 feet with a spreading crown in the Leguminosae. It is native to southern South America, particularly Argentina and Chile. The tree produces abundant yellow flowers which are mildly fragrant. These are followed by a spherical pod containing sweet fleshy pulp which is unusual for a legume. The fruit pulp, produced after 5 or 6 years, is eaten fresh or made into arrope, a kind of molasses.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow this specimen of chanar between the westernmost and middle yeheb bushes, where its upright habit will form an overstory to them.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees are propagated from seed or root sprouts
  • Trees can sucker and in moist climates can form thickets
  • Trees are slow growing and can take several years to bear
  • Trees are adaptable to many soil types as long as they drain well
  • Seeds are edible after cooking to destroy traces of trypsin inhibitor
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Chanar as a small tree. The trees can be planted immediately into their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Geoffroea decorticans

 

#7W1 & #8W1 :: Ceratonia siliqua (Carob)

Ceratonia siliqua, Carob, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Carob is an evergreen tree in the Leguminosae native to the Mediterranean region and the Middle East. It can grow to 45 feet but is generally smaller, and takes pruning well. The trees produce mahogany-brown seed pods that are rich in sugars and protein, eaten since earliest times. The trees are nominally dioecious, but hermaphroditic clones are known. The seeds yield a gum used as a thickener.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow this specimen of carob at the southwestern corner of the floor plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Carobs tolerate poor soils and drought
  • Mature trees can bear up to 400 kg of pods
  • Trees will withstand only a few degrees of frost
  • Carob trees fix nitrogen and require little to no fertilizer
  • Extra care and irrigation in the first few years hastens bearing
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive carob as a small grafted tree. Trees should be planted immediately in their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Ceratonia siliqua

 

#9W1 :: Boswellia sacra (Frankincense)

Boswellia sacra, Frankincense, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Boswellia sacra is a drought-deciduous tree in the Burseraceae native to north eastern Africa. It is adapted to store moisture in its tissues, making it an extremely drought tolerant tree. It is famous as the source of the fragrant gum known as frankincense, used since ancient times. The gum is collected by wounding the trees bark, which can lead to the tree’s decline. The tree is considered endangered.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the Boswellia sacra just south of the easternmost chanar tree, at the base of the south slope plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees require excellent drainage
  • Trees should be fertilized only lightly (if at all)
  • Trees can be propagated from fresh ripe seeds or from cuttings
  • When temperatures fall below 55F trees should not be watered
  • Boswellia trees are native to a region where rainfall occurs in the summer
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Boswellia sacra as a rooted cutting. The rooted cutting should be up potted to a 5 gal. size and allowed to develop a full root system. It can then be transplanted into it’s permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Boswellia sacra

 

#10W1 :: Boswellia frereana (Maydi)

Boswellia frereana, Maydi, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Boswellia frereana is a drought-deciduous tree in the Burseraceae native to northeastern Africa. It is adapted to store moisture in its tissues, making it an extremely drought tolerant tree. It is one of the sources of the fragrant gum known as frankincense, used since ancient times. The gum is collected by wounding the trees bark, which can lead to the tree’s decline. The tree is considered endangered.

PLACEMENTS

We will plant the maydi tree just south of the westernmost chanar tree at the base of the south Slope Planting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees require excellent drainage
  • Trees should be fertilized only lightly (if at all)
  • Trees can be propagated from fresh ripe seeds or from cuttings
  • When temperatures fall below 55F trees should not be watered
  • Boswellia trees are native to a region where rainfall occurs in the summer
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive maydi tree as a rooted cutting. The rooted cutting should be up potted to a 5 gal. size and allowed to develop a full root system. It can then be transplanted into it’s permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Boswellia frereana

 

#11W1 :: Commiphora myrrha (Myrrh)

Commiphora myrrha, Myrrh, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Commiphora myrrha is a drought-deciduous tree in the Burseraceae native to northeastern Africa. It is adapted to store moisture in its tissues, making it an extremely drought tolerant tree. It is one of the sources of the fragrant gum known as myrrh, used since ancient times. The gum is collected by wounding the trees bark, which can lead to the tree’s decline. The tree is considered endangered.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Commiphora myrrha directly south of the middle chanar tree, at the south edge of the floor area.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees require excellent drainage
  • Trees should be fertilized only lightly (if at all)
  • Trees can be propagated from fresh ripe seeds or from cuttings
  • When temperatures fall below 55F trees should not be watered
  • Commiphora trees are native to a region where rainfall occurs in the summer
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Commiphora myrrha as a rooted cutting. The rooted cutting should be up potted to a 5 gal. size and allowed to develop a full root system. It can then be transplanted into it’s permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Commiphora myrrha

 

#12W1 :: Commiphora wightii (Guggul)
Commiphora wightii, Guggul, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Commiphora wightii is a drought-deciduous tree in the Burseraceae native from northern Africa to India. It is adapted to store moisture in its tissues, making it an extremely drought tolerant tree. It is one of the sources of the fragrant gum known as guggul, used since ancient times. The gum is collected by wounding the trees bark, which can lead to the tree’s decline. The tree is considered endangered.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Commiphora wightii directly south of the middle chanar tree, at the south edge of the floor area.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees require excellent drainage
  • Trees should be fertilized only lightly (if at all)
  • Trees can be propagated from fresh ripe seeds or from cuttings
  • When temperatures fall below 55F trees should not be watered
  • Commiphora trees are native to a region where rainfall occurs in the summer
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Commiphora wightii as a rooted cutting. The rooted cutting should be up potted to a 5 gal. size and allowed to develop a full root system. It can then be transplanted into it’s permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Commiphora wightii

 

#13W1 :: Bursera hindsiana (Copal)

Bursera hindsiana, Copal, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Bursera hindsiana is a drought-deciduous tree in the Burseraceae native to Mexico. It is sarcocaulescent, storing moisture in its trunk and branches to survive drought. It is one of the Bursera species from which a fragrant gum is collected called copal, and used as incense. The plant is also used medicinally and as a disinfectant. These uses parallel the uses of the related Old World genera Commiphora and Boswellia.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the Bursera tree in the southeast corner of the floor area.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees require excellent drainage
  • Trees should be fertilized only lightly (if at all)
  • Trees can be propagated from fresh ripe seeds or from cuttings
  • When temperatures fall below 55F trees should not be watered
  • Bursera trees are native to a region where rainfall occurs in the summer
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Bursera hindsiana as a rooted cutting. The rooted cutting should be up potted to a 5 gal. size and allowed to develop a full root system. It can then be transplanted into it’s permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Bursera hindsiana

 

#14W1 & #15W1 :: Cyrtocarpa edulis (Ciruela)

Cyrtocarpa edulis, Ciruela, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Circuela is a small drought deciduous tree in the Anacardiaceae native to southern Baja California. The tree is 10-15 feet in height with a low branching habit and compound leaves at the ends of of the branches. The flowers are small and white to green and are followed by a yellow to red 1-2” sweet-tart edible fruit. The seed is also edible and is said to taste like coconut. They have been gathered by native tribes for centuries.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow this ciruela against the north wall to the east of the carob tree.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Ciruela appears to respond well to extra irrigation
  • The plant forms a caudex at ground level for moisture storage
  • Graft compatibility with other Anacardiaceae will be investigated
  • No selection work has been done, improved clones should be identified
  • Plants grow in infertile rocky soils but growth could be improved with fertilizer
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Cyrtocarpa edulis as a small tree. The plant forms deep taproot, and seedlings should be up potted regularly until they a full root system in a 5 gal pot, then planted in their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Cyrtocarpa

 

#16W1 :: Argania spinosa (Argan)

Argania spinosa, Argan, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Argania spinosa is a slow growing evergreen in the Sapotaceae native to northwestern Africa. Argan trees can eventually reach 30 feet tall and can live for 200 years. The flowers are small, yellow-green with five petals, and are followed by 1.5” X 1” fruits. The nut in this fruit has 1-4 kernels, which are the source of argan oil. The argan forests in Morocco have been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the argan tree against the north wall.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Argan seedling benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Rapid improvement by selection is possible for argan
  • Argan seeds should be pre-soaked in sterile water 4 days
  • Argan seeds should be planted within a month after harvest
  • Argan nuts weigh between 0.5g to 8.6 g depending on clone
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Argania spinosa as seed. Seedlings should be grown in deep pots until a full root system forms, then transplanted to their permanent location. Mycorrhizal inoculation is beneficial.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Argan

 

#17W1 :: Olneya tesota (Iron Wood)

Olneya tesota, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Olneya tesota is a monotypic drought-deciduous tree in the Leguminosae native to the Sonoran Desert. Iron Wood has blue-green compound pinnate leaves, and flowers that range from pale pink to purple. These are followed by 2-4” pods containing 1-4 edible seeds. The dense hard wood is in great demand for carving and turnery, causing overharvesting. Olneya is an important browse and nurse tree for many desert species.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Olneya in the northeast corner of the Floor Planting area.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants form deep sinker roots to find moisture
  • Trees are long lived; specimens 200 years of age are known
  • Trees grow slowly; growth can be increased with extra irrigation
  • Olneya roots fix nitrogen and the tree requires little to no fertilizer
  • Seeds must be cooked as they contain traces of canavalin, a mild toxin
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Olneya tesota as a small tree. Seedling trees should be up potted to a 5 gal. size and allowed to develop a full root system; they can then be planted into their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Olneya

 

#18W1 :: Salvadora persica (Peelu)

Salvadora persica, Peelu, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Peelu is a shrub or small tree growing to 25 feet in the Salvadoraceae native from western India to Iran. The plant is highly adapted to desert conditions and can grow on a wide range of soils including saline soils. The twigs are used as chew sticks to clean the teeth and have been found very effective. The small red berries are sweet and edible, and young leaves are eaten in salads. Trees are cut for forage, and coppice well.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow peelu against the north wall between the easternmost ciruela and the argan tree.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants can root sucker and form thickets
  • Plants can stand extreme drought but no frost
  • Plants respond well to mulch and extra irrigation
  • Peelu has been recommended in reclamation of saline soils
  • Fruit flesh has germination inhibitors and must be removed before sowing
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive peelu as seed. Peelu seeds generally germinate one month after sowing. The seedlings should be potted up through larger size pots until they have reached a five gallon size, and then transplanted to their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Salvadora persica

 

#19W1 :: Phyllanthus emblica (Amla)

Phyllanthus emblica, Amla,  aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Amla is a shrub or small tree in the Euphorbiacae native to India. The plant ranges from 6-30 feet in height but can be pruned to size. Flowers and fruits are borne at the axils of the compound leaves. The 1 inch fruits are sour and astringent, containing high levels of vitamin C, and are an important medicinal food in Ayurveda. Phyllanthus species have been shown to have anti-viral effects in human tests.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the amla against the north wall next to the argan tree.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants benefit from partial shade when young
  • Selected clones can be propagated by grafting
  • Trees are deep rooted and require good drainage
  • Trees respond well to fertilizer and extra irrigation
  • The amla is drought hardy and is injured or killed by frost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive amla as seeds. Seeds germinate readily when fresh. They should be grown on until they have a full root system in a 5 gal pot and then transplanted to their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Phyllanthus emblica

 

#20W1 :: Cereus peruvianus (Apple Cactus)

Cereus peruvianus, Apple Cactus, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

The apple cactus is an upright columnar member of the Cactaceae native to Andean South America. It is widely grown around the world as an ornamental xeriscaping plant. It produces a plum-sized red, orange to yellow thornless fruit with crunchy white flesh and small black seeds. There is great variability in the quality of fruit from different clones. The stems of some clones are thornless.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the apple cactus near the southeast corner of the floor plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plants do not require fertilizer
  • Plants should not be watered during cold weather
  • For best growth, irrigate sparingly during hot weather
  • Reduce irrigation after fruit size up to avoid fruit splitting
  • Clone selection can rapidly improve crop characteristics
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive apple cactus as a rooted cutting. The rooted cutting can be planted directly into it’s permanent location. Water only sparingly until the plant shows signs of growth.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Local Harvest – Cereus peruvianus

 

#21W1 :: Neowerdermannia vorwerkii (Potato Cactus)

Neowerdermannia vorwerkii, Potato Cactus, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

The potato cactus is a low hemispherical cactus native to the altiplano of Bolivia and Argentina at 10 -13,000’. The plant is 4 inches in diameter and has dark green tubercles and lilac flowers. The cactus is collected, cooked and eaten after peeling, and is said to be rich in vitamin K calcium and zinc. Wild populations cannot sustain this harvest and cultivation is needed to conserve this species.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow a bed of potato cactus at the east end of the upper tier of Slope Planting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Cactus generally need little to no fertilizer
  • Cactus seeds need warmth and bright light to germinate
  • Initially we may graft the seedlings to force faster growth
  • Cactus need to be allowed to dry out during the winter cold
  • The species hardiness is not determined but should be tried outside
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive potato cactus as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to a 2” pot size, and can then be planted in their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Dave’s Garden – Neowerdermannia vorwerkii

 

#22W1 :: Corryocactus brevistylus (Sanky)

Corryocactus brevistylus, Sanky, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Sanky is an upright columnar cactus native the high inter Andean valleys of Peru and northern Chile at 8400-10,800 feet. The stems bear yellow flowers followed by softball sized green fruit. The fruit are as acid as a lemon, and are used to make a refreshing drink. The plant is said to be more cold and drought hardy than the lemon, and has been considered for domestication. The fruit are also eaten by guanacos (camelids).

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the sanky at the west end of the Floor Planting just south of the north carob tree.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Cactus generally need little to no fertilizer
  • The spines on sanky fruits are shed when the fruit ripen
  • Cactus seeds need warmth and bright light to germinate
  • Initially we may graft the seedlings to force faster growth
  • Cactus need to be allowed to dry out during the winter cold
  • The species hardiness is not determined but should be tried outside
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive sanky as seed or small rooted cutting. Seedlings should be grown on to a 5 gal. pot size, and can then be planted in their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Corryocactus brevistylus

 

 SOUTH AND WEST SLOPE PLANTINGS

#23W1 :: Tylosema esculentum (Marama)

Tylosema esculentum, Marama, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

The marama is a prostrate woody subshrub in the Leguminosae native to the dry regions of southern Africa. The woody branches are up to 10 feet long and arise from a large underground tuber that can weigh 20 pounds. Both the seeds and the tubers are eaten, and the tubers are also an emergency water source for desert travelers. Seeds have a protein content of 39%. Young tubers can be over 90% water.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow marama in the middle of the upper tier of the slope plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • No pests or diseases are noted
  • Seeds are not eaten raw as they have a slimy texture
  • Marama  seeds have a hard seed coat and need scarification
  • Plants grow vigorously during summer and are dormant in winter
  • If harvested for eating tubers should be  2-3 lbs., larger tubers fibrous
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive marama as seed. Due to the rapid tuber formation, marama seedlings should be quickly moved from germination flat and placed in large 5 gal pots for the first growing season. When plants go dormant the first winter, the plants (tubers) can be planted in their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Tylosema esculentum

 

#24W1 :: Acanthosicyos horridus (Nara Melon)

Acanthosicyos horridus, Nara Melon, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

The nara melon is a sprawling thorny dioecious perennial in the Cucurbitaceae native to arid regions of South Africa. The plants leaves are reduced to scales; photosynthesis is performed in the stems and thorns. The plants have greenish yellow flowers followed by green spiney fruit 6-8 inches in diameter. Both the flesh and seeds are eaten. Seeds, called butterpips, are up to 57% oil and high in protein.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow nara melons on the top tier of the west wall of slope plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant has medicinal uses
  • Responses to irrigation are unknown
  • Responses to fertilizers are unknown
  • The plants extremely deep taproots can reach 120 feet deep
  • Seeds have a short viability and should be planted when received
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Acanthosicyos horridus as seed. Nara melon seed has a short viability so it should be planted immediately upon receipt. The plants produce deep taproots so they should be sown in deep pots until germination. Once the second or third pair of true leaves forms, seedlings should be transplanted to their permanent location, taking care not to damage the taproot.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Acanthosicyos horridus

 

#25W1 :: Cucumis melo (Melons)

Cucumis melo (Melons),  aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Melons are a group of annual vining plants in the Cucurbitaceae native to the eastern Mediterranean and western Asia. Cucumis melo is divided into a number of botanical varieties. These include muskmelons (var. reticulatus), cantaloupes (var. catalupensis), and winter melons (var. inodorus). Within each group there are many cultivars. Melons have been cultivated for thousands of years.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow melons on the middle tier of the slope plantings, and also, along with tomatoes, use them as filler plants in any light gaps on the Floor Plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Flowers are primarily bee pollinated
  • Melons respond well to fertilizer and mulch
  • Some types exhibit some drought adaptations
  • Melons like rich loose soil and regular moisture
  • Melons are subject to some insect and fungal pests
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Cucumis melo as seeds. Seeds should be sown in flats and kept warm and moist until germination. Dibble into 4” pot until a good root system develops, then transplant where they are to grow and water in well.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Cucumis melo

 

# 26W1 :: Solanum lycopersicum (Tomato)

Solanum lycopersicum, Tomato, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

The tomato is a herbaceous short-lived perennial or annual in the Solanaceae native to Latin America. They bear small yellow flowers that are self pollinating, although insects can increase fruit set. The fleshy fruits range in size from a pea to an apple, and can be red, orange, yellow, white or purple. Thousands of cultivars are known. Fruits are high in vitamins, carotenoids, and other nutrients.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow tomatoes on the lower tier of the Planting Slope, and also, together with melons, as filler plants in any light gaps on the Floor Plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Tomatoes like a rich loose soil
  • Plants are subject to fungal and insect pests
  • Tomatoes like steady moisture and good drainage
  • Plants are heavy feeders, give frequent light applications
  • Plants need a long warm growing season for best production
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Solanum lycopersicum as seeds. Seeds should be sown in flats and kept warm and moist until germination, then dibbled into 4” pots. When plants have developed a full root system, they can be transplanted to their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Tomato

 

WALIPINI #1 PURCHASING DETAILS

The following is a list of the retail purchasing price of all the plants that will be planted in Walipini #1. We are currently seeking companies that would like to partner with our 501(c)3 non-profit organization as specific providers of these plants to make duplication by the consumer easier. Visit our Win-Win-Win-Win page to understand our partnering philosophy and our Marketing and Promotional Engine Page for the specifics of how we can support those interested being a part of world change with One Community. These prices are rounded up to the nearest dollar and current as of September 2013.

NUMBER NAME PURCHASED FROM RECEIVED AS PRICE EA QTY TOTAL
#1W1-#3W1 Yeheb Personal Connection Seed 0 3 $50
#4W1-#6W1 Chanar cals.arizona.edu/desertlegumeprogram Seed Index Seminum 3 $30
#7W1-#8W1 Carob papayatreenursery.com Graft $35 2 $70
#9W1 Frankincense miniatree.com Plant Ebay auction 1 $50
#10W1 Maydi miniatree.com Plant Ebay auction 1 $50
#11W1 Myrrh miniatree.com Plant Ebay auction 1 $50
#12W1 Guggul miniatree.com Plant Ebay auction 1 $50
#13W1 Copal miniatree.com Plant Ebay auction 1 $50
#14W1-#15W1 Ciruela desertmuseum.org Plant Index Seminum 2 $100
#16W1 Argan rarepalmseeds.com Seed $12 1 $12
#17W1 Iron Wood cals.arizona.edu/desertlegumeprogram Seed Index Seminum 1 $10
#18W1 Peelu seedcollector.com Seed $5 1 $5
#19W1 Amla horizonherbs.com Seed $4 1 $4
#20W1 Apple Cactus localharvest.org Cuttings $18 1 $18
#21W1 Potato Cactus sacredsucculents.com Seed $4 3 $12
#22W1 Sanky sacredsucculents.com Seed $4 1 $4
#23W1 Marama echocommunity.org Seed $40 1 $40
#24W1 Nara Melon rarepalmseeds.com Seed $30 1 $30
#25W1 Melon seedsavers.org Seed $20 1 $20
#26W1 Tomato seedsavers.org Seed $20 1 $20
 TOTAL $675
 PLUS 20%* $135
 GRAND TOTAL $810

20% is built in for taxes, shipping, and any other unexpected charges or fees.

WALIPINI 2

TOTAL GROWING AREA FOR THESE STRUCTURES: 1,827 sq ft/169.73 sq m
walipini, growing apples in a walipini, One Community Food, sustainable food, highest good food, food sustainability, sub-tropical food greenhouse, greenhouse in the ground, open source food, sustainable eating, organic food, yearround food, year round food, growing food for yourself, how to grow food, walipini greenhouse, walipini for trees, open source walipini, walipini design, walipini creation, walipini planting plan, One Community food, Highest Good food

Walipini 2 Planting Map – Click to Enlarge

OVERVIEW

HARVEST    ●    APPLES    ●    FIGS    ●    POMEGRANATE    ●    GUAVA    ●    OS    ●    GC    ●    COST

Walipini #2 will be the third house we build and will function as the borderline subtropical house. It will maintain cool subtropical and temperate off-season production of plants that will enjoy its temperature and humidity ranges of 32-90 degrees F (0-32C) and 30-50% respectively. In support of the growing needs of the plants in this house, we will control the internal temperatures in this house to allow the ideal of 400 hours of winter chill. In other words, for 400 hours during the winter months the internal temperature will be allowed to go below 45F (7.2C), but will be kept above 37F (2.8C) at night. Following nights of accumulating winter chill hours, the daytime temperatures will not be allowed to exceed 55F (12.8C). This is because very warm temperatures immediately following chill temperatures can cancel out the beneficial chill effect. We will also use (for the apple espaliers) the technique of forcing bloom by defoliation, as is routinely done with apple crops in tropical climates. By defoliating a few trees successively week by week, we can harvest ripe apples throughout the year to supplement stored fruit from our outside orchards and food-forests.

To assure the subtropical crops in Walipini #2 are not adversely affected by this strategy, the internal temperature at no time will reach frost-damaging temperatures of 32F (0C) or less. Additionally, just to be safe, the species chosen (feijoa, loquat, and guava) can survive brief bouts of frost if we were willing to allow for the reduction in fruit production that this may cause.

With all the species chosen and 142 fruit trees in one house, the main concern is not too much cold, but rather insufficient light. To account for this, we have incorporated a design that maximizes the light that reaches the evergreen subtropicals along the north wall, by placing only winter deciduous species to the south of them. The largest of these, the apricots, will be pruned to a very open scaffold of branches, in order to allow maximum light through their canopy even when leafed out. As the system develops, we will closely monitor the light-fall through the structure and, if it is deemed necessary, we will add grow lights under the north half of the roof as needed.

walipini, growing apples in a walipini, One Community Food, sustainable food, highest good food, food sustainability, sub-tropical food greenhouse, greenhouse in the ground, open source food, sustainable eating, organic food, yearround food, year round food, growing food for yourself, how to grow food, walipini greenhouse, walipini for trees, open source walipini, walipini design, walipini creation, walipini planting plan, One Community food, Highest Good food

Walipini 2 Planting Cross-section – Click to Enlarge

5-YEAR FOOD PRODUCTION PROJECTION AVERAGES

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE COMPLETE SPREADSHEET

FOOD YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR 4 YEAR 5
FRUIT 285 lbs 395 lbs 1,024 lbs 1,794 lbs 2,483 lbs

 

 COMPLETE INDIVIDUAL PLANT DETAILS

NOTE: Latin names are used first because they are universally accepted; common names following in parenthesis. The index or reference number preceding each plant name is cross referenced to the planting cost analysis price list (coming soon) as well as the planting layout map above. The planting plan is not a firm declaration and may require modification as we continue to source plant material and/or on site (with ongoing updates here) after all plants are preliminarily sited. Every tree is listed but, due to the quantities of plants, not every individual plant is listed on the planting layout map.

 

 APPLES

#1W2-#50W2 :: Malus X domestica (Apples)

apples, apple diversity, Highest Good food, sustainable foodIn accordance with our botanical garden model, One Community will grow some of the most diverse, endangered, and delicious apples in the world. Many of these trees used to be hugely popular but are now virtually unheard of. To conserve space while maximizing production and providing the diversity we seek, the apple trees we grow will be on dwarfing rootstock as wire-trained espaliers or fans (depicted at left).

Each of the specific apples we will grow has been carefully selected for its unique flavor characteristics, specific notable uses (drying, baking, cider, storage, etc.), and to maintain a diverse production season. This will provide anyone duplicating this food production house fresh and delicious apples with a broad range of different flavors and uses throughout the year.

PLACEMENT

So we can demonstrate the massive diversity of what is available, we will grow three parallel rows of apples (50 different varieties total) on dwarfing rootstock as wire-trained espaliers (or fans) north of the apricot row, along the south and east edge of the floor planting, and at the base of the slope plantings. All of these espaliers will be trained 4 feet wide and 4 feet high except the triple row on the floor. Those will be 4 feet wide and six feet high. We will receive these apples as small grafted trees.

THE APPLES WE WILL GROW

We will purchase all of our apple trees from our partners at Century Farm Orchards. The reason for this is because most of the apples we will grow are so rare that Century Farm Orchards is one of only two places in the world to purchase them. The number of each apple tree correlates with the location number on the map and we have included descriptions for the first 11 apple varieties to illustrate the diversity we will produce. Links to the Century Farm Orchards website are included for the rest of the remaining descriptions (where possible).

 

1. Ashmead Kernal apple

Ashmead Kernal apple, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The Ashmead Kernal apple is one of the most unusual of all apples because it is completely covered with a thick russet. The flavor, however, is shockingly sweet and acidic and has been described as “fireworks for the palate.” You’ll never find this apple in the grocery store though because of its appearance and the fact that the apples tend to be erratic in size and on the small side. It ripens late September into October.

 

2. Opalescent apple

Opalescent apple, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The Opalescent apple is a popular large New England apple. The flesh is light yellow-green, very dense, and its size make it hard to carve out the first few bites. It is sweet, crunchy, juicy, a well-flavored apple described as having “faint lilac and other floral notes and something that is almost like pineapple and sugar.” It ripens to an iridescent glowing crimson on the tree and is good for eating raw, baking, storing, and making cider too.

 

3. Summer Banana apple

Summer Banana, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The Summer Banana is from Marion County, South Carolina and was first grown in the late 1800’s. It is so named because it can have a slight banana aroma when fully ripe. Fruit is usually medium in size, a deep yellow with small light green splotches and perhaps a few red dots at its peak of ripeness. It is a fine-grained flesh apple and one of the best of all apples for frying. Fruit ripens in August and September.

 

4. Keener Seedling apple

Keener Seedling, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The Keener Seedling is a heavily russeted apple with a slight red blush that originated in Lincoln County, NC around 1880. It is a medium-sized apple, sweet, firm, and also very disease resistant. It is unique in that it ripens extremely late and can hang on the tree until late November. It has a white and juicy flesh and is good for fresh eating, cooking, canning, jellies, and storing well into the spring.

 

5. Black Oxford apple

Black Oxford, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The Black Oxford apple is a deep purple (almost black) apple that is excellent for eating, cooking, and making cider. The apple is slightly ribbed and classically shaped, round to conical. Its unbroken peel has a faint grassy smell. The flesh of Black Oxford is dense and light yellow, firm, and with flavors that are mild and sweet followed by a prominent grassy aftertaste from the peel, which is chewy.

 

6. Green Newtown Pippin apple

Green Newtown Pippin, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Also called Albemarle Pippin or Yellow Newtown Pippin, this apple was planted by both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson at their respective estates. Green Newtown Pippin fruit is large, skin yellow with a pink blush, and the flesh is yellow, firm, crisp, juicy, and subacid. Fruit ripens in October, and it stores quite well, often improving in flavor upon storage. This apple tree needs a loamy, friable soil to produce a high quality crop.

 

7. Bevin’s Favorite apple

Bevan’s Favorite, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

First described in 1859, Bevan’s Favorite is prized for its early ripening period, good flavor, and beauty. The tree is vigorous and productive. The fruit’s size is medium, its skin yellow with many red stripes and possibly a red blush on the side facing the sun. The flesh is juicy, crisp, and fine-grained. The apples ripen in early to mid July. This apple is not a good storage apple.

 

8. Yellow June apple

yellow june apple, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Yellow June ripens in late June and early July, making it one of the first apples of the summer season to ripen. It is tart, bruises easily, and does not keep well. The fruit is medium in size, a bright yellow upon full ripening (green otherwise), and the flesh is white, tender, and briskly subacid. It is considered great for cooking and frying, having the consistency of a sauce.

 

9. Burford’s Red Flesh apple

Burford’s Red Flesh apple, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Burford’s Red Flesh has beautiful red flesh inside and crimson skin covered with light russeting. One of the venerable Tom Burford’s discoveries, this tree produces fall foliage that is a glowing and awe-inspiring orange-red. The apples are medium-sized, crisp, juicy, tart, and sweeten in storage. These apples are especially great for ciders and making lovely red/pink sauces and chutneys.

 

10. Royal Limbertwig apple

Royal Limbertwig, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The Royal Limbertwig is a high quality apple that grows well in warm clients. Fruit is medium to large, its skin yellow with some red, and its flesh fine grained, juicy, tender, and mildly subacid. It has a rich flavor, keeps well, and is good for fresh eating, cooking, and keeping. Fruit ripens in October and the apple gets its name from the drooping nature of the tree’s limbs.

 

11. Horse apple

Horse apple, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

More than any other apple, most older southerners remember the Horse apple. The tree is healthy, grows rapidly, and produces large crops of big apples late July into August. Flesh is yellow, soft (sometimes firm), uniquely tart, and will disappoint those who like sweet or hard apples. Fruit size is medium to large, yellow when ripe, possibly red on the sunny side. This apple makes great cider and cooks well too.

 

ADDITIONAL VARIETIES

We will also grow the following additional varieties (numbers correlate with the map):  12. Sweet Potato apple 13. Stuart’s Golden apple 14. Razor Russet apple 15. Sugar Ball apple 16. Baltimore Pound apple 17. Florina apple 18. Dr. Matthews apple 19. Cannon Pearmain apple 20. Carolina Red June apple 21. Hopple’s Antique Gold apple 22. Carter’s Blue apple 23. Pumpkin Sweet apple 24. Coe’s Golden Drop apple 25. Mushmellon Sweet apple 26. Aunt Rachel apple 27. Hudson Golden Gem apple 28. Liveland Raspberry apple 29. Smoky Mtn. Limbertwig apple 30. Yellow Newtown Pippin apple 31. Roxbury Russet apple 32. Ralls Janet apple 33. American Golden Russet apple 34. Fall Flat Cheese apple 35. Esopus Spitzenburg apple 36. Johnson Keeper apple 37. Early Strawberry apple 38. Kinnaird’s Choice apple 39. Magnum Bonum apple 40. Terry Winter apple 41. Lowland Raspberry apple 42. Father Abraham apple 43. American Beauty apple 44. Leather Coat apple 45. Swiss Limbertwig apple 46. Red Limbertwig apple 47. Goldrush apple 48. Black Limbertwig apple 49. Red Royal Limbertwig apple 50. Pitmaston Pineapple apple

 

FIGS

#51W2-#94W2 :: Ficus carica (Fig)

Ficus carica, Fig, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,In accordance with our botanical garden model and our for The Highest Good of All biodiversity goals, One Community will also grow a broad diversity of rare and delicious figs. We are establishing the necessary relationships with the nursery capable of providing these delicious figs for anyone who will want to duplicate our efforts so that more and more people around the world begin to add fig diversity to their own gardens.

The common fig tree is a drought and cold deciduous shrub/small tree. The leaves are large and deeply lobed or serrated. The “fruit” is actually an inside-out flower called a synconium. The flesh can be translucent, white, pale yellow to red or purple, and the tiny edible seeds add to the overall eating experience.  Figs must ripen on the tree, and are eaten fresh when available. Surplus crops can also be dried for later use.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow 44 different figs as espaliers along the serpentine retaining walls of the Planting Slope. These espaliers will be trained to wire supports and will be 4 feet wide and 4 feet high.

THE FIGS WE WILL GROW

Here is the list of the different types of figs we will grow. Each of the figs listed below was carefully selected so that we can demonstrate and enjoy the benefits of the most diverse selection possible. The number of each fig tree correlates with the location number on the map.

51. Angelique fig

Angelique, fig, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Angelique was one of three fig varieties grown by Thomas Jefferson. It has skin that is golden with white specks, and flesh that is white with pink tinge. It is only sold by one English nursery, held in the Figs 4 Fun Foundation collection. It is said that it will not sweeten up in cooler climates. This fig appears to withstand humidity well, and should be good for growers in the South.

52. Atreano fig

Atreano, fig, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Atreano produces clusters of light green to golden figs, with a sweet pink to amber flesh. This fig is larger than Alma, but smaller than Conadria. The flavor is rated as excellent if they are allowed to fully ripen, to the point of wrinkling, on the tree. The tree is a reliable bearer, and production is considered good. It has been described by the Figs 4 Fun Foundation as “a must have”.

53. LSU Purple fig

LSU purple, fig, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Released in 1991, LSU Purple is a very reliable, prolific producer of early to late figs. It is excellent for containers, producing early figs as soon as growth starts. The medium-small figs are purple skinned with strawberry colored flesh, with a small eye making it resistant to spoilage and excellent flavor. They are very acclimated to the fluctuating weather of the South. The fruit ripen early; good for short season climates.

54. Panachee fig

Panachee fig, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Panachee is a variety that produces green fruit with white or yellow stripes and deep strawberry flesh. This variegation is unusual and makes the Panachee an easy fig to identify; it is sometimes called the “Tiger fig”.  It has rich gourmet, super sweet flavor, and is rated as one of the best if it receives enough heat. This fig needs a long growing season, and does not perform well in the humid South.

55. Violette de Bordeaux fig

Violette de Bordeaux, fig, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Violette de Bordeaux produces purplish black skinned fruits with strawberry colored flesh. These figs are small and of excellent flavor. They are not as hardy as some figs and may need protection in marginal areas. Some consider this variety the same as Negronne, others insist they are distinct. The figs have a closed eye making it good for humid summer climates.

56. Hardy Chicago fig

Hardy Chicago, fig, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Hardy Chicago produces small to medium fruit with light brown to violet skin, and strawberry pink pulp. It has a small eye and is pyriform with a long slender neck. This fig has excellent flavor and is very hardy. It was discovered in the 1970’s in Chicago by NAFEX member Fred Borne. The tree produces fruit on new growth, so even root sprouts from winter killed trees will bear fruit.

57. Jelly fig

Jelly fig, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The Jelly fig has yellow skin and amber colored flesh and is grown best in regions of consistent weather and temperatures. It is very juicy and nearly seedless. The Jelly fig is a modern variety developed in California; some consider this variety to be the same as Mary Lane. The reason why this fig is best grown in consistent weather conditions is because this fig is prone to splitting in extreme conditions.

58. Beall fig

Beall fig, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Beall is a medium to large, purplish black fruit, with a prominent neck and amber flesh. It has a very good flavor, described by Ken Love as “mild berry”. This fig was a chance seedling discovered by W.A Beall in Santa Clara CA in 1924. It performs well in both California and the humid South; praised by some growers in Louisiana. This fig can produce two crops a year in climates with a sufficiently long growing season.

59. Black Jack fig

Black Jack, fig, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good Black Jack, food, walipinis, organic food

Black Jack is an oblate, large to very large, purple-brown fig with a long neck and amber pulp streaked with strawberry. The fruit somewhat resembles Black Mission, but Black Jack tends to be a much smaller tree. It’s a fairly hardy and delicious fig with a good flavor for eating raw or making jams. The identity of this variety is sometimes confused with the California Brown Turkey cultivar.

60. Saint Anthony fig

Saint Anthony, fig, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good Black Jack, food, walipinis, organic food

Saint Anthony is a soft, yellow, flat, fig with an excellent flavor. It is tender, sweet, with a melon-like flavor combined with a touch of honey and ripens fruit for almost three months. The tree begins to fruit early making it a good variety for short-season growing areas. This variety is considered by some to be the same as Marseilles; some nurseries even call it St. Anthony Marseilles.

 

ADDITIONAL VARIETIES

61. Deanna  fig 62. Tennessee Mountain fig 63. Peter’s Honey fig 64. Dalmatian fig 65. Green Ischia fig 66. Italian Everbearing fig 67. Kadota fig 68. Tena fig 69. Excel fig 70. San Pedro fig 71. Black Mission fig 72. Sari Lop fig 73. Zidi fig 74. Adriatic fig 75. Blue Celeste fig 76. Croisic fig 77. Galbun fig 88. Osborne Prolific fig 79. Vista fig 80. Kalamata fig 81. Lattarula fig 82. King fig 83. Mary Lane fig 84. Magnolia fig 85. Negronne fig 86. Royal Vineyard fig 87. Verte fig 88. Texas Everbearing fig 89. Dauphine fig 90. Ariane fig 91. Conadria fig 92. Brown Turkey fig 93. Blanche fig 94. Armenian fig

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Fertilize figs lightly if at all
  • Fig trees benefit greatly from mulch
  • Figs are drought tolerant once established
  • Cuttings are the preferred propagation method
  • Figs are ripe when the “neck” softens and fruits droop
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive all fig trees as rooted cuttings. Plant the rooted cuttings directly where they are to stand, or pot them into 5 gal pots until convenient to plant in their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Figs

 

POMEGRANATE

#95W2-#104W2 :: Punica granatum (Pomegranate)

Punica granatum, Pomegranate, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,The pomegranate is a shrub or small tree in the Punicaceae native to the warmer regions of Western Asia. These trees have simple leaves and red orange flowers and provide fruit that are 4-6 inches in diameter with a leathery rind. There are soft seeded and hard-seeds varieties of pomegranates, the former being preferred for fresh eating, the latter for juicing. We will grow both.

The fruit of the pomegranate contains many small seeds, each encased in a juicy aril. In soft-seeded varieties, the aril and seeds are eaten together, and constitute the edible portion. In hard-seeded varieties, the arils are usually crushed for the sweet-tart juice and the seeds discarded. Seeds of both types yield a valuable oil, used for cosmetics. The rinds are used medicinally, and to tan leather.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow 10 pomegranates in two rows as understory plants to the north and south of the apricot row.

THE POMEGRANATE WE WILL GROW

Here is the list of the different types of pomegranate we will grow. These pomegranate varieties have been hand-selected to demonstrate and support biodiversity while providing pomegranate that are specialized for eating and/or juicing. The number of each pomegranate tree correlates with the location number on the map.

95. Parfianka pomegranate 96. Sirenevyi pomegranate 97. Sin Pepe pomegranate 98. Myatadzhy pomegranate 99. Molla Nepes pomegranate 100. Ariana pomegranate 101. Medovyi Vahsha pomegranate 102. Al Sirin Nar pomegranate 103. Myagkosemyannyi Rosovyi pomegranate 104. Gissarskii Rozovyi pomegranate

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Pomegranates benefit greatly from mulch
  • Pomegranates have few insect pests or diseases
  • Pomegranates stand considerable drought once established
  • Plants are perfect-flowered but cross pollination increases yields
  • Hardiness of pomegranates seems to vary depending with the clone
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these pomegranates as small rooted cuttings. Rooted cuttings can be planted immediately into their permanent location in Walipini #2 if the house is closed in.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Pomegranate

GUAVA

#105W2-#116W2 :: Psidium guajava (Guava)

Psidium guajava, Guava,  aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,The guava is a spreading shrub or small tree in the Myrtaceae native the the warm parts of Latin America growing up to 33 feet tall (growth in California is 10-12 feet tall). This exotic plant has entire leaves, somewhat coriaceous (which have medical uses) and bears white to pink flowers with exerted stamens. These are followed by a round to pyriform fruit containing many small seeds.

The fruits are very aromatic, typically 1 to 5” in diameter with yellow to pink skin. Guavas may have a musky odor and are sweet or tart, tasting somewhat like a combination of a pear and strawberry. They can be used in tropical drinks, smoothies, yogurts, ice creams, jellies, syrups, sauces, and many other products. The seeds can be eaten and/or juiced with the fruit. We will grow 12 different types of guava.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow 12 guavas in a row against the north wall.

THE GUAVA WE WILL GROW

Here is the list of the different types of guava we will grow. These guava varieties have been hand-selected to provide a diversity of guava for One Community residents and visitors to enjoy. The number of each guava tree below correlates with the location number on the map. 105. Ruby Supreme guava 106. Indian Red guava 107. Hong Kong Pink guava 108. Red Malaysian guava 109. Thai Maroon guava 110. Indonesian Seedless guava 111. Priceless guava 112. Detwiler guava 113. Ruby X guava 114. Turnbull White guava 115. Vietnamese guava 116. Giant Bangkok guava

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees are drought tolerant once established
  • Guavas respond well to organic fertilizers and mulch
  • Guavas branch at the base but can be pruned to tree form
  • Guavas will tolerate only mild frosts and can be killed at 25F
  • In suitable climates guavas can produce multiple crops per year
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive guava as rooted cuttings. Depending on the size received, the plants can either be planted in their permanent location immediately, or grown on to larger size prior to planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Guava

 

#117W2-#128W2 :: Acca sellowiana (Pineapple Guava, Feijoa, Guavasteen)

Acca sellowiana, Pineapple Guava, Feijoa, Guavasteen, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,The pineapple guava is a perennial evergreen shrub that grows to 10 feet. They are native to southern Brazil, Uruguay, Paraguay and northern Argentina. It has leathery grey-green leaves and flowers with white to pink petals and exerted red stamens. The fruit are 2-3” long by 1-1.5” in diameter with green skin and white or translucent flesh. We will grow 12 different varieties of pineapple guava and both the flowers and fruit are edible.

The fruit is green when ripe with a layer of white flesh surrounding the translucent aril. The flesh contains some grit cells similar to a pear and add texture to the jelly-like aril. The flavor is sweet, subacid with notes of pineapple, guava, apple, and pear. The flesh is spooned out of the leathery skin. Fruit have a short shelf life, and should be eaten within a few day of dropping or the flesh will brown and the flavor will deteriorate.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow a row of 12 pineapple guavas against the north wall row of guavas and tucked under the loquats.

THE PINEAPPLE GUAVA WE WILL GROW

Here is the list of the different types of pineapple guava we will grow. These pineapple guava varieties have been hand-selected to demonstrate and support biodiversity while providing a broad flavor spectrum for One Community’s residents and visitors. The number of each pineapple guava tree below correlates with the location number on the map above.

117. Edenvale Late pineapple guava 118. Edenvale Improved pineapple guava 119. Edenvale Supreme pineapple guava 120. Unique pineapple guava 121. Robert pineapple guava 122. Apollo pineapple guava 123. Nazemetz pineapple guava 124. Gemini pineapple guava 125. Trask pineapple guava 126. Coolidge pineapple guava 127. Triumph pineapple guava 128. Pineapple Gem pineapple guava

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees are drought tolerant once established
  • Pineapple guava respond well to organic fertilizers and mulch
  • In suitable climates guavas can produce multiple crops per year
  • Pineapple guava branch at the base but can be pruned to tree form
  • Pineapple guava will tolerate more frost than the true guava (as low as 10 F)
PLANTING GUIDELINES

Pineapple guava plants will be received as rooted cuttings. Depending on the size received, the plants can either be planted in their permanent location immediately, or grown on to larger size prior to planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Pineapple Guava

 

 OVERSTORY

#129W2-#136W2 :: Eriobotrya japonica (Loquat)

Eriobotrya japonica (Loquat), aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food, The loquat is a small evergreen tree to 20 feet or smaller in the Rosaceae native to Japan and China. The leaves are shiney, deep green, in whorls at the branch tips. The flowers are also borne in panicles at the ends of the branch tip, and have a fragrant, honey-like aroma. These are followed by the fruit in clusters, yellow to orange, oval, 1-2” long with one or more seeds. New growth is tomentose.

Loquats have a thin skin covering the orange juicy subacid flesh. Skin can be eaten with the flesh but for commercial processing skins are removed by blanching. Seeds are discarded, as they contain amygdalin, chemically related to cyanide. Fresh loquat undergo a subtle color change when ripe; if picked too soon, fruits are sour. Fruits are eaten fresh, canned or made into jelly.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow a row of 8 loquats along the north wall just to the south of the guava and feijoa rows where the increased roof height will better accommodate them. They will be pruned to allow more light into the feijoa understory.

THE LOQUATS WE WILL GROW

Here is the list of different types of loquats we will grow. These loquat varieties have been hand-selected to provide a diversity of loquat flavors. The number of each loquat tree correlates with the location number on the map.

129. McBeth loquat 130. Champagne loquat 131. Gold Nugget loquat 132. Vista White loquat 133. Early Red loquat 134. Wolfe loquat 135. Strawberry loquat 136. Big Jim loquat

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Flowers are bee pollinated
  • Trees bloom in fall, fruits ripen in 90 days
  • Trees are hardy to 12F, but fruit is damaged at 25F
  • In Taiwan trees are dwarfed to 3’ on quince rootstock
  • Spraying blooms with 60ppm gibberellic acid increases fruit set and quality
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive loquats as small grafted trees. Depending on the size received, the plants can either be planted in their permanent location immediately, or grown on to larger size prior to planting

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Loquat

 

#137W2-#142W2 :: Prunus armeniaca (Apricot)

Prunus armeniaca, Apricot, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,The apricot is a small to medium sized deciduous tree native to Central Asia. As a species of Prunus, it can hybridize with cherries, plums, peaches and nectarines, and act as a pollinator or receive pollen from some of them. Trees are generally 15 to 20 feet in height. They produce May through August starting with small white flowers followed by 2-3” diameter fruits that contains a single seed.

Relatives to peaches, apricots are small fruit, golden orange in color, with velvety skin and flesh, not too juicy but definitely smooth and sweet. Some describe their flavor as almost musky, with a faint tartness that lies somewhere between a peach and a plum. They have a high beta-carotene, vitamin C, fiber content. Apricots are enjoyed as a fresh fruit but also dried, cooked into pastry, and eaten as jam.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow a row of 6 apricots down the center of Walipini #2 to take advantage of the roof height there.

THE APRICOTS WE WILL GROW

Here is the list of 6 different types of apricots we will grow. The number of each apricot tree correlates with the location number on the map. 1. Blenheim apricot 2. Monique apricot 3. Lorna apricot 4. Moorpark apricot 5. Redsweet apricot 6. Sparks Mammoth apricot

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees prefer neutral to slightly alkaline soils
  • Apricots are quite drought hardy when established
  • Apricots are subject to several bacterial and fungal diseases
  • Established trees can take -22F but are susceptible to late spring frosts
  • Some varieties are self fertile, but will bear heavier with cross pollination
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive apricots as small grafted trees. They can be planted immediately where they are to stand and should be watered in well and mulched.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Apricot

 

 GROUNDCOVER PLANTINGS

#143W2 :: Cucumis melo (Melon)

Cucumis melo, Melons, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Melons are a group of annual vining plants in the Cucurbitaceae native to the eastern Mediterranean and western Asia.  Cucumis melo is divided into a number of botanical varieties. These include the muskmelons (var. reticulatus) the cantaloupes (var. catalupensis) and winter melons (var. inodorus). Within each group there are many cultivars. Melons have been cultivated for thousands of years.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow melons on the middle tier of the slope plantings, and also, along with tomatoes, use them as filler plants in any light gaps on the Floor Plantings.

THE MELONS WE WILL GROW

Muskmelon, cantaloupe, and winter melon varieties have been chosen to provide a range of ripening times, a wide diversity of flavors and textures for salads, cooking and fresh eating, and with an eye towards germplasm conservation in keeping with our botanical garden model.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Flowers are primarily bee pollinated
  • Melons respond well to fertilizer and mulch
  • Some types exhibit some drought adaptations
  • Melons like rich loose soil and regular moisture
  • Melons are subject to some insect and fungal pests
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive melons as seeds. Seeds should be sown in flats and kept warm and moist until germination. Dibble into 4” pot until a good root system develops, then transplant where they are to grow and water in well.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Cucumis melo

 

#144W2 :: Fragaria sp. (Strawberry)

Fragaria sp., Strawberry, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Fragaria hybrids are cosmopolitan herbaceous perennials in the Rose family. The modern strawberry arose early in the 20th Century as a chance cross. The fruits are very nutritious, and the leaves are used for a medicinal tea reputed to be beneficial for pregnant and nursing women. Modern day-neutral varieties are nearly everbearing in frost free climates. Fruits are eaten fresh or frozen, and made into jam.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow strawberries in the middle tier of the slope plantings towards the western end, and also grow runnerless alpine strawberries along the base of the tree row along the north wall.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Strawberries need high fertility, but excess nitrogen reduces fruit set
  • Plants are best fed with compost and well-decomposed poultry manure
  • They can continue to bear fruit through fall and winter if they do not freeze
  • Plants can show boron deficiencies in some soils, seaweed sprays can treat this
  • Day-neutral cultivars have been bred so they do not enter dormancy after the equinox
PLANTING GUIDELINES

Strawberries are usually received as small plantlets or crowns, and should be planted where they are to grow immediately. If this is not possible they can be heeled in to moist sawdust or sphagnum and held for 1-3 weeks but may suffer setback when finally planted out. Plants should be placed 8-12 inches apart in a rich well worked soil, watered in well and mulched.

Alpine strawberries are treated somewhat differently, since they do not produce runners. They are planted much closer together; individual plants will enlarge from the root crowns over time, but tolerate crowding well. They also benefit greatly from mulch, as well as some shade.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Fragaria

 

WALIPINI 2 PURCHASING DETAILS

The following is a list of the retail purchasing price of all the plants that will be planted in Walipini #2. We are currently seeking companies that would like to partner with our 501(c)3 non-profit organization as specific providers of these plants to make duplication by the consumer easier. Visit our Win-Win-Win-Win page to understand our partnering philosophy and our Marketing and Promotional Engine Page for the specifics of how we can support those interested being a part of world change with One Community. These prices are rounded up to the nearest dollar and current as of September 2013.

 

NUMBER Name PURCHASED FROM RECEIVED AS PRICE EA QTY TOTAL
#1W2-#50W2 Apple www.centuryfarmorchards.com Graft $18 50 $900
#51W2-#94W2 Fig figs4fun.com Rooted $15 44 $660
#95W2-104W2 Pomegranate greenseafarm.com Rooted $30 10 $300
#105W2 Guava Ruby Supreme papayatreenursery.com Rooted $30 1 $30
#106W2 Guava Indian Red papayatreenursery.com Rooted $30 1 $30
#107W2 Guava Hong Kong Pink frankiesnursery.com Rooted $30 1 $30
#108W2 Guava Red Maylaysia flowerdalenursery.com Rooted $30 1 $30
#109W2 Guava Thai Maroon tropicalfruittrees.com Rooted $30 1 $30
#110W2 Guava Indonesian Seedless papayatreenursery.com Rooted $30 1 $30
#111W2 Guava Detwiler figs4fun.com Rooted $30 1 $30
#112W2 Guava Ruby X tropicalfruittrees.com Rooted $30 1 $30
#113W2 Guava Turnbull White papayatreenursery.com Rooted $30 1 $30
#114W2 Guava Vietnamese papayatreenursery.com Rooted $30 1 $30
#115W2 Guava Giant Bangkok tropicalfruittrees.com Rooted $30 1 $30
#116W2 Guava Early Red papayatreenursery.com Rooted $30 1 $30
#117W2 Feijoa Edenvale Late arboreum.biz Graft $30 1 $30
#118W2 Feijoa Edenvale Improved arboreum.biz Graft $30 1 $30
#119W2 Feijoa Edenvale Supreme arboreum.biz Graft $30 1 $30
#120W2 Feijoa Robert onegreenworld.com Graft $30 1 $30
#121W2 Feijoa Coolidge onegreenworld.com Graft $30 1 $30
#122W2 Feijoa Unique capitolwholesalenursery.com Graft $30 1 $30
#123W2 Feijoa Pineapple Gem arboreum.biz Graft $30 1 $30
#124W2 Feijoa Apollo onegreenworld.com Graft $30 1 $30
#125W2 Feijoa Nazemetz fig4fun.com Graft $30 1 $30
#126W2 Feijoa Gemini arboreum.biz Graft $30 1 $30
#127W2 Feijoa Trask figs4fun.com Graft $30 1 $30
  TOTAL $2550
  PLUS 20%* $510
  GRAND TOTAL $3060

20% is built in for taxes, shipping, and any other unexpected charges or fees.

WALIPINI 3

TOTAL GROWING AREA FOR THIS STRUCTURE: 2,987 sq ft/277.5 sq m
walipini, aquapini, food diversity, preserving bio diversity, eco-food

Walipini 3 Planting Map – Click to Enlarge

OVERVIEW

HARVEST    ●    OVERSTORY    ●    MIDDLESTORY    ●    SLOPE    ●    NORTH WALL    ●    COST

Walipini #3 will have a mix of perennial and annual crops. It will be maintained at a constant minimum temperature of 60 degrees Fahrenheit (15.6C) and a humidity level of 60% or greater. The focus is to maximize the efficient utilization of every possible cubic foot of space, lumen of light, and BTU of heat for food production. To achieve this we will plant a series of overstory trees from east to west across the floor in a slight arc to maximize sunlight capture. This overstory row will be positioned so that the crowns of the trees lie just under and to the north of the highest point of the roof peak. Interspersed with these will be a series of middle story trees, pruned to take advantage of the overstory. Below that is the understory, and under that will be perennial ground covers and scattered emergent herbaceous perennials and annuals. This design will maximize available space and light, creating maximum “edge effect” in keeping with proper permacultural design principles.

5-YEAR FOOD PRODUCTION PROJECTION AVERAGES

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE COMPLETE SPREADSHEET

FOOD YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR 4 YEAR 5
Fruit 383 lbs 3,014 lbs 4,480 lbs 5,421 lbs 6,570 lbs
Veg 222 lbs 281 lbs 293 lbs 293 lbs 293 lbs
Other 1,383 lbs 1,533 lbs 1,658 lbs 1,658 lbs 1,658 lbs
TOTAL 1,988 lbs 4,828 lbs 6,431 lbs 7,372 lbs 8,521 lbs

 

 COMPLETE INDIVIDUAL PLANT DETAILS

NOTE: Latin names are used first because they are universally accepted, with common names following in parenthesis. The index or reference number preceding each plant name is cross referenced to the planting cost analysis price list (coming soon) as well as the planting layout map above. The planting plan is not a firm declaration and will be modified on site (with ongoing updates here) after all plants are preliminarily sited. Due to the quantities of plants, for ease of clarity and understanding, not every individual plant is listed on the planting layout map.

OVERSTORY TREES

#1W3 :: Artocarpus altilis (Breadfruit)

Artocarpus altilis, Breadfruit, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,The breadfruit tree is in the Moraceae and is native to S.E. Asia and the Pacific Islands. The trees can grow to 60 feet but are kept smaller by pruning, which aids in harvesting the fruits. The tree is tropical in its requirements and does not grow in climates where the temperatures stay below 60F for extended periods. Trees are extremely productive and some varieties produce fruit throughout the year.

The fruit is round to oblong, averaging from 2 to 7 pounds. The pebbly green to yellow skin is peeled, revealing the smooth starchy flesh. It is eaten raw (in some varieties), boiled, fried, roasted, mashed, or fermented. There are seedless and seeded varieties, the latter called breadnut; like chestnuts, these seeds are also eaten after cooking. Dry-fleshed and moist-fleshed varieties are prepared differently.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow breadfruit in the east end of the overstory arc, in the warmest and sunniest spot in the house, next to the jackfruit, with an eye towards hybridizing them.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees prefer regular light applications of fertilizer
  • Unharvested ripe fruits will fall, and can be messy
  • Trees are propagated by root cutting or tissue culture
  • Trees will defoliate if drought stressed, but can recover
  • The trees require constant humidity and warm temperatures
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive breadfruit as a root cutting or tissue culture. More details coming soon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Breadfruit

 

#2W3 :: Artocarpus heterophyllus (Jackfruit)

Artocarpus heterophyllus, Jackfruit, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,Jackfruit is closely related to breadfruit, and is native to the Western Ghats in India. The trees are somewhat more tolerant of cooler temperatures than the breadfruit, and withstand considerably more drought. The fruits are the largest known; individual fruits are recorded in excess of 100 pounds, although much smaller fruits are more common. Trees can reach 40 feet, but are kept smaller by pruning.

The abundant fruits are used in a variety of ways. Unripe fruits are used as a vegetable, and have a very meat-like texture; they are used in Indian vegetarian dishes. In ripe fruits the fleshy arils around each seed are eaten, and taste like banana/apricot/mango. The seeds are parboiled and roasted, and taste like chestnuts. They are a good source of carbohydrates, protein, and vitamins, particularly B1 and B12.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow jackfruit in the overstory row near the breadfruit, with an eye towards cross pollinating them.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Jackfruit is quite drought tolerant once established
  • The thick leathery leaves make a good mulch for the tree
  • All parts of the tree produce a sticky latex that makes a waterproof glue
  • The tree should be pruned to form strong lateral branches to carry the most fruit
  • The tree makes a deep taproot and should thrive on the moisture level in the walipini
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive jackfruit as a small grafted tree. More details coming soon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Jackfruit

 

#3W3 :: Pouteria sapota (Mamey)

 Pouteria sapota, Mamey, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe mamey is a large tree in the Sapotaceae native to Central America and Mexico. The trees can reach 40 feet in height but can be kept smaller by pruning. The tree yields a hard reddish-brown timber. Mature trees can be very productive, bearing large crops of 1 to 3 pound fruits. Seedling trees can take 7-10 years to begin bearing, but grafted trees can begin to bear in 3-5 years.

The fruits of the mamey have a scurfy brown skin enclosing a moist salmon colored flesh containing one or two shiny brown seeds. The flesh has the consistency of a ripe avocado, and a mild sweet potato or pumpkin pie flavor. They are eaten fresh and made into milkshakes, ice cream, or baked into empanadas and other desserts. The fruits are very nutritious, having high levels of vitamins and minerals.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow mamey in the overstory row to take advantage of the walipini height.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Fruit skin does not change color when ripe
  • The mamey tree is tolerant of limestone soils
  • They like warmth and abundant rainfall and are frost sensitive
  • Fruit are allowed to soften off the tree before eating like avocado
  • Fruit flesh will change from green to red when fruit is ready to pick
  • Mamey trees should be tip pruned, forming strong lateral branches
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive mameys as small grafted trees. More details coming soon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Pouteria sapota

 

#4W3 :: Mangifera casturi (Casturi)

Mangifera casturi, Casturi, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe casturi is a relative of the mango that was native to the island of Kalimantan in Indonesia. Due to intensive logging on that island, the species is now considered extinct in the wild. It is still grown in a few village gardens, and trees exist in Hawaii and Florida. This tree can be grafted onto mango rootstock and is more resistant to fungal diseases, and can grow in climates unsuitable for mango production.

The fruit of casturi has a resemblance to mango, but a different flavor, “mango crossed with sugarcane.” The fruit is somewhat smaller and more round than the mango and noted for its fragrance; there are folk songs written extolling the fruits heavenly aroma. Fruit flesh is a deeper orange than mango, and is probably richer in carotenoids. A face cream made from the fruit is said to slow the signs of ageing.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow casturi trees in the overstory row, taking advantage of the walipini height.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS

The casturi should be preserved as a delicious fruit in its own right

Fruits will set during wet humid weather, a trait missing in the mango

The casturi also needs to be preserved as a potential genetic resource

The tree is slow to come into bearing; grafting should reduce the juvenile period

Seedlings should be selfed and hybridized for maximum expression of casturi traits

PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive the casturi as a small grafted tree. More details coming soon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Mangifera casturi

 

#5W3 :: Manilkara zapota (Sapodilla)

Manilkara zapota, Sapodilla, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe sapodilla is a tree in the Sapotaceae native to Mexico and Central America. The tree can reach heights of 80 feet, but can be kept small by pruning. The trees grow relatively slowly, and can reach great age. They produce a latex called chicle that was the base for chewing gum for many years. The trees yield a dense heavy tropical hardwood, and many old growth trees have been cut for their timber.

The fruit is round to oblong, 4-5 inches in length, with a light brown skin that feels rough to the touch. Inside, the flesh is tan to reddish brown with one to three dark brown seeds. The texture is like a pear with some degree of “grit” cells in most varieties. The flavor is very sweet, like ripe pears in honey. The fruit are picked when full sized but still hard, and allowed to ripen for a few days off the tree.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow sapodillas in the overstory row closer to the west end.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Fruit change color only slightly when ripe
  • Trees prefer a soil amended with organic matter
  • An established tree can produce very large crops
  • Trees prefer several light applications of fertilizer during the growing season
  • Sapodillas are adapted to a wet/dry tropical climate, and withstand some drought
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive sapodillas as small grafted trees. More details coming soon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Manilkara zapota

 

#6W3 :: Diospyros blancoi (Mabolo)

Diospyros blancoi, Mabolo, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe mabolo is an evergreen tree in the Ebenaceae native to the Philippine Islands. The tree can reach large sizes in the forest, but is smaller in cultivation. It yields a hard dense wood and has been logged extensively; it is now critically endangered. The tree is considered dioecious, but some varieties seem to be self-fertile; these are often seedless. Seedlings can take 10 years to bear; grafted trees bear in 3-5 years.

The fruit is the size of its close relative, the Japanese persimmon, with a velvety red orange skin. The flesh is white to pale yellow, with the texture of a mushy apple. The flavor is unique; pungent, rich, and sweet but with some unusual notes of aged cheese. It is well liked by many, but there are those who find its taste too strong or different. It is eaten fresh, made into baked desserts, and makes a memorable ice cream.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow mabolos in the overstory row near the west end, next to the black sapote, with an eye towards cross pollination.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Mature trees can produce large crops
  • Trees grow slowly at first then accelerate after roots establish
  • Trees are mainly produced by air layers, but grafting is possible
  • Trees produced by air layer are shallow rooted and require windbreaks
  • Since the tree is nominally dioecious, a self-fertile clone must be obtained
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive mabolos as small grafted trees. More details coming soon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Diospyros blancoi

 

#7W3 :: Diospyros digyna (Black Sapote)

Diospyros digyna, Black Sapote, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe black sapote is an evergreen tree in the Ebenaceae native to Mexico and Central America. The tree can reach a height of 60 feet but can be kept smaller by pruning. It has been cultivated since pre-Columbian times for the sweet fruits. The tree yields a dense hardwood, yellow with dark streaks. The bark and leaves of the tree have been used as medicine to treat fever and skin ailments.

The fruit is the size of its close relative, the Japanese persimmon, with a smooth green skin. The flesh is a chocolate brown color, with a smooth creamy texture. The flavor is delicate, mildly sweet, and greatly appreciated by most people who taste it. They have become very popular in Australia, where many varieties have been developed. It is frequently blended with whipped cream to make a mousse.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow black sapotes at the east end of the overstory row, next to the mabolos, with an eye towards cross pollination.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • We will attempt to hybridize black sapote and mabolo
  • Fruit remain green when ripe, but fruit will become soft
  • Trees are deep rooted and can withstand some drought
  • The black sapote bears abundant crops when well-grown
  • We will attempt to graft back sapote onto American persimmon
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive black sapotes as small grafted trees. More details coming soon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Diospyros digyna

 

#8W3 :: Myrciaria cauliflora (Jaboticaba)

Myrciaria cauliflora, Jaboticaba, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe jaboticaba is an intensely branched tree in the Myrtaceae native to South America, especially Brazil. The fruits are borne directly on the trunk and larger branches, a flowering habit known as cauliflory. This gives this tree its species name; however there are many other species that are also called jaboticaba. Many are cultivated in Brazil where it is a very popular fruit. The trees  can reach 40 feet after many years.

The jaboticaba is similar in appearance to a grape, and is used in similar ways – juice, wine, and fresh. The skin contains tannins; some people find the taste too strong and discard them. The flesh is sweet, subacid, and refreshing and usually contains one to three small seeds. The skin, flesh, and seeds of the fruit all contain high levels of antioxidants. The tree can bear several crops per year under optimal conditions.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the jaboticabas in the overstory row near the east end where it will get full day sun.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Mulching is very beneficial as a slow source of nutrients
  • Trees like abundant water, but can stand considerable drought
  • Mature trees can cover themselves with fruit down to the ground
  • Trees prefer acid soils; if chlorotic give chelated iron and potassium nitrate
  • Trees flower and set fruit in flushes, and can carry multiple crops simultaneously
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive jaboticabas as small grafted trees. More details coming soon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Jabuticaba

 

MIDDLESTORY TREES

 

#9W3-#11W3 :: Persea americana (Avocado)

Persea americana, Avocado, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Persea americana is a tree in the Lauraceae native to Central America, producing fruits that lack sweetness, but are high in protein and oil. Avocado trees withstand a few degrees of frost if not for prolonged periods, and require regular watering with excellent drainage. They are very productive, and the ripe fruit can remain on the tree. Trees of the Mexican landrace have leaves with an anise-like scent, and are used as a spice.

The fruit vary enormously, weighing from 5 ounces to over 3 pounds, and skin color of green, red, purple or black. The flesh is yellow to green with a smooth creamy texture and a rich buttery flavor. Flavor is somewhat related to oil content, with higher oil content used as a quality indicator. In the flesh is a single seed, which sometimes sprouts while still in the fruit. The fruits have good levels of protein and vitamins.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow avocados in the middle story from the east to the center of the row, in order to have both A & B flower types to maximize pollination and extend the bearing season.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees like regular watering but cannot tolerate waterlogged soil
  • There are three races of avocado; Mexican, Guatemalan & West Indian
  • The Mexican landrace of avocado is the most cold hardy of the avocados
  • The Guatemalan race is intermediate and is thought to be hybrids of the other two
  • Avocados are a small to medium sized tree and can be pruned to a height of 10 feet
  • Trees will suffer with more than a few degrees of frost, and will lose leaves and twigs
  • Extended drought will cause leaf drop; growth resumes with water, bark may sunburn
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive avocados as small grafted trees. More details coming soon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Avocado

 

#12W3 :: Pouteria caimito (Abiu, Yellow Star Apple)

Pouteria caimito, Abiu, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodThe abiu is a small tree in the Sapotaceae native to the rainforests of South America. The trees are usually 15 to 25 feet tall but can be kept smaller by pruning. The tree bears a fruit the size of an orange, with a smooth yellow leathery skin. The translucent flesh contains from one to four dark brown seeds. Trees can flower and set fruit at any time of the year depending on the climatic conditions.

The fruit of the abiu has a sweet juicy flesh that has the flavor of caramel. They are eaten fresh, or made into ice cream and desserts. The skin of the fruit can have a gummy latex that sticks to the lips, especially if the fruit is not fully ripe. For that reason the flesh is best scooped out of the skin with a spoon. Fruits can keep up to two weeks after picking, possibly due to the antibacterial triterpenes found in the flesh.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow abius as middle story trees in the overstory row. More details coming soon.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Mature trees have produced up to 1000 fruit
  • Grafted trees have borne fruit in their second year
  • Abiu trees prefer full sun but will tolerate some shade
  • The flesh contains a series of antibacterial triterpenes
  • The fruit is eaten in the Amazon as a remedy for sore throats
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive abius as small grafted trees.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Pouteria caimito

 

#13W3-#19W3 :: Annona sp. (Soursop, Prickly Custard Apple)

Annona sp., aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodAnnona species are a group of small trees mainly native to Latin America. They are 15 to 25 feet in height, but can be pruned to any size. They are evergreen to partly deciduous trees that prefer warm moist conditions. Most species are at least partially self-fertile, but they will benefit by adequate cross-pollination. They have few pests and diseases, and may require treatment with zinc and micronutrients.

Fruits of Annona species vary in size from a few ounces to several pounds. They are round to heart-shaped, and can be green, yellow, or red at maturity. The skin has a wide range of forms from smooth to tuberculate, nippled, or spinescent. The flesh ranges in texture from a creamy and custard-like consistency to fibrous and gritty. The flavors can blend pineapple and banana notes with a unique spiciness.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow several annonas as middle story trees in the overstory row, with an eye towards cross pollination and possible hybridization.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees should be pruned to form wide lateral branches
  • In very wet soils, A. glabra should be used as rootstock
  • Graft compatibility is still being worked out for many species
  • Bearing is influenced by adequate nutrition, especially micronutrients
  • Leaves contain insecticidal compounds and may be useful companion plants
  • Water regularly as trees will drop leaves and fruit if they are drought stressed
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive annonas as small grafted trees. More details coming soon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Annona

 

#20W3-#31W3 :: Eugenia sp. (Pitanga, Uvaiha, Sundrop)

Eugenia sp., aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodEugenia is a genus of small trees and shrubs in the Myrtaceae, native to Africa, Australia, and the Americas. The trees tend to branch low and are easily shaped to any size. Most species require warm conditions but many can take a few degrees of frost. Some have specific requirements of soil type, drainage, or pH. Many new species are being discovered, particularly in Latin America.

The fruits of Eugenia range in color from white, yellow, orange, red, to purple and blue. They range in size from a cherry to that of a small orange. The flavors are reminiscent of cherry, apricot, mango, even roses, and range from tart to sweet. Perhaps no other genus produces fruits so diverse as Eugenia. There are over 1000 species known, with more being discovered; most of these are not known in cultivation.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Eugenias as a middle story plant in the central overstory row.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Eugenia species can bear early and heavily
  • Eugenia fruit usually contain high nutrient levels
  • Some Eugenias do not bear until their bark begins to peel
  • Eugenias are not heavy feeders but respond well to mulch
  • Some Eugenia species respond well to micronutrient application
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Eugenias as small trees or as seed. More details coming soon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Eugenia

#32W3-#42W3 :: Citrus sp. (Oranges, Lemons, Limes, Kumquat, etc.)

Citrus-sp-aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Citrus is a genus of 30 accepted species in the Rutaceae, native to warm regions in Asia. The taxonomy is challenging, as Citrus hybridized freely; many plants formerly considered species have been shown to be hybrid by isozyme analysis. They are evergreen or briefly deciduous shrubs and trees to 30 feet, bearing aromatic fleshy acid to subacid fruits that are green, yellow, and orange to red.

Citrus fruits range in size from 1” (kumquat) to 10” (grapefruit) in diameter. The flesh is composed of vesicles within distinct segments. The skin contains oil glands and is very aromatic. The flavors vary and range from tart to sweet subacid. Due to the high content of vitamin C, bioflavonoids, carotenoids and terpenes, they are highly nutritious and have medicinal properties.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Citrus to the south and north of the overstory row.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Citrus is most efficiently fed through foliar spraying
  • Citrus trees require attention to pH and micronutrients
  • Most citrus fruit can hang on the tree for many weeks after maturity
  • They can become chlorotic on alkaline soils and like iron supplements
  • The trees are subtropical and can withstand some light frost and drought
  • Citrus has an extensive system of feeder roots, and benefits greatly from mulch
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as small grafted trees. The trees should be grown on to a 5 gal. size before planting in its permanent location

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Citrus

 

#43W3 :: Sauropus androgynus (Katuk)

Sauropus, Sweet Leaf, Katuk, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Sauropus is an upright small shrub from southeast Asia in the Euphorbiaceae. They are found naturally in the rainforest understory, and can withstand deep shade. The tender new tip growth and leaves are eaten raw or steamed and taste like snow peas. Sweet leaf is high in protein, vitamins, and minerals. The flower is 4-petaled reddish-brown, and borne in the leaf axils, followed by a white fruit.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Sauropus at the west end of the lower tier of the slope plantings, near the entrance, to facilitate regular harvesting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plants will grow in neutral to acid soils
  • Since the branches grow vertically, Katuk can be densely planted
  • Tender growing tips are stimulated by heavy feeding and watering
  • Partial to deep shade is best, as the growing tips get fibrous in full sun
  • The plants require steady moisture and will tolerate temporary flooding
  • Sauropus are easily propagated from cuttings, which will root directly in the ground

 

PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Sauropus as rooted cuttings. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Sauropus

 

SLOPE PLANTINGS

#44W3 :: Ananas sp. (Pineapple)

Ananas, Pineapple, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The pineapple is a terrestrial bromeliad native to South America. The plant produces an aggregate fruit surrounding a central stem. The fruit contains an enzyme, bromelain, that aids digestion. The leaves are used to make a very fine fiber that was an important export of the Philippines (nylon rope is now used in its place). Plants are propagated from vegetative offsets of cultivated varieties or from tissue culture.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow pineapples in the west end of the middle tier of the slope plantings, where they will cast minimal shade.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are generally pest free
  • Pineapples will grow in any soil
  • Pineapples grow in partial shade to full sun
  • When plants reach full size they can be induced to fruit with ethylene
  • Plants withstand dry periods but for best fruit production require regular watering
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted offsets or tissue cultures. The rooted offsets can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Tissue cultures should be removed from the flask, their roots carefully washed free of media, potted in a light mix in 6” pots and watered in well. When plants have developed a full root system they can be planted where they are to stand.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Ananas

 

#45W3 :: Dioscorea sp. (Yams)

Dioscorea,Yams, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Yams are vining perennial plants in the Dioscoreaceae that are native throughout the warm temperate and tropical regions worldwide. They produce abundant edible tubers at the end of the growing season and are a staple of many cultures. They can be fried, grilled, baked, boiled, barbecued, smoked, and roasted. Tubers can reach enormous size if not harvested for food or used for the production of steroidal saponins.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow yams on the west end of the upper tier of the slope plantings, so that their low growth habit will not shade other parts of the walipini.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The tuberous roots can be harvested at any time
  • In humid climates the vines can become rampant
  • Yams need warm temperatures and will not withstand frost
  • Some species require extensive preparation to remove saponins
  • The aerial bulbils of many species can also be cooked and eaten
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seed or small tubers. Seed should be planted in a nursery tray and kept warm and moist until germination. Seedlings should be dibbled into individual 4” pots until a good root system forms, then planted where they are to stand. Small tubers can be planted immediately where they are to grow.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Yams

 

#46W3 :: Capsicum sp. (Chile Peppers)

Capsicum, Chile Peppers, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Capsicum belongs to the Solanaceae and are related to tomatoes, eggplants, and tobacco. They are native to the American tropics and have been cultivated for thousands of years. All Capsicums contain a compound, capsaicin, which is responsible for the spicy effect. The fruits are highly nutritious and rich in vitamin C and carotenoids. They are tender perennials usually grown as annuals.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow chile peppers in the lower tier of the slope plantings to facilitate regular harvesting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants prefer a fertile well amended soil
  • Plants are self fertile but bees will increase yields
  • Peppers are subject to fungal diseases in some areas
  • Plants like adequate moisture and are frost intolerant
  • The spiciness of peppers is measured in Scoville units
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seed. Seeds should be sown in a nursery flat and kept warm and moist until germination, and then dibbled into individual 2-4” pots until a good root system forms. They can then be transplanted where they are to stand. Depending on the variety, they should be spaced from 10 to 24” apart.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Chili Peppers

 

#47W3 :: Cucurbitaceae (Melons, Cucumbers, Squash etc.)

Cucurbitaceae, Melons, Cucumbers, Squash, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The Cucurbitaceae is a family of herbaceous to woody annuals and perennials distributed in the warm temperate to tropical regions worldwide. There are approximately 960 species distributed among 125 genera. A number of species produce edible fruits, seeds and leaves; others are known to produce medicinal compounds. Many species are narrowly endemic, and not well known outside their native range.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Cucurbitaceae on the middle tier of the slope plantings east of the pineapples.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Cucurbitaceae prefer a long warm growing season
  • Light feedings of compost during the growing season are beneficial
  • They prefer adequate moisture, although they are desert adapted species
  •  Cucurbitaceae tend to be heavy feeders, and do best in soils rich in organic matter
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seeds. They should be sown in a greenhouse or cold frame to ensure adequate warmth. Once the seedlings have reached the second pair of true leaves, they may be transplanted into a fertile frost free location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Cucurbitaceae

 

#48W3 :: Ipomea batatas (Sweet Potatoes)

Ipomea batatas, Sweet Potato, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Ipomea batatas are extremely productive vining plants in the Convolvulaceae, yielding more food per square foot than almost any other tropical vegetable. They are native to warm regions of the American tropics, but have become an important crop worldwide. Sweet potatoes require a long growing season to produce their abundant tubers underneath long vines. The vine tips are also eaten as a vegetable.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow sweet potatoes on the upper tier of the slope plantings, east of the yams.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plants are generally pest free
  • Vines will grow in any well-drained soil
  • If aluminum is present in the soil, lime must be added
  • Vines grow vigorously and eliminate weed competition
  • The vines are propagated from tuber roots called “slips”
  • In tropical climates the tubers can remain in the ground until needed
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted slips. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. In hot weather it may help to shade the slips for a few days after transplanting. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Sweet Potato

 

#49W3 :: Pachyrhizus sp. (Jicama)

Pachyrhizus, Jicama, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Jicama is a root vegetable in the legume family native to Mexico, where it has been cultivated for centuries. The plant is a twining vine that sprawls across the ground or climbs nearby plants. The vines make an effective living mulch. The edible tubers have a crisp, juicy texture and are eaten raw or cooked. They are good companion plants that fix nitrogen and have foliage that contains rotenone, a natural insecticide.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow jicama on the upper tier of the east side of the slope plantings, where its low growth habit will not cast any shade.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plants are generally pest and disease free
  • Tuber formation doesn’t begin until the equinox
  • Jicama requires a long frost-free growing season
  • Plants will grow in any soil but require good drainage
  • The seed pods and seeds are toxic and dangerous to eat
  • Tubers may be stored in the the ground but eventually become woody
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seed. Seeds should be planted in a nursery pot and kept warm and moist until germination. When the first pair of true leaves emerges, they should be dibbled into 1 gal. pots and grown on until a good root system develops. Then they can be planted in the location indicated on the planting plan, and watered in well.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Pachyrhizus

 

#50W3 :: Fragaria sp. (Strawberries)

Fragaria sp., Strawberry, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Fragaria hybrids are cosmopolitan herbaceous perennials in the Rose family. The modern strawberry arose early in the 20th Century as a chance cross. The fruits are very nutritious, and the leaves are used for a medicinal tea reputed to be beneficial for pregnant and nursing women. Modern day-neutral varieties are nearly everbearing in frost free climates. Fruits are eaten fresh or frozen, and made into jam.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow strawberries on the south central section of the floor planting, where they will get maximum sun.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Strawberries need high fertility, but excess nitrogen reduces fruit set
  • Plants are best fed with compost and well-decomposed poultry manure
  • They can continue to bear fruit through fall and winter if they do not freeze
  • Plants can show boron deficiencies in some soils, seaweed sprays can treat this
  • Day-neutral cultivars have been bred so they do not enter dormancy after the equinox
PLANTING GUIDELINES

Strawberries are usually received as small plantlets or crowns, and should be planted where they are to grow immediately. If this is not possible they can be heeled in to moist sawdust or sphagnum and held for 1-3 weeks but may suffer setback when finally planted out. Plants should be placed 8-12 inches apart in a rich well worked soil, watered in well and mulched.

Alpine strawberries are treated somewhat differently, since they do not produce runners. They are planted much closer together; individual plants will enlarge from the root crowns over time, but tolerate crowding well. They also benefit greatly from mulch, as well as some shade.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Fragaria

 

#51W3 :: Solanum sp. (Pepino Dulce, Naranjillo, Casana, etc.)

Solanum sp., Pepino Dulce, Naranjillo, Casana, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The genus Solanum reaches its greatest diversity in the warm regions of Latin America. Many species are utilized locally, but have been little known to the outside world. They produce fruits with a wide range of shapes, colors, textures, and flavors. They are herbaceous short-lived perennials and can likely be cultured like their close relatives, the tomato. Many of these are little known; minimal cultural data is available.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Solanum in the northeast corner of the understory plantings on the shade side of the overstory.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Solanums are prone to Manduca larva and whiteflies
  • Good soil fertility is important, feed lightly and frequently
  • Solanum species can be prone to nematode infestations
  • They will not tolerate wet soils, and require good drainage
  • Solanums require warmth, and constant moisture, they will wilt if drought stressed
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seeds or rooted cuttings. Seeds should be sown in a nursery flat and kept warm and moist until germination. After the second pair of true leaves emerges, dibble into individual 2” pots and grow on until 4-6” high. Transplant where they are to stand. Rooted cuttings can be transplanted immediately where they are to stand.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Solanum

 

#52W3 :: Moringa sp. (Malungay)

Moringa, malungay, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodMoringa, belonging to the Moringaceae family, is grown in the drier regions of Africa, Madagascar, and India. When raised for food they are usually grown as shrubs to aid in harvesting. The leaves, unripe pods, and flowers are all eaten and are high in protein and vitamins. The plants have soft succulent stems and branches, and can resist prolonged droughts.

The leaves are harvested and cooked at any stage. The green pods are harvested when they will still “snap” like green beans and cooked. Seeds from overmature pods can be used until they turn yellow and begin to harden. The pods are twisted open and the seeds removed and blanched to remove any bitterness. They can then be boiled, steamed, or stir fried in the same way as peas.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Moringa in the northwest corner of the understory plantings close to the entrance, to facilitate frequent harvesting. We are choosing a variety that has been developed for greater branching and heavier leaf production.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant needs to be kept above 32F
  • The plants are easily grown from seed or cuttings
  • The trees can stand much drought, but are frost sensitive
  • Seeds are best eaten in the half-ripe stage, and are cooked like peas
  • For leaf production the plant should be cut to stimulate more branching
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. The rooted cuttings can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Moringa

 

#53W3 :: Mentha pulegium (Pennyroyal)

Mentha pulegium, Pennyroyal, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Pennyroyal is a low growing herbaceous perennial in the mint family native to Europe. The plant spreads vigorously by underground rhizomes. It has been used as a flavoring for food by the Greeks and Romans, but is not consumed today due to the toxicity of the essential oil. The plant is still widely grown for its insect repellent properties. The essential oil contains the compound pulegone.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow pennyroyal as an understory planting just inside the entrance, where their volatile essential oils will help repel crawling insects.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Pennyroyal grows in sun to part shade
  • Plants are easily propagated by division or rooted cuttings
  • Due to it’s mat-forming roots, it tolerates foot traffic fairly well
  • The plants prefer regular water, and responds well to fertilizer
  • The plant should be monitored to insure it doesn’t become invasive
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive pennyroyal as rooted cuttings. Rooted cuttings can be transplanted immediately into their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Mentha pulegium

 

#54W3 :: Mentha X piperita (Peppermint)

Mentha X piperita, Peppermint, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Peppermint is a naturally occurring hybrid of spearmint and watermint originating in Europe. It is a low growing herbaceous perennial spreading vigorously by rhizomes. For centuries It has been used in as a flavoring, and for it’s many medicinal properties. The essential oil contains pulegone, which has been shown to be an effective insect repellant. The oil also has antibacterial and antifungal properties.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow peppermint as an understory planting just inside the entrance, where their volatile essential oils will help repel crawling insects.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Peppermint grows in sun to partial shade
  • Plants are easily propagated by division or rooted cuttings
  • Due to it’s mat-forming roots, it tolerates foot traffic fairly well
  • The plants prefer regular water, and responds well to fertilizer
  • The plant should be monitored to insure it doesn’t become invasive
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive peppermint as rooted cuttings. More details coming soon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Peppermint

 

#55W3-a :: Zingiber officinale (Ginger)

Zingiber officinale, Ginger, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Ginger is a tropical herbaceous briefly deciduous perennial in the Zingiberaceae native to Asia. The pseudostems arise from underground rhizomes, which are the part usually used. They have been grown for thousands of years for their hot aromatic flavor, used both as a culinary ingredient and medicinally. The rhizomes contain complex essential oils and oleoresins and the inner pseudostems are sometimes eaten.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow ginger as an understory planting beneath the west and east ends of the overstory, where it will benefit from the overstory shade.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Feed and water only when growth begins in spring
  • Gingers have few insect pests but several fungal diseases
  • They require warmth, shade, moisture, fertile soil and good drainage
  • Do not over fertilize, several light feedings are preferable to one heavy feeding
  • During the winter season the plants become dormant and must be allowed to dry out
PLANTING GUIDELINES

Ginger will be received as rhizomes, which should be be planted immediately in a light well draining mix in a pot just big enough to accommodate it. Water only sparingly until vegetative growth begins. At that point the plant can be planted in its permanent location. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin. When foliage dies down in autumn, cease feeding and allow the plants to dry out as they are dormant and do not require much water.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Ginger

 

#55W3-b :: Alpinia galanga (Greater Galanga)

Alpinia galanga, Greater Galanga, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Galanga is a tropical herbaceous briefly deciduous perennial in the Zingiberaceae native to Asia. The pseudostems arise from underground rhizomes, which are the part usually used. They have been grown for thousands of years for their hot aromatic flavor, used both as a culinary ingredient and medicinally. The rhizomes contain complex essential oils and oleoresins and the inner pseudostems are sometimes eaten.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow galanga as an understory planting beneath the west and east ends of the overstory, where it will benefit from the overstory shade.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Feed and water only when growth begins in spring
  • Galanga have few insect pests but several fungal diseases
  • They require warmth, shade, moisture, fertile soil and good drainage
  • Do not over fertilize, several light feedings are preferable to one heavy feeding
  • During the winter season the plants become dormant, and must be allowed to dry out
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive this plant as a rhizome which should be planted immediately in a light well draining mix in a pot just big enough to accommodate it. Water only sparingly until vegetative growth begins. At that point the plant can be planted in its permanent location. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin. When foliage dies down in autumn, cease feeding and allow the plants to dry out as they are dormant and do not require much water.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Alpinia galanga

 

#55W3-c :: Cucurma longa (Turmeric)

Cucurma longa, Turmeric, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Turmeric is a tropical herbaceous briefly deciduous perennial in the Zingiberaceae native to Asia. The pseudostems arise from underground rhizomes, which are the part usually used. They have been grown for thousands of years for their hot aromatic flavor, used both as a culinary ingredient and medicinally. The rhizomes contain complex essential oils and oleoresins and the inner pseudostems are sometimes eaten.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow turmeric as an understory planting beneath the west and east ends of the overstory, where it will benefit from the overstory shade.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Feed and water only when growth begins in spring
  • Turmeric have few insect pests but several fungal diseases
  • They require warmth, shade, moisture, fertile soil and good drainage
  • Do not over fertilize, several light feedings are preferable to one heavy feeding
  • During the winter season the plants become dormant, and must be allowed to dry out
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive this plant as a rhizome which should be planted immediately in a light well draining mix in a pot just big enough to accommodate it. Water only sparingly until vegetative growth begins. At that point the plant can be planted in its permanent location. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin. When foliage dies down in autumn, cease feeding and allow the plants to dry out as they are dormant and do not require much water.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Turmeric

 

#55W3-d :: Cucurma zedoaria (Zedoary)

Cucurma zedoaria, Zedoary, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Zedoary is a tropical herbaceous briefly deciduous perennial in the Zingiberaceae native to Asia. The pseudostems arise from underground rhizomes, which are the part usually used. They have been grown for thousands of years for their hot aromatic flavor, used both as a culinary ingredient and medicinally. The rhizomes contain complex essential oils and oleoresins. Inner pseudostems are sometimes eaten.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow zedoary as an understory planting beneath the west and east ends of the overstory, where it will benefit from the overstory shade.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Feed and water only when growth begins in spring
  • Zedoary has few insect pests but several fungal diseases
  • They require warmth, shade, moisture, fertile soil and good drainage
  • Do not over fertilize, several light feedings are preferable to one heavy feeding
  • During the winter season the plants become dormant, and must be allowed to dry out
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive zedoary as rhizomes. More details coming soon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Cucurma zedoaria

 

#56W3 :: Sechium edule (Chayote, Mirliton)

Sechium edule, Chayote, Mirliton, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Chayote is a scrambling vine in the Cucurbitaceae native to Central America. It produces a fruit that is eaten like zucchini, to which it is related. The plant is propagated by planting the entire fruit, which sprouts a new vine from the basal end. The plant forms a tuberous root, called camote in Mexico, which is also eaten. If the plant is killed by frost, new vines will regrow from the tuber.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow chayote as an understory Planting beneath the middle third of the overstory Row.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Vines should be adequately fed by overstory fertilizers
  • Vines are propagated by planting the whole fruit in the soil
  • The vines may be susceptible to cucumber beetle; unknown if they are on the Property.
  • Root harvest may not be advisable under the overstory, as it may disturb the root system
  • Chayote vines are vigorous, and will need to be kept from climbing high into the overstory
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive chayote as a whole fruit which is planted half it’s depth into the soil where they are to grow.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Chayote

 

NORTH WALL

#57W3 :: Carica sp. (Papaya)

Carica sp., Papaya, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodCarica sp. is a single-stemmed tropical herbaceous perennial native to the tropics where they have been grown for centuries. Papaya trees have a vertical growth habit, with flowers and fruit borne just beneath the leafy crown. They can be highly productive, yielding hundreds of fruits over their 5 to 7 year lifespan. The plant is used commercially as a meat tenderizer and has many medicinal uses as well.

The fruit of the papaya is oblong, from 1 to 10 lbs, and yellow to orange in color. Inside is a thick layer of highly nutritious, juicy, flesh surrounding a central cavity containing numerous brown to black seeds. The flesh is golden through pink/red in color with a soft melon-like texture and a unique rich flavor that is generally liked by most who try it. The seeds are sometimes added to salads for their hot, spicy flavor.

PLACEMENTS

In the Aquapini we will spot papayas into different locations on the west end of the slope plantings to take advantage of light wells between larger plants.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are generally replaced when they get too tall
  • They grow in tropical climates and are intolerant of frost
  • Plants are susceptible to Papaya Ringspot Virus (PRV)
  • Plants are considered dioecious but hermaphroditic forms are known
  • They like adequate moisture, but require excellent drainage to avoid root rot
  • Plants that grow too tall for convenient harvest can be cut; new shoots will form
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as seed which should be sown in a nursery tray and kept warm and moist until germination. When plants are 2-3” tall, dibble into 1 gal pots and grow on until plants have developed a good root system, then transplant where they are to stand. Wait to fertilize until plants show signs of active growth.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Carica

 

#58W3 :: Musa sp. (Banana, Plantain)

Musa, banana, plantain, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodBananas are herbaceous perennials in the Musaceae native to southern Asia. Most cultivated forms are seedless and are propagated from vegetative offsets. Each of the plants pseudostems will produce a large fruit bunch once, and then it dies and is removed. Dwarf varieties range from 4 to 8 feet in height. Stems cut after fruit production can be used as mulch, and make excellent animal fodder.

Banana fruit vary greatly in texture, color and flavor. Some, like the plantains, are best eaten baked or fried, while dessert types are eaten fresh. Bananas are high in potassium and soluble fiber. In the Philippines, the male flower bud is cooked and eaten like artichokes, and in East Africa the stems are processed for starch. Globally, bananas are one of the top three fruits in production volume.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow bananas along the north wall and the west wall north of the entrance.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Each clump should only be allowed to carry three stems at any one time
  • Due to the height limit on the north wall, dwarf varieties will be grown there
  • Fruit bunches should be left on the plant until the first hand colors, then cut
  • The plants are heavy feeders, and require frequent applications of N and K
  • Each pseudostem bears fruit once and is cut down, followed by the next pup
  • The male flower should be removed once all the hands have set on the bunch
  • As height increases southward on the west wall, taller varieties can be planted
  • Within the dwarf varieties we will choose for maximum diversity to extend season
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted corms. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Banana

#59W3 :: Passiflora edulis (Passionfruit)

Passiflora edulis, passionfruit, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Passionfruit is a twining vine native to the warm regions of the Americas. Vines climb by means of tendrils in the same manner as grape vines. The vines are hosts to several species of butterflies, who lay their eggs under the leaves. The vines have been cultivated in warm climates around the world for their delicious fruit. The fruits are the size of a hen’s egg and are purple or yellow when ripe.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow passionfruit on trellis along the north and west wall in Walapini #3. We will alternate passionfruit trellis with pitaya in order to enable self pollination or cross pollination as required.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant prefers a soil high in humus and organic matter
  • Improved varieties can be propagated by cutting or grafting
  • The fruit shell can sometimes be largely empty if nutrition is inadequate
  • Vines should be fertilized frequently but lightly during the growing season
  • Some species produce fruit with edible flesh inside the rind as well as arils
  • Passionfruit vines like consistent moisture in order to bear their large fruit crops
  • Pollinators include bees, butterflies and moths, wasps, flies, hummingbirds and bats
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive passionfruit as rooted cuttings or seeds. Rooted cuttings can be immediately planted where they are to grow. Seeds should be sown in a nursery flat  and kept warm and moist until germination. Plants can be dibbled into individual 4” pots until a strong root system is formed then planted in their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Passiflora edulis

 

#60W3 :: Passiflora quadrangularis (Tumbo, Badea)

Passiflora quadrangularis, Tumbo, Badea, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The tumbo is native to northern South America and is the largest-fruited species of Passiflora. It has a twining habit like most other Passifloras and climbs into the tree canopy in nature. The vines bear beautiful flowers that are red and purple petals with deep violet blue filaments. When pollinated these give rise to 1 to 2 pound fruits that contain a thick layer of flesh. The central core contains seeds and pulp.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the tumbo vines on the north and west wall trellis, alternating with pitaya in order to enable self pollination or cross pollination as required.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant prefers a soil high in humus and organic matter
  • Improved varieties can be propagated by cutting or grafting
  • The fruit shell can sometimes be largely empty if nutrition is inadequate
  • Vines should be fertilized frequently but lightly during the growing season
  • Some species produce fruit with edible flesh inside the rind as well as arils
  • Passionfruit vines like consistent moisture in order to bear their large fruit crops
  • Pollinators include bees, butterflies and moths, wasps, flies, hummingbirds and bats
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Tumbo as rooted cuttings or seeds. Rooted cuttings can be immediately planted where they are to grow. Seeds should be sown in a nursery flat  and kept warm and moist until germination. Plants can be dibbled into individual 4” pots until a strong root system is formed then planted in their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Passiflora quadrangularis

 

#61W3 :: Hylocereus sp. (Pitaya, Dragon fruit)

Hylocereus sp., pitaya, dragon fruit, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Pitaya are a group of vining cacti, mostly species of Hylocereus, that produce edible fruit. They are native to the rainforests of Central and South America, where they grow in trees. They have large showy white flowers that are pollinated by moths or occasionally by bats. After pollination, they produce fruits that are red or yellow with white, pink or deep red flesh. The flowers have been used for medicinal purposes.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow pitaya on the north and west wall trellis, alternating with Passiflora.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Pruning young vines will delay the onset of fruiting
  • Foliar feeding is the most efficient way to fertilize pitaya
  • Pitaya will tolerate more water than most terrestrial cacti
  • Pitaya have higher fertilizer requirements than most cacti
  • The plants require a strong trellis to support the weight of the vines and fruit
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive pitaya as rooted cuttings. The rooted cuttings can be planted immediately in their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Pitaya

 

WALIPINI 3 PURCHASING DETAILS

The following is a list of the retail purchasing price of all the plants that will be planted in Walipini #3. We are currently seeking companies that would like to partner with our 501(c)3 non-profit organization as specific providers of these plants to make duplication by the consumer easier. Visit our Win-Win-Win-Win page to understand our partnering philosophy and our Marketing and Promotional Engine Page for the specifics of how we can support those interested being a part of world change with One Community. These prices are rounded up to the nearest dollar and current as of September 2013.

NUMBER NAME PURCHASED FROM RECEIVED AS PRICE EA QTY TOTAL
#1W3 Breadfruit Ma’afala pineislandnursery.com Rooted Cutting $35 1 $35
#2W3 Jackfruit Mai 1 pineislandnursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#3W3 Mamey Magana pineislandnursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#4W3 Casturi frankiesnursery.com Plant $40 1 $40
#5W3 Sapodilla Alano pineislandnursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#6W3 Mabolo riversendnursery.com Plant $16 1 $16
#7W3 BlackSapote Emerich papayatreenursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#8W3 Jaboticaba pineislandnursery.com Plant $35 1 $35
#9W3 Avocado OroNegro pineislandnursery.com Graft $30 1 $30
#10W3 Avocado Russell pineislandnursery.com Graft $30 1 $30
#11W3 Avocado Simmonds pineislandnursery.com Graft $30 1 $30
#12W3 Abiu Caribou pineislandnursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#13W3 AnnonaKampongMauve pineislandnursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#14W3 Annona Lisa pineislandnursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#15W3 AnnonaPinksMammoth pineislandnursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#16W3 AnnonaPage pineislandnursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#17W3 Annona Priestly pineislandnursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#18W3 AnnonaGefner pineislandnursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#19W3 AnnonaBradley pineislandnursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#20W3 Eugenia stipitata pineislandnursery.com Plant $30 1 $30
#21W3 Eugenia aggregataBensBeaut papayatreenursery.com Plant $35 1 $35
#22W3 Eugenia aggregataBountifulHarvest papayatreenursery.com Plant $35 1 $35
#23W3 Eugenia luschnathianaCalif.Gold papayatreenursery.com Plant $35 1 $35
#24W3 Eugenia braziliensis pineislandnursery.com Plant $35 1 $35
#25W3 Eugenia involucrata colecionandofrutas.org Seed $15 1 $15
#26W3 Eugenia mattosii colecionandofrutas.org Seed $15 1 $15
#27W3 Eugenia speciosa colecionandofrutas.org Seed $15 1 $15
#28W3 Eugenia klotzchiana colecionandofrutas.org Seed $15 1 $15
#29W3 Eugenia neonitida colecionandofrutas.org Seed $15 1 $15
#30W3 Eugenia lutescens colecionandofrutas.org Seed $15 1 $15
#31W3 Eugenia pyriformis colecionandofrutas.org Seed $15 1 $15
#32W3-#42W3 Citrus wncitrus.com Graft $25 11 $275
#43W3 Sauropus echonet.org Rooted Cutting $5 16 $80
#44W3 Pineapple floridahillnursery.com Plants $7 75 $525
#45W3 Yam massspectrumbotanicals.com Tubers $6 25 $150
#46W3 Chile seedsavers.org Seed $30 1 $30
#47W3 Melon seedsavers.org Seed $30 1 $30
#48W3 Sweet Potato sandhillpreservation.com Slips $14 5 $70
#49W3 Jicama bountifulgardens.org Seed $3 2 $6
#50W3 Strawberry raintreenursery.com Plants $10 5 $50
#51W3 Solanum colecionandofrutas.org Seed $15 5 $75
#52W3 Moringa echonet.org Seed $5 1 $5
#53W3 Pennyroyal richters.com Plants $32 1 $32
#54W3 Mint richters.com Plants $25 1 $25
#55W3 Gingers caldwellhort.com Plants $15 12 $180
#56W3 Chayote mirlitons.org Plants $10 10 $100
#57W3 Papaya alohaseed.com Seed $3 20 $60
#58W3 Banana going-bananas.com Plants $24 29 $696
#59W3 Passionfruit floridahillnursery.com Plant $9 2 $18
#60W3 Tumbo rarexoticseeds.com Seed $3 1 $3
#61W3 Dragon fruit pineislandnursery.com Cuttings $35 3 $105
 TOTAL $3426
 PLUS 20%* $685
 GRAND TOTAL $4111

20% is built in for taxes, shipping, and any other unexpected charges or fees.

ZEN AQUAPINIS 1 & 2

TOTAL GROWING AREA FOR THESE STRUCTURES: 1,454 sq ft/135.1 sq m

These structures are purposed to produce a maximally diverse selection of foods grown in a beautiful environment most people would want to spend time in. They will provide two different environments, a cloud forest environment (55-80 degrees F/12.8-26.7 C) & 50-80% humidity) and a moist tropical environment (60-90 degrees F/16-32 C) & 50-90% humidity).

ZENAPINI 1

TOTAL GROWING AREA FOR THIS STRUCTURE: 1,454 sq ft/135.1 sq m
walipini, aquapini, aquaponics, food diversity, Highest Good food, open source food, One Community, for The Highest Good of All, sustainable food, eco-food, biodiversity, open source botanical garden, Cloud Forest

Zenapini 1 Planting Map – Click to Enlarge

OVERVIEW

HARVEST   ●   TREES   ●   MEDIA BEDS   ●   FLOOR   ●   SLOPE   ●   WATER   ●   CORNER   ●   DWC   ●   COST

Zenapini #1 will house a highly diverse range of plants. The focus of this structure will be to create a climatic zone that mimics the environment of the ecosystem known as cloud forest. This ecosystem is characterized by high humidity (50-80%) and cooler temperatures than tropical regions (55-80 degrees F/12.8-26.7C) and is generally frost free. Cloud forest plants are often highly endemic. Examples are the “sky island” mountain tops of the Sonoran Desert, the “tepuis” of Venezuela, and the slopes of Mt. Kinabalu in Borneo – all supporting a highly diverse flora that does not occur at the lower elevations or anywhere else in the world. This house will feature unusual food plants, medicinal plants, species with unusual life cycles, reproduction biology, industrial uses, or other economic applications. In addition to helping conserve these unique species, this Zenapini will also double as an aesthetically pleasing environment in which to relax and enjoy the atmosphere.

5-YEAR FOOD PRODUCTION PROJECTION AVERAGES

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE COMPLETE SPREADSHEET

FOOD YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR 4 YEAR 5
Veg 739 lbs 760 lbs 773 lbs 779 lbs 779 lbs
Other 87 lbs 149 lbs 158 lbs 161 lbs 164 lbs
AquaC 1,010 lbs 1,010 lbs 1,010 lbs 1,010 lbs 1,010 lbs
TOTAL 1,836 lbs 1,919 lbs 1,940 lbs 1,950 lbs 1,953 lbs

 

 COMPLETE INDIVIDUAL PLANT DETAILS

NOTE: Latin names are used first because they are universally accepted, with common names following in parenthesis. The index or reference number preceding each plant name is cross referenced to the planting cost analysis price list (coming soon) as well as the planting layout map above. The planting plan is not a firm declaration and may need to be modified as we continue to source plant material and/or on site (with ongoing updates here) after all plants are preliminarily sited. Every tree is listed but, due to the quantities of plants, not every individual plant is listed on the planting layout map.

TREES

#1Z1 :: Chiranthodendron pentadactylon (Hand flower tree)

Chiranthodendron pentadactylon, Macpalxochitl, Hand flower tree, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Chiranthodendron is a monotypic genus variously assigned to the Bombacaceae, Malvaceae, or Sterculiaceae. It is native to cloud forests of Mexico and Guatemala. The large scarlet flowers with five recurved exerted stamens look like a hand. These flowers have been used medicinally. The tree was revered by the Aztecs.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow the hand flower tree at the west end of the of the lower tier of the Planting Slope, where it will cast minimal shade and have maximum roof height.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Seed germination can be difficult
  • The hand flower tree is an endangered species
  • Flowers are pollinated by moths, bats, birds and bees
  • The tree can reach 90 feet but can be pruned much smaller
  • The tree withstands dry spells but grows best with much water
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Chiranthodendron as seeds or a small tree. If received as seed, these must be germinated. Seed should be sown on the surface and just covered; kept moist and warm, they should germinate in 45-60 days. If received as a plant, it can be planted in its permanent location, and watered in well.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Chiranthodendron

 

#2Z1 – #5Z1 :: Persea scheideana (Chucte)

Persea scheideana, Chucte, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Chucte is an evergreen tree in the Lauraceae native to the cloud forests of Southern Mexico and Guatemala. The tree produces an edible fruit that is used much like its relative, the avocado. Because it is native to the cool wet uplands, chucte is more resistant to fungal diseases than the avocado. The two species are graft compatible, and hybridization is possible. The species is threatened by habitat loss.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow chucte trees against the north wall in the spaces between the media beds.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The trees have similar requirements as the avocado
  • The fruit flesh in some clones has grit cells like a pear
  • Chucte can grow to 50 feet but is kept smaller by pruning
  • Although resistant to root fungus, trees require good drainage
  • The chucte fruit have a different coconut-like flavor than avocado
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive chucte as seeds or scions. If received as seeds, they must be germinated and grown until they have a full root system in a 5 gal. container, and then planted in their permanent location. If received as scions, they will be grafted onto the hardiest avocado rootstocks such as Mexicola or TopaTopa.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Persea scheideana

 

MEDIA BEDS

#6Z1 :: Houttuynia cordata (Vap Ca)

Houttuynia cordata, Vap Ca, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Houttuynia cordata is a fast-growing, herbaceous perennial plant from S.E. Asia. It is a low, creeping, mat-forming herb that spreads by rhizomes. Both the leaves and the rhizomes are used in Asian cooking. They have a distinctive spicy flavor that goes well in a variety of dishes. The plant is also used medicinally to treat lung infections and also used as an antiviral, antibacterial, and a general detoxifier.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Houttuynia in one of the growing beds along the north wall where it will benefit from the shade of the fruit trees.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant prefers at least some shade, and will not withstand frost
  • Cultivation in the planting bed will assist in harvesting the thin rhizomes
  • Plants prefers abundant moisture, and can grow in standing water or wet soil
  • In areas of regular rainfall the plant has escaped cultivation and is considered weedy
  • We will keep Houttuynia in the planting bed until its weedy potential can be assessed
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Houttuynia cordata

 

#7Z1 :: Limnophila aromatica (Rau Om)

Limnophila, aromatica, Rau Om, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Limnophila aromatica is a creeping herb in the Plantaginaceae native to S. E. Asia. It is used extensively in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand as an edible green. The plant is aquatic to amphibious, and will grow fully submerged, in standing water or moist soil, in partial shade to full sun. Rau om  is a tender tropical herb and it’s flavor has been described as “a beguiling floral character” or “lemon zest and cumin”.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Limnophila in the middle bed along the north wall of Zenapini 1 where it will benefit from the shade of the adjacent  trees.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants will not tolerate frost and have no invasive potential outside the tropics
  • The plant is cultivated in manured rice paddies, and can utilize high nitrogen loads
  • The plant will be kept in the Aquaponic system until its weediness can be determined
  • Related species of Limnophila are used fully submerged in aquaria as decorative plants
  • In areas with regular rainfall, the plant has escaped cultivation, and is considered weedy
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Limnophila aromatica

 

#8Z1 :: Centella asiatica (Gotu Kola)

Centella asiatica, Gotu Kola, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Gotu cola is a creeping tender perennial in the Umbelliferae, native to the Old World tropics and subtropics. It is highly valued in traditional Chinese medicine as a tonic. A few leaves eaten daily are said to improve mental clarity, increase vitality, and lengthen one’s life. The leaves are eaten or dried for tea. Science has found a number of beneficial effects, including antiviral and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Centella in the middle bed along the north wall of  Zenapini 1 where it will benefit from the shade of the adjacent  trees.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Gotu cola requires a frost-free climate
  • They grow best in soils of high fertility
  • Centella prefers partial shade to full sun
  • The plant is easily propagated by root divisions
  • They require steady moisture, and suffer with prolonged drought
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. The rooted cutting can be planted directly in the wick beds and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Centella asiatica

 

#9Z1 :: Saururus cernuus (Lizards tail)

Saururus cernuus, Lizards tail, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Lizards tail is a creeping herbaceous perennial in the Saururaceae, native to eastern North America. The plant grows in shallow water or moist soil along the edges of ponds, streams, and marshes. The leaves are lanceolate with a cordate base; leaf petioles clasp the stem. Flowers occur opposite leaves, and are upright spikes with drooping tips. The whole plant is used medicinally.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow lizards tail in one of the wick beds along the north wall of Zenapini 1.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant prefers partial shade to full sun
  • The plant is burned to the ground by frost
  • Lizards tail grows best in soils of high fertility
  • Saururus cernuus is easily propagated by root divisions
  • Plants require steady moisture, and suffers with prolonged drought
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these as rooted cuttings. The rooted cuttings can be planted in the wick bed immediately and watered in well.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Saururus cernuus

FLOOR PLANTINGS

#10Z1 :: Deppea splendens

Deppea splendens, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Deppea splendens is a shrub in the Rubiaceae that was endemic to the cloud forest of Chiapas, where it is now extinct in the wild. The one seed collection that was made by Dr Dennis Breedlove has been preserved in botanical gardens. Recently viable seeds have been produced. This makes it possible to repatriate this species to Mexico, and points out the importance of botanical conservation.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Deppea splendens in the planting bed north of the deep water pond just west of the central bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants do best with high humidity
  • The plant does not tolerate more than very light frost
  • Deppea splendens is very exacting in it requirements
  • The plant does not tolerate drought or hot dry weather
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these as small rooted cuttings of as many clones as possible. The young plants should be grown on to a 1 gal. size before planting in their permanent location

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

SF Botanical Garden  – Deppea spendens

 

#11Z1 :: Saurauia sp.

Saurauia sp., aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Saurauia is a genus of about 200 species of small trees in the Actinidiaceae. They are native to the montane forests of S.E Asia and Latin America. The clusters of white and yellow flowers are followed by small green berries said to be edible in some species. The new growth of some species is covered with a red to purple indument. A number of species have reported uses as pain relievers; the chemistry is unknown.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Saurauia on the north edge of the deep water culture near its west end to take advantage of the roof height there.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The trees require good drainage
  • Young plants prefer some shade
  • Plants prefer regular light feedings
  • Pollination requirements are uncertain
  • Saurauia require steady moisture and moderate temperatures
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Saurauia as seed or rooted cuttings. If received as seed, they should be sown on a free draining mix and kept warm until germination. Seedlings should be potted on until they have reached 1 gal size then planted in their permanent location. Rooted cutting should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Saurauia

 

#12Z1 :: Polylepis sp.

Polylepis sp., aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Polylepis is a genus of 28 evergreen trees and shrubs in the Rosaceae native to the high Andes mountains. They are unusual in the Rosaceae in being wind pollinated. They have a twisted habit and thick peeling bark, and were the keystone species of a unique ecotype. Polylepis’s habitat has been severely degraded, and only remnants are left. Their hard dense wood is used for fuel, and they are used medicinally.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Polylepis in the planting bed south of chucte #3Z1. We will receive these as seed or small plants

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Polylepis trees are slow growing
  • Polylepis is drought tolerant once established
  • It is thought Polylepis seeds are bird dispersed
  • The plants are adapted to large diurnal temperature changes
  • The trees prefer cloud forest conditions, but can establish elsewhere
PLANTING GUIDELINES

If received as seed, they should be sown immediately. Germination may be erratic. Seedlings should be potted on until they are 1gal. sized, them planted in their permanent location. Young plants should be also grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Polylepis

 

#12Z1-b :: Cavendishia spp.

Cavendishia, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cavendishia is a genus of 100 species of woody perennials in the Ericaceae. They are native to montane tropical forests of Latin America, usually growing as epiphytes. Cavendishia have very showy pendant flowers that are generally pollinated by hummingbirds. These are followed by red to purple edible blueberry-like fruits. The plants produce large lignotubers up to a meter in size which are used medicinally.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Cavendishia in the planting bed south of Tree #3Z1

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants like filtered light to part shade
  • Cavendishia prefers an acid soil mix
  • Plants do best with frequent light feedings
  • If grown in the soil, plants require excellent drainage
  • Plants will produce larger lignotubers when grown epiphytically
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Cavendishia as seed or rooted cuttings. If received as seed, it should be planted immediately in a free draining mix and kept warm until germination. Seedlings should be potted on until they are 1 gal. size, and then placed in their permanent location. Rooted cuttings should also be grown on until they are 1 gal size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Cavendishia

 

#13Z1 :: Casimiroa pringlei (Pringle’s sapote)

Casimiroa pringlei, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Casimiroa pringlei is a shrubby drought deciduous species to 6 feet in the Rutaceae native to high elevation forests of Nuevo Leon, Mexico. This rare species differs from the white sapote in its smaller shrubby habit and in being much more cold hardy (to 4F). It bears an edible loquat sized fruit with a subacid flavor. The two species appear to be graft compatible, and may hybridize. The species is threatened with habitat loss.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow pringle’s sapote in the planting bed south of chucte #5Z1.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant is host to several butterfly larvae
  • Plants would benefit from organic mulche
  • Pringle’s sapote does best with regular watering
  • Fertilizer requirements are unknown; treat as citrus
  • Plants are subject to scale, treat with rotenone or soap spray
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Pringle’s sapote as seed. The seeds have short viability and should be planted immediately. Seedlings should be potted on until they reach 1 gal size before planting out.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Southeast garden –  Casimiroa pringlei

#14Z1 :: Montanoa sp.

Montanoa sp., aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Montanoa is a genus of approximately 35 species of large shrubs or trees in the Asteraceae, native to the cloud forests of Mesoamerica. They can reach 30 feet but are generally smaller. The leaves are opposite, deeply divided or lobed, with petioles partly winged and it flowers in panicles, white and yellow. These species have been cultivated since the Aztec period for their showy flowers and medicinal properties.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Montanoa in the planting bed east of the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Montanoa needs good drainage
  • The entire plant has a distinctive fragrance
  • They can withstand dry periods if not prolonged
  • Some species can be difficult to propagate, others self-seed
  • The plants are not heavy feeders, but respond well to fertilizers
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Montanoa as seed or small plants. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Montanoa

 

#15Z1 :: Bocconia sp. (Llorasangre)

Bocconia sp., Llorasangre, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Bocconia is a genus of approximately 10 species trees or shrubs in the Papaveraceae, native to Mesoamerica. The plants have deeply lobed grey-green leaves, small flowers in panicles held above the foliage, and can reach 15 feet. They have many medicinal uses; scientific study has validated many of the uses in folk medicine. Llorasangre has naturalized in Hawaii, and is considered invasive there.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Bocconia in the planting bed north of the easter bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants can resprout from the roots
  • The plants need little to no fertilizer
  • Bocconia adapts to a wide range of soils
  • Plants grow rapidly under favorable conditions
  • Plants grow in open forest conditions, but dislike deep shade
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Bocconia as seed or small plants. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Bocconia

 

#16Z1 :: Methysticodendron amesianum

Methysticodendron amesianum, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Methysticodendron amesianum is a monotypic genus in the Solanaceae, narrowly endemic to the Sibundoy Valley in the highlands of Colombia. It is thought to be an anthropogenic species, created by humans through generations of selection from Brugmansia. Shamans of the Kamsa and Ingano tribes use this plant as a divinatory dream inducer. Some authorities place this species in Brugmansia, rather than a separate genus.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Methysticodendron in the planting bed north of the eastern bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant will not tolerate frost
  • Plants respond well to fertilizer
  • Plants require steady supply of moisture
  • Plants like bright filtered light, not hot direct sun
  • The species is sterile, cuttings the only means of propagation
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Methysticodendron amesianum as a rooted cutting. The small plant received should  be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Natural Pedia – Methysticodendron amesianum

 

#17Z1 :: Dendroseris sp. (Cabbage tree)

Dendroseris sp., Cabbage tree, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Dendroseris is a genus of 11 species of arborescent Asteraceae, endemic to the Juan Fernandez Archipelago. They plants are highly endangered by habitat loss and introduced goats. They are branched trees and shrubs with large leaves in terminal clusters. The leaves of at least one species, D. littoralis, are known to be edible, giving the plant its common name of “cabbage tree”.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Dendroseris sp. in the planting bed northeast of the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees prefer afternoon shade
  • Plants require cloud forest conditions
  • Plants require steady supply of moisture
  • Plants respond well to light applications of fertilizer
  • Plants can grow rapidly under optimum conditions
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Dendroseris sp. as seed or small plants. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Dendroseris

 

#18Z1 :: Scalesia sp.

Scalesia sp., aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Scalesia is a genus of 15 species of arborescent Asteraceae, endemic to the Galapagos Archipelago. They are all threatened by habitat loss and introduced goats. Scalesia are among the largest and fastest growing species of Asteraceae; S. pedunculata can reach 60 feet in a few years. They tend to grow in pure stands, and die at the same time, creating a seedbed for the next generation of seedlings.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Scalesia in the planting bed east of the west bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • Light fertilization is preferable
  • Scalesia require steady moisture
  • Young plants appreciate partial shade
  • Plants have soft pithy wood which enables rapid growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Scalesia as seed or small plants. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Scalesia

#18Z1-b :: Agapetes sp.

Agapetes sp., aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Agapetes is a genus of about 130 woody perennials in the Ericaceae. They are native to montane tropical forests of the Himalayas, usually growing as epiphytes. Agapetes have very showy pendant flowers probably pollinated by moths or bees. These are followed by red to purple edible blueberry-like fruits. The plants produce large lignotubers up to a meter in size which are used medicinally.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Agapetes in the planting bed south of chucte #3Z1 beneath the Polylepis.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Agapetes prefer an acid soil mix
  • Plants like filtered light to partial shade
  • Plants do best with frequent light feedings
  • If grown in the soil, plants require excellent drainage
  • Plants will produce larger lignotubers when grown epiphytically
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Agapetes as seed or rooted cuttings. If received as seed, it should be planted immediately in a free draining mix and kept warm until germination. Seedlings should be potted on until they are 1 gal. size, and then placed in their permanent location. Rooted cuttings should also be grown on until they are 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Agapetes

 

#19Z1 :: Satyrium sp.

Satyrium sp., aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Satyrium is a genus of about 90 species of terrestrial herbs in the Orchidaceae native to Africa and Madagascar. They die back to the tubers during the winter dry season, reappearing with the summer rain. The tubers are collected for food by various African tribes; wild populations are threatened by overcollection. The tubers are also used medicinally against malaria, dysentery and as a tonic.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Satyrium in the planting bed south of chucte #5Z1.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants require high humidity
  • They should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Plants need a very free draining soil, gravel or sand
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Satyrium as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Satyrium

 

#20Z1 :: Disa sp. (Orchid)

Disa sp.,aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Disa is a genus of approximately 200 species in the Orchidaceae, native to southern and eastern Africa. Most species bear flowers ranging in color from white to purple. They are terrestrial, with upright herbaceous stems and inflorescences held above the whorls of leaves. Disa are unusual in having multiple pollinator types. The bulbs and tubers are eaten, made into sweetener, and used medicinally.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Disa in the planting bed northwest of the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plant require high humidity
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants can get root rot if drainage is not perfect, gravel is best
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Disa as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Disa (orchid)

 

#21Z1 :: Hesperomeles sp.

Hesperomeles, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Hesperomeles is a genus of 12 species in the Rosaceae, native to the Andean cloud forests. They are shrubs or small trees to 15 feet. The  species have alternate lanceolate leaves with serrate margins. they have white five petaled flowers, followed by round fleshy pome fruits. These are eagerly gathered by people in its native range. The trees are often found in remnants of Polylepis forest.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Hesperomeles in the planting bed south of chucte #2Z1.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees need good drainage
  • The trees are slow growing
  • They will grow in part shade to full sun
  • Hesperomeles is drought tolerant once established
  • The plants are adapted to large diurnal temperature changes
  • The trees prefer cloud forest conditions, but can establish elsewhere
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Hesperomeles as seed or small plants. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Hesperomeles

 

#22Z1 :: Bletilla striata

Bletilla striata, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Bletilla is a genus of 9 terrestrial tuberous orchids native to Asia. They are more tolerant of cool weather than most orchids, being hardy into temperate zones. The racemes of white to purple flowers emerge from the center of new growth. The pseudobulbs will expand into sizable colonies if left undisturbed. The plant is used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to purify the blood, increase clotting, and as a euphoriant to improve mood.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Bletilla in the planting bed east of the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants require high humidity
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Plants are terrestrial and need a rich well drained soil
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Bletilla as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Bletilla

 

#23Z1 :: Macleania sp.

Macleania sp., aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Macleania is a genus of about 80 species of woody perennial in the Ericaceae. These plants are native to montane tropical forests of Latin America, usually growing as epiphytes. They have very showy pendant flowers that are generally pollinated by hummingbirds. These are followed by red to purple edible blueberry-like fruits. The plants produce large lignotubers up to a meter in size which are used medicinally.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Macleania in the bed south of Tree #3Z1.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Macleania prefers an acid soil mix
  • Plants like filtered light to part shade
  • Plants do best with frequent light feedings
  • If grown in the soil, plants require excellent drainage
  • Plants will produce larger lignotubers when grown epiphytically
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Macleania as seed or as rooted cuttings. If received as seed, it should be planted immediately in a free draining mix and kept warm until germination. Seedlings should be potted on until they are 1 gal. size, and then placed in their permanent location. Rooted cuttings  should also be grown on until they are 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Macleania

 

#24Z1 :: Jumellea fragrans

Jumellea fragrans, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Jumellea fragrans is a small, branching, epiphytic, hot to cool growing orchid native to several Indian Ocean islands. It grows in the upland evergreen forests on Mauritius, Comoros and Madagascar and is endangered in the wild. In the late 18oo’s the plant was sold in France as “faham tea”, a digestive aid. Its aromatic flavor is due to coumarins and it has been used by indigenous people against tuberculosis.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Jumellea fragrans epiphytically in the planting bed east of the western bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants require high humidity
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Plants are epiphytes and need a supporting substrate
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Jumellea fragrans as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Orchid species – Jumellea fragrans

 

#25Z1 :: Annona cherimola (Cherimoya)

Annona cherimola (Cherimoya), aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The cherimoya is a small frost sensitive tree native to the highlands of Latin America. The trees are 15-25 ft in nature, but can be kept 8-15 feet by pruning. Mature trees can be very productive if their cultural requirements are met. Pollination requirements are not fully understood for the cherimoya; many insect species are involved. Cherimoyas are partly deciduous during the winter months.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow cherimoya in the planting bed south of chucte #4Z1.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees should be pruned to form wide lateral branches
  • In very wet soils, A. glabra should be used as rootstock
  • Graft compatibility is still being worked out for many species
  • Bearing is influenced by adequate nutrition, especially micronutrients
  • Water regularly as trees will drop leaves and fruit if they are drought-stressed
  • Leaves contain insecticidal compounds, and may be useful companion plants
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive cherimoya as grafted trees. For grafted trees, we will seek out the smallest sizes possible, both to reduce costs and to have the option of training and shaping the tree prior to planting. These will be up-potted to a larger size (typically 5 gal.) and grown on for a year while the infrastructure is built. When ready, the tree will be planted into a hole dug slightly larger than the pot size, taking care not to plant it too high or too deep. The plant is then watered in thoroughly and mulched to prevent weed competition. No fertilizer is to be placed in the planting hole; the first fertilization takes place after the tree begins actively growing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Annona

 

#26Z1 :: Dendrobium nobile

Dendrobium nobile, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

This is a terrestrial, lithophytic, or epiphytic orchid native to mountainous regions of Southeast Asia. The species has been an important ingredient in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for thousands of years called “shi hu”. The plant is rich in compounds called phenanthrenes and is shown to have many uses such as stimulating the immune system, suppressing tumors, and lowering blood pressure.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Dendrobium nobile epiphytically in the planting bed east of the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants require high humidity and bright light
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • If grown as epiphytes they need a supporting substrate
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
  • It is sympodial, or clump-forming and when left alone will increase in size over time
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Dendrobium nobile as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Dendrobium nobile

 

#27Z1 :: Goodyera schlechtendaliana

Goodyera schlechtendaliana, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Goodyera schlechtendaliana is a small evergreen shade-loving cool to warm growing orchid native to the high mountain forests of southern Asia. The inflorescence arises from the whorl of dark green leaves with yellow splotches. The plant has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as a sedative and anticonvulsant. It contains goodyerin and goodyeroside B, which is shown to have powerful central nervous system effects.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Goodyera in the planting bed east of the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants require high humidity
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants are terrestrial and need a fast draining substrate
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Goodyera as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Orchid Species – Goodyera schlechtendaliana

 

#28Z1 :: Leptotes bicolor

 Leptotes bicolor, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Leptotes bicolor is a small, epiphytic, cool to warm growing orchid native to Paraguay and southern Brazil. The pseudobulbs are enclosed in a basal sheath; each pseudobulb gives rise to a single leaf. The seed pods are fragrant and are used in Brazil to flavor ice cream exactly as we would use vanilla. The plants grow in cooler conditions than Vanilla.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Leptotes epiphytically in the planting bed west of the east bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants require high humidity
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Plants are epiphytes and need a supporting substrate
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Leptotes bicolor as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Orchid species – Leptotes bicolor

 

#29Z1 :: Haloragis sp.

Haloragis sp., aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Haloragis is a small genus of mostly southern hemisphere annual and perennial herbs and shrubs. They are moisture loving terrestrial to semi-aquatic plants who are threatened with habitat loss and found primarily in Australia, New Zealand and southern South America. One species, H. platycarpa, was only recently rediscovered in Western Australia after being presumed extinct; it inhabits an area of half a square kilometer.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Haloragis sp. in the planting bed east of the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants prefer acid soils
  • Plants require abundant moisture
  • Plants are intolerant of phosphorus
  • Haloragis prefer bright light but not hot sun
  • Plants can be propagated from seed or cuttings
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Haloragis as seed or small plants. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Haloragis

 

#30Z1 :: Tridactyle tricuspis

Tridactyle tricuspis, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Tridactyle tricuspis is an epiphytic, hot to cool growing orchid native to montane forests in East Africa. The dark green strap-like leaves are borne near the apex of the upright stems. Inflorescences arise in fall carrying about a dozen flowers that are nocturnally fragrant. The plant has been used by traditional healers “against madness”. The chemistry of this species appears to be unknown.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Tridactyle epiphytically in the planting bed west of the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Tridactyle tricuspis requires high humidity
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Plants are epiphytes and need a supporting substrate
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Tridactyle tricuspis as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Orchid Species  – Tridactyle tricuspis

 

#31Z1 :: Fuchsia sp.

Fuchsia, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Fuchsia is a genus of 110 species in the Onagraceae, mostly native to Latin America, although a few are found in New Zealand and Tahiti. They are mostly subshrubs 1-2 feet in height, but one species F. excorticata is a tree to 50 feet. The flowers are pendant pink/red/purple, and mainly pollinated by hummingbirds. These are followed by bright edible berries, ranging in taste from “citrus and pepper” to “bland” to “odd”.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Fuchsia in the planting bed west of the east bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants prefer acid soils
  • Plants need regular watering
  • They do best with frequent light feedings
  • Fuchsias like bright filtered light, but not hot sun
  • A few species can withstand freezing, most are intolerant
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Fuchsia as small plants which should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Fuchsia

 

#32Z1 :: Gunnera sp.

Gunnera sp., aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Gunnera is the only genus in the Gunneraceae, comprised of about 40 species. They are among the oldest living families of flowering plants. They vary enormously in size, like G. manicata and G. tinctoris with meter-wide leaves on ten foot stalks, to diminutive ground covers with leaves an inch in diameter. All Gunnera require moist subtropical frost-free conditions. The leaf stalks of some species are eaten like rhubarb.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Gunnera in the planting bed south of the sunken ramp.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Propagate by dividing the rhizomes in the Winter/early Spring
  • Plants prefer cool weather but are burned to the ground by frost
  • In cool wet climates the plant can self seed and could be potentially invasive
  • Gunneras like constant moisture, and constant cool temperatures above freezing
  • Gunnera species have endophytic Nostoc cyanobacteria that aid the plants nutrition
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Gunnera as seed or small plants. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Gunnera

 

#33Z1 :: Lapageria rosea (Copihue)

Lapageria rosea, Copihue, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Lapageria is a monotypic genus in the Philesiaceae, native to the cool temperate rainforests of southern Chile. The showy, pendant, deep pink to red blooms are Chile’s national flower. It is a twining evergreen vine with alternate lanceolate leaves. The flowers are hummingbird pollinated, followed by a berry with edible aril. These were gathered by the Mapuche people, who also ate the roots and used them medicinally like sarsaparilla.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Lapageria on a trellis in the planting bed northeast of the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plants prefer partial shade
  • Plants respond to frequent light feedings
  • Copihue are intolerant of prolonged drought
  • Plants are best propagated by cuttings or root division
  • Seeds have delayed germination and may take years to sprout
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Copihue as small plants which should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Lapageria

 

#34Z1 :: Anoectochilus formosanus

Anoectochilus formosanus, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Anoectochilus is a genus of 50 species in the Orchidaceae, found in moist forest shade in Asia, Australia, and the Pacific islands. They are terrestrial or lithophilic plants, with a central inflorescence. The species is mycorrhizal with Rhizoctonia sp. It is native to Taiwan, where it is considered a “King Medicine” and is used for its hepatoprotective, anxiolytic, and antioxidant properties.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Anoectochilus in the planting bed northeast of the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Anoectochilus formosanus require high humidity
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • They are epiphytes and need a supporting substrate
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Anoectochilus as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Anoectochilus

 

#35Z1 :: Chenopodium sanctae-clarae

Chenopodium sanctae-clarae, Santa Clara Goosefoot, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Chenopodium sanctae-clarae is a woody evergreen shrub in the Amaranthaceae, endemic to the Juan Fernandez Islands. It is related to many edible greens and seeds such as huazontle, quinoa, and good king henry. This species is highly endangered; only about 100 plants remain. It’s leaves are edible and nutritious, and possibly the seeds as well. Cultivation is essential to ensure it’s survival.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Chenopodium sanctae-clarae in the planting bed northeast of the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Chenopodium need steady moisture
  • Plants should receive bright light but avoid direct sun
  • The species is endemic to a cool moist frost free habitat
  • Chenopods respond well to organic fertilizers and mulch
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Chenopodium sanctae-clarae as seed. Seeds should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be potted on until they have reached 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Chenopodioideae

 

#36Z1 :: Desfontainia spinosa (Taique)

Desfontainia spinosa (Taique), aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Taique is a monotypic evergreen shrub to 6 feet with shiny holly-like leaves and orange flowers with yellow tips. It has been placed in the Loganiaceae, Potaliaceae, Desfontainiaceae and now the Columelliaceae family. This plant is native to montane Andean forests from southern Columbia to Chile. Taique occasionally grows as an epiphyte. It is used medicinally and as a hallucinogen by indigenous people.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow taique in the planting bed north of the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants require abundant moisture
  • Taique benefits from an acid mulch
  • Desfontainia spinosa is slow growing
  • Taique is an understory plant and requires partial shade
  • This plant is a native of acid soils, and will not grow on limestone
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive taique as a small plant which should be grown on to a 1 gal. size before planting in it’s permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Desfontainia

 

#37Z1 :: Oncidium cebolleta

Oncidium cebolleta, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Oncidium cebolleta is an epiphytic, hot to cool growing orchid native to Mesoamerica. It blooms in late winter to spring; the flowering raceme arising from the mature pseudobulb. The specific epithet refers to the onion-like foliage. The plant has allegedly been used as an entheogen by indigenous groups, but specifics are not known. Studies have shown the presence of phenanthrene compounds.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Oncidium cebolleta epiphytically in the planting bed east of the western bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Oncidium cebolleta requires high humidity
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Plants are epiphytes and need a supporting substrate
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Oncidium cebolleta as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Orchid species – Oncidium cebolleta

 

SLOPE PLANTINGS

#38Z1 :: Podachenium eminens

Podachaenium eminens, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Podachaenium eminens is an arborescent species in the Asteraceae native to the Mesoamerican cloud forests. It can reach 25 feet in height, with large leaves up to 2 feet in diameter. The leaves release a spicy fragrance when rubbed or crushed. The white and orange flowers are borne above the foliage in large clusters. The plant is used medicinally, and contains several sesquiterpene lactones.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Podachaenium eminens in the planting bed east of the west bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant needs good drainage
  • The entire plant has a distinctive fragrance
  • The species can be difficult to propagate, germination erratic
  • The plants are not heavy feeders, but respond well to fertilizers
  • Podachaenium eminens can withstand dry periods if not prolonged
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Podachaenium eminens as seed or rooted cuttings. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Rooted cuttings received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Strange Wonderful Things – Podachaenium eminens

 

#39Z1 :: Bomarea sp.

Bomarea sp., aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Bomarea is a genus of about 100 species in the Alstromeriaceae, native to the Neotropics. They are found in cool moist upland forests in the Andes and to a lesser extent in Mesoamerica and the Caribbean. They are generally twining vines but are occasionally herbs. The plants produce storage tubers that are edible like small potatoes. They are widely grown for the beautiful flowers in suitable climates.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Bomarea on a trellis on the west wall of the upper tier of the slope planting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are frost intolerant
  • Plants like a soil rich in organic matter
  • Most species need a support for the vines
  • Plants respond well to frequent light feeding
  • Bomarea grow in part shade to bright filtered light
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Bomarea as seed or as small plants. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Bomarea

 

#40Z1 :: Eulophia cucullata

Eulophia cucullata, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Eulophia is a genus of 210 species in the Orchidaceae, occurring mainly in Africa. They are generally terrestrial species growing in a wide range of habitats. This plant has tuberous roots that store large amounts of food and have been eaten by various African tribes. Some species form mycorrhizal symbiosis. They are used in indigenous medicine, and exhibit CNS activity when used to treat epilepsy.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Eulophia in the west end of the upper tier of the planting slope.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plant requires high humidity and bright light
  • Plants are terrestrial and need good drainage
  • Eulophia should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Eulophia as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Eulophia

 

#41Z1 :: Habenaria sp.

Habenaria, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Habenaria is a genus of 800 species of terrestrial plants in the Orchidaceae, native to tropical through temperate zones worldwide. They generally inhabit moist forest floors or bogs and are deciduous perennials, growing each year from underground tubers. These have been used to treat “leprosy and unconsciousness” and “stimulate youthfulness and vigor”. They are also eaten or made into starch.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Habenaria in the west side of the upper tier of the slope planting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Habenaria requires high humidity and partial shade
  • Plants need a very free draining soil, gravel or sand
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Habenaria as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Habenaria

 

#42Z1 :: Solanum pectinatum (Naranjilha)

Solanum pectinatum, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Solanum pectinatum is another species called “naranjilla” like Solanum quitoense. This “naranjilla” species is armed with sharp prickles on the stems and the mid vein of the large leaves. The fruits are similar, but S. pectinatum fruits are fuzzy. The botany of the edible fruited Neotropical Solanums is in need of revision. Meanwhile, these local species need conservation through cultivation.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Solanum pectinatum in the middle of the upper tier of the slope planting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants need a constantly moist root zone
  • Plants are most productive with frequent light feedings
  • The plants are grown like their close relative the tomato
  • Like tomatoes, plants are susceptible to a range of insect pests
  • Superior clones are propagated from cuttings which root easily
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Solanum pectinatum as seed. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Naturalist  – Solanum pectinatum

 

#43Z1 :: Solanum muricatum (Pepino dulce)

Solanum muricatum, Pepino dulce, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Pepino dulce is a shrubby evergreen perennial in the Solanaceae native to high Andean valleys from Colombia to Chile. It has been cultivated for many centuries and is unknown in the wild. The purple star shaped flowers are followed with a 6-8” round to oblong fruit with pale yellow skin and purple stripes. They have the flavor of a melon, and are widely appreciated in their native lands. Several cultivars are known.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow pepino dulce in the east end of the upper tier of the slope plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants need a constantly moist root zone
  • Plants are most productive with frequent light feedings
  • The plants are grown like their close relative the tomato
  • Like tomatoes, plants are susceptible to a range of insect pests
  • Superior clones are propagated from cuttings which root easily
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive pepino dulce as seeds or rooted cuttings. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Solanum muricatum

 

#44Z1 :: Selenipedium chica

Selenipedium chica, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Selenipedium chicha is an upright terrestrial orchid to 10 feet native to Central and northern South America. The plants have deeply corrugated leaves along the upright stems with flowers borne at the tips of the canes. The seed pods were formerly gathered from the forest as a kind of wild vanilla, used for flavoring. The six species of Selenipedium are endangered due to habitat loss.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Selenipedium in the west end of the middle tier of the planting slope.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plant requires high humidity
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants are tall terrestrials and need a supporting substrate
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Selenipedium as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Selenipedium

 

#45Z1 :: Epipactis helleborine

Epipactis helleborine, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Epipactis helleborine is one of 70 species of Epiactis found in subtropical to temperate climates. They are mycorrhizal orchids, dependent on association with specialized fungi. Because of this symbiosis, they have a reduced need for chlorophyll. These plants have alternate lanceolate leaves, and flowers in terminal racemes. Although many species are protected, Epipactis helleborine is considered invasive. They are used as sedatives.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Epipactis in the west end of the middle tier of the planting slope.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plant requires high humidity
  • Plants are terrestrial and need a free draining soil
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Epipactis helleborine as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Epipactis helleborine

 

#46Z1 :: Solanum robustrum (Jua-acu)

Solanum robustrum, Jua-acu, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Jua-acu is a shrub to perhaps eight feet in the Solanaceae, native to the Mata Atlantica rainforest of southern Brazil. The plant has deeply lobed alternate leaves up to a foot long. The fruits are spherical, green ripening pale yellow, with purple stripes, and superficially resemble pepino dulce. The plants however are much different. This species is highly recommended for commercial cultivation by Brazilian agronomists.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow jua-acu on the west of the middle tier of the slope planting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants need a constantly moist root zone
  • Plants are most productive with frequent light feedings
  • The plants are grown like their close relative the tomato
  • Like tomatoes, plants are susceptible to a range of insect pests
  • Superior clones are propagated from cuttings which root easily
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive jua-acu as seed. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Bananas raras – Solanum robustrum

 

#47Z1 :: Solanum grandiflorum (Jito)

Solanum grandiflorum, Jito, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Jito is a perennial shrub 12 to 15 feet in the Solanaceae, native to the Mata Atlantica rainforest of southern Brazil. The plant has lobed alternate leaves 6-8” long. The fruits are spherical, large (up to 1 pound), green, with a sweet pulp reminiscent of apple and pear. This species is little known outside its native area and is highly recommended for commercial cultivation by Brazilian agronomists.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow jito in the middle of the middle tier of the slope planting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants need a constantly moist root zone
  • Plants are most productive with frequent light feedings
  • The plants are grown like their close relative the tomato
  • Like tomatoes, plants are susceptible to a range of insect pests
  • Superior clones are propagated from cuttings which root easily
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive jito as seed. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Bananas raras – Solanum grandiflorum

 

#48Z1 :: Dendrobium teretifolium

aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

This is a terrestrial, lithophilic or epiphytic orchid native to mountainous regions of Southeast Asia. It is sympodial, or clump-forming, and if left alone it will increase in size over time. The species has been an important ingredient in TCM for thousands of years called “shi hu”. The plant is rich in compounds called phenanthrenes. The plant is shown to stimulate the immune system, suppress tumors, relieve pain, etc.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Dendrobium teretifolium epiphytically on the east side of the middle tier of the planting slope.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plant requires high humidity and bright light
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Plants are epiphytes and need a supporting substrate
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Dendrobium teretifolium as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Dendrobium teretifolium

 

#49Z1 :: Piper methysticum (Kava)

Piper methysticum, Kava, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Kava is a shrubby perennial species in the Piperaceae native to Vanuatu, Fiji, Samoa and Hawaii. It has been an important plant to South Pacific cultures for thousands of years. The plant has multiple branches arising from the base and cordate leaves. The fibrous rootstock is the source of the kava beverage, which has anxiolytic and anaesthetic properties. Many cultivars have been developed.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow kava in the east end of the middle tier of slope plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Kava is intolerant of frost
  • Plant requires partial shade
  • Kava requires steady moisture
  • Plant requires excellent drainage
  • All kava is reproduced from cuttings
  • Kava is a sterile anthropogenic species
  • In Vanuatu, kava is grown in hollow trees for ease of harvest
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive kava as rooted cuttings. The rooted cutting should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting in their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Kava

 

#50Z1 :: Solanum divaricata (Forest tree tomato)

Solanum divaricata, Forest tree tomato, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The forest tree tomato is a shrub to 10 feet in the Solanaceae native to forest understory in central South America. It was formerly called Cyphomandra divaricata, but the genus Cyphomandra has recently been subsumed into genus Solanum, and the species renamed. The plant bears oblong green edible fruit. It is not widely known outside its native area, but has been recommended for commercialization.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow forest tree tomatoes on the west end of the lower tier of the slope planting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are most productive with frequent light feedings
  • Forest tree tomatoes need a constantly moist root zone
  • The plants are grown like their close relative the tomato
  • Like tomatoes, plants are susceptible to a range of insect pests
  • Superior clones are propagated from cuttings which root easily
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive forest tree tomatoes as seed. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Bananas raras – Solanum divaricata

 

#51Z1 :: Eustrephus latifolius (Wombat berry)

Eustrephus latifolius, Wombat berry, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Eustrephus is a monotypic genus variously placed in the Luzuriagaceae, Philesiaceae or Asparagaceae family. It is a small twining vine growing in the cool tropical and subtropical coastal rainforests of eastern Australia. The wiry vines can climb to 15 feet and bear pendant white flowers with exserted stamens. These are followed by edible orange fruits. The sweet juicy 1.5” tubers are also eaten.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow wombat berry on a trellis on the west side of the lower tier of the slope plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants like at least partial shade
  • A rich amended free draining soil is best
  • Plants do best with support for the wiry vines
  • The species appears free of pests and diseases
  • Plant prefer steady moisture, but can survive drying
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive wombat berry as seed or small plants. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Eustrephus

 

#52Z1 :: Vanda tessellata

Vanda tessellata, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Vanda tessellata is a species of epiphytic orchid native to India. The leaves are succulent 6-8 inches long, recurved. The flowers are in racemes of 6 -10. The root and leaves are an important ingredient in the traditional medicinal system of India. They are used to treat a wide range of internal and external conditions. Science has found compounds including alkaloid, glucoside, tannins, sterols, fatty acids and resin.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Vanda epiphytically in the middle of the lower tier of planting slope.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Vanda tessellata requires high humidity
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • Plants are epiphytes and need a supporting substrate
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Vanda as small plants ot TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Vanda tessellata

 

#53Z1 :: Solanum diploclonos (Deer fruit)

Solanum diploclonos (Deer fruit), aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The deer fruit is a tender shrub to 10 feet in the Solanaceae, native to the Mata Atlantica region of southern Brazil. It was formerly called Cyphomandra fragrans, but the genus Cyphomandra has recently been subsumed into genus Solanum, and the species renamed. This plant produces a thin skinned edible fruit (yellow when ripe) of agreeable flavor. It is not much known outside its native region.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow deer fruit in the middle of the lower tier of the slope plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Deer fruit plants need a constantly moist root zone
  • Plants are most productive with frequent light feedings
  • The plants are grown like their close relative the tomato
  • Superior clones are propagated from cuttings which root easily
  • Similar to tomatoes, plants are susceptible to a range of insect pests
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive deer fruit as seed. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Bananas raras – Solanum diploclonos

 

#54Z1 :: Dendrobium loddigesii

Dendrobium loddigesii, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

This is a terrestrial, lithophilic or epiphytic orchid native to mountainous regions of S. E Asia. It is sympodial, or clump-forming and left alone will increase in size over time. The species has been an important ingredient in Traditional Chinese Medicine for thousands of years called “shi hu”. The plant is rich in compounds called phenanthrenes and is shown to stimulate the immune system, suppress tumors, lower blood pressure, etc.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Dendrobium loddigesii epiphytically in the middle of the lower tier of the planting slope.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plant requires high humidity and bright light
  • Plants should be allowed to dry out when dormant
  • If grown as an epiphyte it needs supporting substrate
  • Propagation is difficult, but dormant division is possible
  • Plants benefit from abundant moisture and feeding when in growth
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Dendrobium loddigesii as small plants or TC flasks. If received as plants, they can be placed in their permanent location. If received as TC flasks, they must be de-flasked, and carefully established in a controlled environment before placement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Dendrobium loddigesii

 

#55Z1 :: Solanum quitoense (Naranjilla)

Solanum quitoense, Naranjilla, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Solanum quitoense is a bushy shrub to eight feet in the Solanaceae native to the high elevation Andean forests. The leaves and stems are covered in an indument of purple hairs and the plants bear large numbers of 2-3” diameter round orange fruits containing green pulp. The juice makes a popular beverage. Naranjilla are highly productive, and are grown commercially on small farms especially in Ecuador.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow naranjilla on the east end of the lower tier of the slope plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants need a constantly moist root zone
  • The plants are grown like their close relative the tomato
  • Naranjilla are most productive with frequent light feedings
  • Superior clones are propagated from cuttings which root easily
  • Similar to tomatoes, plants are susceptible to a range of insect pests
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive naranjilla as seeds or rooted cuttings. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Solanum quitoense

 

#56Z1 :: Rhodochiton atrosanguineum (Purple Bell Vine)

Rhodochiton atrosanguineum, Purple Bell Vine, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Purple Bell Vine is a vining perennial to 10 feet in the Plantaginaceae, native to the pine-oak cloud forests in Oaxaca, Mexico. It has been a favorite flower in Mexico since the Aztec civilization. The plant was sent to Europe in the 1830’s and has been popular specimen in many greenhouse collections and botanical gardens there. Although it is native to a narrow range, it’s popularity has kept the species from being threatened.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Rhodochiton on a trellis against the east wall of the lower tier of the slope planting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants like regular watering
  • The plants are intolerant of frost
  • Plants like partial shade to full sun
  • Rhodochiton responds well to frequent light feeding
  • The pendant flowers are mainly hummingbird pollinated
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive purple bell vine as small plants. If received as seed they should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on until they reach 1 gal. size, then planted in their permanent location. Small plants received should also be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Rhodochiton

 

WATER PLANTINGS

#57 & #58Z1 :: Nelumbo sp. (Lotus Root)

Nelumbo sp., Lotus Root, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Nelumbo, also known as “The Sacred Lotus,” is a small genus of two aquatic plants, N. nucifera and N. lutea, native to Asia and America respectively. The average plant grows to a height of 150 cm and a horizontal spread up to 3 meters. The entire plant is harvested in late summer when the seeds have matured and the flowers, seeds (cooked), leaves, and rhizomes of the lotus are all edible.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Nelumbo in the west bay and the Zenapini Pond.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants like standing or slow moving water
  • Depth of water affects production (3-4 feet seems best)
  • Seeds have a deep dormancy and are difficult to germinate
  • Plants are most commonly propagated from rhizome divisions
  • Young Nelumbo plants can be overfertilized which slows growth
  • Cook seeds to eliminate any risk of infection by the parasite Fasciolopsis buski
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Nelumbo as tubers or seed. If received as rhizomes, these can be potted and submerged or planted directly in mud of the pond. If received as seeds. the hard seed coat must be filed or cracked to allow water to enter. Once the seed is prepared, drop them in a clear plastic cup full of non-chlorinated water. The water may turn cloudy or dark and should be changed daily. A long thin sprout should emerge in 7-30 days. The sprouted seed can then be planted in the pond bottom or potted in heavy soil and submerged in the pond.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Nelumbo

 

#59Z1 :: Eleocharis dulcis (Water Chestnut)

Eleocharis, Water Chestnut, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Water chestnut is a sedge that grows in shallow water or the muddy soil along waterways. The stolons form nutritious tubers, rich in B-vitamins, with a sweet crisp texture. They have long been popular in Asian cuisine and have been extensively cultivated  for centuries. The tubers remain crisp after cooking due to the unusual cellular structure of cross-linked oligomers of ferulic acid.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow water chestnut  in the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are generally pest free
  • Plants are carefree once established
  • Tubers are harvested in the fall when the plants die down
  • The plants are propagated from crown divisions or from tubers
  • Plants should be grown in mud rich in organic matter for tuber production
  • Cook seeds to eliminate any risk of infection by the parasite Fasciolopsis buski
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as tubers. The tubers should be planted immediately in a heavy rich soil containing some clay in 6” pots and kept moist until growth begins. They can then be transplanted where they are to stand.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Eleocharis dulcis

 

#60Z1 :: Nymphaea (Blue Lotus)

Nymphaea, Blue Lotus, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Nymphaea are aquatic plants with plate-like leaves and vibrant flowers found in bodies of freshwater around the world. The young leaves, unopened flowers, seeds and tubers, are eaten and also have many medicinal uses as immune boosters, antioxidants, etc. The plants are highly ornamental and are common in water gardens. The hardy species can overwinter in the water as long as the temperature stays above freezing.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Nymphaea in the east bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • There are “crawlers” and “clumpers”
  • “Crawlers” spread faster, but flower less
  • “Clumpers” form a larger plant and flower more freely
  • Plants should be grown in 1-2’ of water to optimize blooming
  • The tropical species require water of 70F or above for growth
  • Soil should not be too rich, plants may rot or fail to bloom as much
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as tubers. Tubers can either be planted directly into the mud at the bottom of the pond where they are to grow, or potted up in a sand and clay mixture, and the pots slowly settled into the pond to avoid “floating” the tubers out of the pot. If using potted culture, it is best to initially submerge the pot only 6” to 1’ below the water until the first leaves reach the surface; then gradually sink the pot deeper until it is at 2’ or more.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Nymphaealue

 

 

DEEP WATER CULTURE PLANTS

The placements, cultural considerations, and planting guidelines are the same for all the deep water culture plantings. We will receive these plants as seed and will initially grow 2 or more rafts (see each of the plant #’s for specific raft amount) of each. They will be planted in 4×4 rafts floating on oxygenated water and fed by the aquaponics system. Aquaponic production begins with seedlings which are typically germinated in flats, then dibbled into individual cells and grown on until they have developed a sturdier root system. At this point they are placed into the aquaponic rafts, where they will grow until harvested. This system avoids the inefficiencies of direct-seeding into the rafts, and then having to re-seed those cells which may not germinate. The transplants provide uniform growth and maturity dates that twice-seeded rafts do not.

#63Z1 :: Coriandrum sativum (Cilantro)

Coriandrum sativum,Cilantro, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cilantro is an herbaceous annual plant in the Umbelliferae, thought to be native to the eastern Mediterranean.  It is used as a fresh herb almost exclusively, as the flavor is lost upon drying. It’s unique fresh flavor is an indispensable ingredient in the cuisines of Asia and Latin America. If allowed to go to seed, it produces the spice coriander, which has an entirely different flavor. Studies show cilantro has many medicinal benefits.

 

#64Z1 :: Ocimum sp. (Basil)

Ocimum sp.,Basil, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Like mints, basils are another group of herbaceous perennials in the Mint family. Also like the mints, their aromas and flavors are due to essential oils. However, the chemical makeup of the basils is very different from the mints, resulting in completely different flavors and aromas. Basils are generally tolerant of drier conditions than many mints. The leaves are used in many types of cuisine; many species are also used medicinally.

 

#65Z1 :: Brassica oleracea (Cabbage)

aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cabbage is a leafy green vegetable closely related to broccoli, cauliflower, and brussels sprouts. Cabbage heads generally range from 1-8 lbs and can be red and purple, green, and white. This hardy vegetable is high in vitamin K and C, folate, and is a good source of fiber as well.  It is used to make cole slaw, sauerkraut, and as a healthy addition to soups and salads.

 

#66Z1 :: Brassica oleracea (Broccoli)

Brassica oleracea, Broccoli, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Broccoli, a highly nutrient-rich vegetable, has large (typically green) flower heads arranged in a tree-like fashion on branches sprouting from a thick, edible stalk. It is high in vitamin C, as well as dietary fiber and also contains multiple nutrients with potent anti-cancer properties. Broccoli is usually boiled or steamed, but may be eaten raw also. It is commonly used in salads, soups, stir fry, and casseroles.

 

#67Z1 :: Brassica oleracea (Cauliflower)

Brassica oleracea, Cauliflower, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cauliflower is a nutritionally dense, cruciferous vegetable high in fiber, Vitamin C and B6. It may be eaten cooked, raw or pickled. It is most often served as a dipping vegetable, in soups, casseroles, or with creamy sauces. Typically only the head (the white curd) is eaten and, while white is the most common, cauliflower also comes in orange, green, and purple for added culinary variety.

 

#68Z1 :: Brassica oleracea  (Kale)

Brassica oleracea, Acephala Group, Kale, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The kales are another variant of cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower. As a group the kales are considered botanically to be closer to the wild form of the species. They tend to be both higher in fiber than other brassicas, and also higher in nutrients. In fact, kales are considered to be the most nutritious of all greens. Due to the higher fiber content, most kale is eaten after cooking to aid digestibility.

 

#69Z1 :: Lactuca sativa (Lettuce)

 Lactuca sativa, Lettuc, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Lettuce is a leafy herbaceous annual in the Asteraceae that has been cultivated for thousands of years. It has been bred into a wide variety of leaf shapes, textures and colors. The bitter flavor of its wild ancestors has largely been bred out of modern lettuces. Also missing is the milky latex that gave the genus it’s name (Lactuca derives from the Latin ‘lac’ or milk). Modern forms are mild-flavored and tender.

 

#70Z1 :: Apium graveolens (Celery)

Apium graveolens, Celery, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Celery is a succulent-stemmed biennial in the Umbelliferae native to Eurasia. It has long been cultivated in Europe; our word celery derives from the ancient Greek selinon. It is mainly grown for it’s succulent stalks and leaves, but tuberous rooted-forms are also known. The flavor of celery survives cooking, making it a popular vegetable for soups and stews. Seeds are used as a spice.

 

#71Z1 :: Nasturtium officinale (Watercress)

Nasturtium officinale, Watercress, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Watercress is an aquatic or semiaquatic plant in the Brassicaceae native to the marshes of Eurasia. As a member of Brassicaceae, is is related to mustard and radish, which share its spicy flavor. Watercress has hollow stems, which give it buoyancy in water, and compound pinnate leaves. Leaves are eaten fresh and the seeds are eaten spouted. The plant is highly nutritious, and has medicinal uses.

 

#72Z1 :: Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla (Chard)

Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla, Chard, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Chard is a leafy green vegetable in the Chenopodiaceae, and is conspecific with beets (it is a non-tuberous beet). The tender young greens are eaten fresh; older leaves and stalks are cooked, which reduces their bitterness. Leaves and stems are highly nutritious, especially in vitamins A & K. Many varieties have pigmented stalks. Plants produce new stalks and leaves throughout the season.

 

#73Z1 :: Capsicum  (Peppers)

Capsicum, peppers, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodCapsicum is a genus of 38 species in the Solanaceae, native to warm regions of the Americas. Their fruits are called “peppers” although they are not closely related to the true pepper of the Piperaceae. Capsicum fruits are rich in carotenoids, vitamins, and capsaicin, which gives them their hot spicy flavor. Plants are short-lived perennials usually grown as annuals. Thousands of varieties are known, ranging widely in their degree of heat.

 

ZENAPINI 1 PURCHASING DETAILS

The following is a list of the retail purchasing price of all the plants that will be planted in Zenapini #1. We are currently seeking companies that would like to partner with our 501(c)3 non-profit organization as specific providers of these plants to make duplication by the consumer easier. Visit our Win-Win-Win-Win page to understand our partnering philosophy and our Marketing and Promotional Engine Page for the specifics of how we can support those interested being a part of world change with One Community. These prices are rounded up to the nearest dollar and current as of September 2013.

NUMBER NAME PURCHASED FROM RECEIVED AS PRICE EA QTY TOTAL
#1Z1 Chiranthodendron botanicalpartners.com Plant $20 1 $20
#2Z1 Chucte fruitlovers.com Scion $15 1 $15
#3Z1 Chucte ucavo.ucr.edu Scion $15 1 $15
#4Z1 Chucte ucavo.ucr.edu Scion $15 1 $15
#5Z1 Chucte ucavo.ucr.edu Scion $15 1 $15
#6Z1 Houttuynia richters.com Plant $15 1 $15
#7Z1 Limnophila richters.com Plant $32 1 $32
#8Z1 Centella richters.com Plant $25 1 $25
#9Z1 Saururus lochnesswatergardens.com Plant $14 1 $14
#10Z1 Deppea gondwanalandtradingcompany.com Plant $25 1 $25
#11Z1 Saurauia gondwanalandtradingcompany.com Plant $35 1 $35
#12Z1 Polylepis sacredsucculents.com Plant $15 1 $15
#12bZ1 Cavendishia atlantabotanicalgarden.org Plant Index Seminum 1 $25
#13Z2 Pringle’s sapote riversendnursery.com Plant $35 2 $70
#14Z1 Montanoa kartuz.com Plant $10 4 $40
#15Z1 Bocconia georgiavines.com Seed $3 2 $6
#16Z1 Methysticodendron sacredsucculents.com Plant $27 1 $27
#17Z1 Dendroseris sacredsucculents.com Plant $29 1 $29
#18Z1 Scalesia jatunsacha.org Seed $25 1 $25
#18bZ1 Agapetes sacredsucculents.com Plant $9 3 $27
#19Z1 Satyrium lab.troymeyers.com Flask $40 1 $40
#20Z1 Disa lab.troymeyers.com Flask $40 1 $40
#21Z1 Hesperomeles sacredsucculents.com Plant $25 1 $25
#22Z1 Bletilla plantdelights.com Plant $15 3 $45
#23Z1 Macleania sacredsucculents.com Plant $18 4 $72
#24Z1 Jumellea carternadholmes.com Plant $12 3 $36
#25Z1 Cherimoya louiesnursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#26Z1 Dendrobium nobile www.smith.edu/garden Plant $4 4 $16
#27Z1 Goodyera gardensoftheblueridge.com Plant $6 4 $24
#28Z1 Leptotes jlorchids.com Plant $20 5 $100
#29Z1 Haloragis sacredsucculents.com Plant $16 1 $16
#30Z1 Tridactyle ebay.co.uk Seed $5 1 $5
#31Z1 Fuchsia claylane-fuchsias.co.uk Plant $40 6 $240
#32Z1 Gunnera capitalwholesalenursery.com Plant $35 3 $105
#33Z1 Lapageria sacredsucculents.com Plant $12 1 $12
#34Z1 Anoectochilus jlorchids.com Plant $20 2 $40
#35Z1 SC goosefoot sacredsucculents.com Seed $6 1 $6
#36Z1 Desfontainia sacredsucculents.com Plant $15 1 $15
#37Z1 Oncidium klehmgrowers.com Plant $10 4 $40
#38Z1 Podachaenium kartuz.com Plant $10 1 $10
#39Z1 Bomarea sacredsucculents.com Plant $18 2 $36
#40Z1 Eulophia gondwanalandtradingcompany.com Plant $35 1 $35
#41Z1 Habenaria andysorchids.com Plant $35 3 $105
#42Z1 Naranjilha colecionandofrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#43Z1 Pepino dulce rareseeds.com Seed $3 1 $3
#44Z1 Selenipedium ecuagenera.com Flask $35 3 $105
#45Z1 Epipactis laspilitas.com Plant $10 5 $50
#46Z1 Jua-acu colecionandofrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#47Z1 Jito colecionandofrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#48Z1 Dendrobium teretifolium marniturkel.com Flask $50 1 $50
#49Z1 Kava ktbotanicals.com Plant $29 1 $29
#50Z1 Forest tree tomato colecionandofrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#51Z1 Eustrephus kartuz.com Plant $11 1 $11
#52Z1 Vanda andysorchids.com Plant $30 2 $60
#53Z1 Deer fruit colecionandofrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#54Z1 Dendrobium loddigesii www.smith.edu/garden Plant $4 4 $16
#55Z1 Naranjilla logees.com Plant $13 2 $26
#56Z1 Rhodochiton anniesannuals.com Plant $10 1 $10
#57Z1-58Z1 Nelumbo waterfordgardens.com Plant $40 3 $120
#59Z1 Elaeocharis massspectrumbotanicals.com Tubers $1 100 $100
#60Z1 Nymphaea waterfordgardens.com Plant $40 3 $120
#61Z1 Bomarea sacredsucculents.com Plant $9 1 $9
#62Z1 Bomarea sacredsucculents.com Plant $9 1 $9
#63Z1 Cilantro seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#64Z1 Basil seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#65Z1 Cabbage seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#66Z1 Broccoli seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#67Z1 Cauliflower seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#68Z1 Kale seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#69Z1 Lettuces seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#70Z1 Celery seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#71Z1 Watercress seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#72Z1 Chard seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#73Z1 Peppers seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
  TOTAL $2681
  PLUS 20%* $536
  GRAND TOTAL $3217

20% is built in for taxes, shipping, and any other unexpected charges or fees.

ZENAPINI 2

TOTAL GROWING AREA FOR THIS STRUCTURE: 1,454 sq ft/135.1 sq m
walipini, aquapini, aquaponics, food diversity, Highest Good food, open source food, One Community, for The Highest Good of All, sustainable food, eco-food, biodiversity, open source botanical garden, Tropical Forest

Zenapini 2 Planting Map – Click to Enlarge

OVERVIEW

HARVEST   ●   TREES   ●   S, M, & G   ●   WATER   ●   MEDIA BEDS   ●   CORNER   ●   DWC   ●   COST

Zenapini #2 will be planted as a “tropical moist house” hosting a highly diverse range of tropical plants. It will be maintained between 60-90 degrees F (16-32 degrees celcius) and with 50-90% humidity. Food diversity is being prioritized over food production for this house and it will also host a variety of non-edible rare and useful plants. This structure will be an important component of One Community’s educational infrastructure where people can gain direct experience with some of nature’s plant wonders. In addition to housing a portion of the One Community botanical collection of useful and beautiful plants, Zenapini #2 will also function as an important component of One Community’s educational infrastructure and aesthetically pleasing environment in which to relax and enjoy the atmosphere.

5-YEAR FOOD PRODUCTION PROJECTION AVERAGES

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE COMPLETE SPREADSHEET

FOOD YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR 4 YEAR 5
Veg 763 lbs 800 lbs 821 lbs 823 lbs 827 lbs
Other 153 lbs 204 lbs 235 lbs 252 lbs 278 lbs
AquaC 1,010 lbs 1,010 lbs 1,010 lbs 1,010 lbs 1,010 lbs
TOTAL 1,926 lbs 2,014 lbs 2,066 lbs 2,085 lbs 2,115 lbs

 

 COMPLETE INDIVIDUAL PLANT DETAILS

NOTE: Latin names are used first because they are universally accepted, with common names following in parenthesis. The index or reference number preceding each plant name is cross referenced to the planting cost analysis price list (coming soon) as well as the planting layout map above. The planting plan is not a firm declaration and may need to be modified as we continue to source plant material and/or on site (with ongoing updates here) after all plants are preliminarily sited. Every tree is listed but, due to the quantities of plants, not every individual plant is listed on the planting layout map.

Here’s the link to the Pre-edit GoogleDoc

OVERSTORY TREES

#1Z2 – #5Z2 :: Inga sp. (Ice Cream Bean)

Inga sp., Ice Cream Bean, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Inga is a genus of approximately 300 species in the Leguminosae native to the moist regions of the Neotropics. They are medium to large forest trees with compound leaves with winged rachis. Flowers are in axillary spikes, with prominent exerted stamens arising from a long tubular corolla. Fruits are legumes up to 3 feet long with longitudinal ribs. Inside a moist fleshy edible aril surrounds the seeds.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Inga sp. at the east end of the lower tier of the planting slope.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees grow rapidly in full sun
  • Trees form mycorrhizal (VAM) root colonies
  • Tree fix large amounts of nitrogen in the soil
  • Seeds are recalcitrant and must be planted immediately
  • Trees have extrafloral nectaries on the leaves which attract pollinators
  • Many Inga species are endangered by habitat loss; conservation is essential
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Inga sp. as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Inga

 

#6Z2 :: Duguetia lanceolata (Pindaiba)

Duguetia lanceolata, Pindaiba, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Duguetia lanceolata is one of 90 species in a genus of small trees in the Annonaceae native to the tropics. The evergreen tree reaches 50 feet in habitat with a straight trunk and green corky bark. Leaves are simple with pointed apex, and have a characteristic fragrance when crushed. Flowers are green, 3-sepaled, with 5 pink petals. The fruit is 3-5 inches in diameter, with fleshy white aril surrounding the dark brown seeds.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow pindaiba north of the culture pond and west of the east bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Feed lightly if at all the first two years
  • Plants are slow for the first two years
  • Seed shoulds be planted immediately
  • May benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Seed germination can be erratic and slow
  • Older trees can benefit from annual fertilizer
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive pindaiba as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Duguetia

 

#7Z2 :: Rollinia mucosa (Biriba)

Rollinia mucosa Biriba, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Rollinia mucosa is a tree in the Annonaceae native to Latin America. The genus Rollinia has recently been placed in Annona, but taxonomists are not all in agreement. The species is an evergreen or briefly deciduous tree to 30 feet. The greenish yellow flowers have 3 sepals and 3 petals, and are followed by the large fruit with tuberculate skin and creamy white pulp. Leaves and bark are also used medicinally.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Rollinia north of the culture pond between the east and center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees need regular water
  • Grafted trees come into bearing earlier
  • Trees can benefit from hand pollination
  • Trees should be inoculated with mycorrhizae
  • Fertilizer requirements include micronutrients
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Biriba as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. Plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Rollinia

 

#8Z2 :: Cola acuminata (Cola nut)

Cola acuminata, Cola nut, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cola acuminata is one of approximately 125 species of Cola in the Sterculiaceae, native to Africa. It is an evergreen tree to 30-50 feet, with shiny green leaves and showy five-petaled flowers. These are followed by the wrinkled, leathery green pod containing usually one to many seeds. The are the “cola nuts” and are an important article to people throughout central Africa. They are chewed or made into teas or extracts.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Cola north of the culture pond east of the center bay

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Cola does best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees need mulch or weeding to suppress weeds
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive cola nut as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Kola

#9Z2 :: Pouteria viridis (Green sapote)

Pouteria viridis, Green sapote, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Pouteria viridis is a medium tree to 50 feet in the Sapotaceae native to Central America. The leathery green leaves are borne at the ends of the branches. Flowers in fascicles, white to pink, followed by the 5-8 inch fruit with green to yellow skin, orange to red juicy flesh, and one or two large seeds. The fruit are consumed throughout its native range; the seeds are also eaten roasted, and the latex used medicinally.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow green sapote west of the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Trees can be killed below 28F
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive green sapote as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Viridis

 

#10Z2 :: Protium heptaphyllum (Incense Tree)

Protium heptaphyllum, Incense Tree, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Protium heptaphyllum is one of 140 species in the Burseraceae, found mainly in the Neotropics, but also the Indo-Pacific region. It is a species to 50 feet with evergreen foliage and multiple flowers at the tips of branches. These are followed by the red fruits, which split open to reveal a thin layer of edible flesh surrounding the seed. Seeds produce a fragrant oil, the flesh is eaten, and the tree is tapped for its resin.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Protium north of the culture pond and east of the west bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive incense tree as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Protium

 

#11Z2 :: Theobroma cacao (Chocolate)

Theobroma cacao, Chocolate, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cacao is one of about 20 species of Theobroma, a genus in the Sterculiaceae native to Central and South America. The tree is 25 feet, leaves alternate, evergreen, flowers small, cauliflorous followed by 6-8” long ribbed fruit ripening yellow to red. Inside are 30-50 seeds embedded in white pulp. Seeds, rich in fats, are carefully fermented, during which enzymatic reactions develop the chocolate of commerce.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow cacao north of the culture pond east of the west bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • Trees do best with partial shade
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Theobroma cacao as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Theobroma

 

#12Z2 :: Maytenus laevis (Chuchuhuasi)

 Maytenus laevis, Chuchuhuasi, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Maytenus laevis is one of the sources of the popular South American herbal remedy “chuchuhuasi”. It is one of approximately 110 species found worldwide, mostly in the tropics. It is a tall forest tree reaching 80 feet with evergreen leaves. The extremely hard, dense bark is harvested throughout its range, used as a panacea and aphrodisiac. The tree is endangered by over collection and habitat loss.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow chuchuhuasi north of the culture pond between the west and central bays.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive chuchuhuasi as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Maytenus

 

#13Z2 :: Mitragyna sp.

Mitragyna, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Mitragyna is a genus of 10 species of evergreen trees in the Rubiaceae, native to Africa and Asia. All species are rich in indole alkaloids with a wide range of medicinal properties. Even within species, there appears to be chemically distinct races. They are forest trees and herbalists harvest from wild stands. Their populations are vulnerable to over harvesting and deforestation.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Mitragyna at the west end of the lower tier of the planting slope.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Mitragyna as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Mitragyna

 

#14Z2 :: Pausynistalia johimbe (Yohimbe)

Pausynistalia johimbe, Yohimbe, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Yohimbe is an evergreen forest tree in the Rubiaceae native to West Africa. The tree grows slowly to a height of 80 feet, and is usually unbranched for most of its height. The bark is the source of the alkaloid yohimbine, which is traded internationally as a treatment for erectile dysfunction. The tree is cut down to harvest the bark; it has become critically endangered, and is recommended for cultivation.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow yohimbe in the middle of the lower tier of the planting slope.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive yohimbe as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Yohimbe

 

#15Z2 :: Croton lechleri (Dragons Blood)

Croton lechleri, Dragons Blood, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Croton lechleri is an evergreen tree in the Euphorbiaceae native to the rainforests of Peru. It is a pioneer of light gaps, growing rapidly, whenever light reaches the forest floor. The blood red sap of older trees is an important medicine throughout the region, and has been extensively studied by pharmaceutical scientists. The trees rapid growth makes it a good candidate for carbon sequestration.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Croton lechleri on the east of the lower tier of slope plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Croton lechleri as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Lechleri

 

#16Z2 :: Virola sp.

Virola, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Virola is a genus of approximately 65 species of evergreen trees in the Myristicaceae, native to the rainforests of South America. The trees can reach heights of 40 feet in forested areas or less in savannah areas. All parts of the plant are used by indigenous people; the resins of some species are used as an entheogen, or to treat fungal infections, the leaves are fragrant and the seeds and arils are used like nutmeg.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Virola at the east end of the middle tier of the planting slope.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Virola as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Virola

 

#17Z2 :: Quararibea funebris (Cacahuaxochitl)

Quararibea funebris, Cacahuaxochitl, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Quararibea funebris is one of 85 species of the genus in the Bombacaceae; it is native to the highlands of southern Mexico and Guatemala. It is an evergreen tree to 30 feet with glossy leaves to 10” and showy white flowers. These have been used as a spice to flavor the indigenous chocolate drink, having an aroma like maple syrup and fenugreek. The plant also has medicinal uses.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow cacahuaxochitl just east of the east bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive cacahuaxochitl as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Quararibea funebris

 

SLOPE, MIDDLESTORY, AND GROUND PLANTINGS

 

#18Z2 :: Pilocarpus sp. (Jaborandi)

Pilocarpus, Jaborandi, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Pilocarpus is a genus of 13 species of woody perennial evergreen shrubs in the Rutaceae, native to Latin America. They are the source of the drug “jaborandi” which has been used by indigenous healers to increase secretory functions. This has been found to be due to an alkaloid, pilocarpine, which is now commercially marketed by pharmaceutical companies to treat conditions such as glaucoma and xerostomia.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Pilocarpus south of the pond maintenance ramp.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are probably bee pollinated
  • Plants grow best with regular watering
  • The plants grow in part shade to full sun
  • Information unavailable on nutrition; treat as citrus
  • The essential oils in the plant should repel most insects
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive jaborandi as seed. Seed should be sown immediately. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Pilocarpus

 

#19Z2 :: Citronella gongonha (Congonha)

Citronella gongonha, Congonha, uapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Congonha is a one of 22 species of Citronella in the Icacinaceae or Cardiopteridaceae, native to Latin America. It is an evergreen shrub with alternate petiolate leaves, and small cream to brown flowers, followed by purple drupes. The species is native to the Mata Atlantica region of Brazil, where it is made into a popular tea similar to mate (Ilex paraguariensis). The plant has many medicinal uses attributed to it.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow congonha in the northeast corner of the floor plantings next to the pond access ramp.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive congonha as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Hortipedia – Citronella gongonha

 

#20Z2 :: Psychotria viridis (Chacruna)

Psychotria viridis, Chacruna, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Psychotria viridis is one of 1900 species in the Rubiaceae, native to the warm tropical regions of the world. They are evergreen shrubs and trees occurring in rainforests or forest clearings, with small white flowers and white, red or purple berries. The genus is widely used medicinally and particularly rich in alkaloids. The alkaloids include antibacterial, antiviral, emetic, analgesic, anxiolytic and entheogenic activities.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow chacruna south of Inga #4.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive chacruna as a small plant. The small plant should be grown on until is has reaches 1 gal size before planting in its permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia — Psychotria

 

#21Z2 :: Erythroxylum deciduum (Toucan fruit)

Erythroxylum deciduum, Toucan fruit, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Erythroxylum deciduum is one of 200 species in the Erythroxylaceae, found mostly in the Neotropics. E. deciduum is found in eastern Brazil in remnants of the Atlantic rainforest. It is a shrub to 10 feet, with white flowers followed by abundant edible berries. These are an important food source for many species of birds, and the species has been recommended in reforestation plans. The plant has medicinal uses.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Erythroxylum deciduum north of the culture pond to the north of the green sapote.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive toucan fruit as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Bananasraras – Erythroxylum deciduum

 

#22Z2 :: Cymbopetalum penduliflorum (Xochinacaztli)

Cymbopetalum penduliflorum, Xochinacaztli, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cymbopetalum penduliflorum is one of a genus of 30 species in the Annonaceae, native to the highlands of southern Mexico and Guatemala. It is an evergreen shrub with alternate lanceolate leaves and solitary cup shaped fragrant flowers. These flowers were highly prized by pre-Conquest people, used as an admixture to tobacco, and added to the chocolate drink. They are reported to have medicinal properties.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Cymbopetalum north of the central path, south of Inga #3.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive xochinacaztli as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Hortipedia – Cymbopetalum penduliflorum

 

#23Z2 :: Maytenus officinalis (Espinheira Santa)

Maytenus officinalis, Espinheira Santa, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Espinheira Santa is a shrub to 10 feet in the Celastraceae, native to central South America. The plant is evergreen with shiny leathery leaves holly-like spines on the margins; it was originally placed in Ilex. The orange yellow flowers are followed by a dry capsule, containing the seeds. The entire plant has a long history of medicinal use in Brazil for a wide range of conditions. Research has identified many active compounds.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow espinheira santa in the lower tier of the slope planting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Maytenus officinalis as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Maytenus

 

#24Z2 :: Gnetum gnemon (Melinjo)

Gnetum gnemon, Melinjo, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Gnetum is a genus of 30-35 species of ancient gymnosperms, the sole genus in the Gnetaceae and the Order Gnetales. Melinjo is native to S.E. Asia, where it is widely cultivated for the edible leaves, used in soups and curries; the edible seeds are commonly pounded flat and fried into crackers, called emping. The plant is also medicinal and compounds can act as a food preservative and flavor enhancer.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow melinjo south of the west end of the wick beds.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive melinjo as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Gnetum gnemon

 

#25Z2 :: Tabernanthe iboga

Tabernanthe iboga, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Iboga is one of two species of Tabernanthe in the Apocynaceae, native to tropical West Africa. The plant is an evergreen or drought deciduous shrub, with simple leaves and cymes of pendant golden flowers, followed by orange pointed fleshy fruits. The roots of the plant are the plant drug iboga, sacred to the Bwiti cult of ancestor worship. It contains the alkaloid ibogaine, which has unique actions on the CNS.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow iboga at the east end of the lower tier of the planting slope.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive iboga as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Tabernanthe iboga

 

#26Z2 :: Euphorbia lancifolia (Ixbut)

Euphorbia lancifolia, Ixbut, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Euphorbia lancifolia is a vining or scrambling plant in the Euphorbiaceae native to shady forested areas of Guatemala. The plant has 2-4” leaves narrowing to a pointed tip, usually with white markings. The stems are jointed, scrambling,scandent and root at the nodes as they run across the soil. All parts yield a white latex when injured. The plant has been used in Mayan ethnomedicine as a galactogogue.

PLACEMENTS

We will plant ixbut west of the path at the top of the pond access ramp.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • A rich humusy soil is best
  • Plants need good drainage
  • The plants will not tolerate frost
  • Prolonged drought can kill the plant
  • The plants prefer at least some shade
  • Dry spells cause the plant to die back to the roots
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive ixbut as rooted cuttings. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia -Euphorbia lancifolia

 

#27Z2 :: Heteropterys sp.

Heteropterys, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Heteropterys comprises over 140 species of scrambling shrubs or lianas in the Malpighiaceae family, native to the Neotropics. They have opposite leaves (rarely alternate), inflorescences in racemes or panicles; axillary, terminal or both. The samara structure is distinct for the genus. Many species have been used in traditional medicine for nervous complaints bone and tendon weakness.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Heteropterys south of Inga #2.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Plants do best with regular watering
  • Plant may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Plants do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Heteropterys as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Heteropterys

 

#28Z2 :: Alicia sp.

aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Alicia is a genus of two species of woody vines in the Malpighiaceae, native to tropical South America. Leaves simple, petiole bearing 2-4(-8) small glands in 2 rows; inflorescences in terminal and lateral panicles; fruit a samara, suborbicular or transversely elliptical. Both species are used medicinally, and have been shown to contain MAO inhibitors as well as CNS-active indole alkaloids.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Alicia south of Inga #3.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Plant may grow better with a support
  • Plant may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Plants do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Alicia as seeds or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Alicia

 

#29Z2 :: Bauhinia guianensis (Escalera de Mono)

Bauhinia guianensis, Escalera de Mono, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Bauhinia guianensis is one of 200 species of Bauhinia in the Leguminosae, native to warm regions worldwide. It is a woody vine found in the rainforests of South America, where it clambers up to the canopy. It is known to produce two different wood structures; one when it begins to grow, and another once it grasps support and can begin to climb. The vine is used medicinally.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow escalera de mono just north of the culture pond south of Inga #4.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Plant may grow better with a support
  • Plant may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Plants do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive escalera de mono as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to a 1 gal. size before planting in their permanent location.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia -Bauhinia guianensis

 

#30Z2 :: Uncaria tomentosa (Una de Gato)

 Uncaria tomentosa, Una de Gato, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Uncaria tomentosa is a woody vine or scrambling shrub in the Rubiaceae native to the rainforests of South America. Leaves are simple, elliptic, in whorled opposite pairs. The stems are armed with stout spiraled thorns. The species is an important medicinal plant. used to treat inflammation, gastrointestinal conditions, boosting immune response,etc. Distinct chemovars are known with differing effects.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow una de gato south of the pond access ramp.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Plants do best with regular watering
  • Plants may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Plants do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive una de gato as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Uncaria tomentosa

 

#31Z2 :: Pffafia paniculata (Suma)

Pffafia paniculata, Suma, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Suma is a sprawling ground vine in the Amaranthaceae, native to Brazil. The species paniculata is the primary one used in herbal medicine, but others in the genus of 90 species are sometimes substituted for P. paniculata. The roots and rhizomes of the plant have been an important herbal medicine for centuries. The local name “para tudo” (for everything) indicates its esteem by local herbalists. Many active compounds are known.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow suma south of Inga #1.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive suma as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Suma

 

#32Z2 :: Martinella obovata

 Martinella obovata, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Martinella obovata is a scrambling vine in the Bignoniaceae, native to Latin America. It has wirey stems simple leaves in opposite pairs and tendrils that assist the plant in climbing. The flowers are in axillary racemes, purple with a white throat, showy. These are followed by a long thin flattened capsule 3-4’ in length, containing winged seeds. The plant is used medicinally throughout its range for eye problems.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Martinella at the top of the pond access ramp.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • They do best with regular watering
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Plants may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Plants will benefit from mulching to keep soil soft
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Martinella as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

NCBI – Martinella obovata

 

#33Z2 :: Piper regnellii (Pariparoba Mansa)

Piper regnellii, Pariparoba Mansa, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Herbaceous subshrub to 4 feet in the Piperaceae, native to Brazil. The plant has heart-shaped alternate leaves arising from pubescent, furrowed stems. Flowers in 3-6 in. spikes, arising in the leaf axils, pendant when mature. The flower fertilized spikes have a sweet spicy flavor, and are added to rice, bean and meat dishes or soups. Young leaves are also edible and are cooked as greens or added to desserts.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow pariparoba mansa south of Inga #1.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Plants do best with regular watering
  • Plants may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Plants do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive pariparoba as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Colecionandofrutas – Piper regnellii

 

#34Z2 :: Chamaedorea tepejilote (Pacaya)

 Chamaedorea tepejilote, Pacaya, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The pacaya palm is native to the understory of the Central American rainforest. It is one of about 110 species of Chamaedorea found in Central and South America. Pacaya has been an important tropical vegetable in this region since the time of the Mayans. Its unopened pale yellow flower bud is gathered and the spathe removed. It is eaten boiled or fried, and is a popular breakfast food in Honduras.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow pacaya scattered throughout the Zenapini 2 in any open space to fill in light wells.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Most palms benefit from magnesium supplementation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive pacaya as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Chamaedorea tepejilote

 

#36Z2 :: Vasconcellea spp.

Vasconcellea, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Vasconcellea is a genus of approximately 20 species of upright herbaceous shrubs in the Caricaceae, native to Latin America. They were formerly classed as species of Carica, but have been declared a distinct genus. Interspecific hybridization is known, as in V. x heilbornii, the babaco. Like the papaya, Vasconcellea produce edible fruits and are cultivated to a limited extent in their native regions.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Vasconcellea on the west half of the middle tier of the slope planting.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Plants do best with regular watering
  • Plants may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Plants do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Vasconcellea as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Vasconcellea

 

#36bZ2 :: Geophila repens (Pixi)

 Geophila repens, Pixi, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Geophila repens is one of about 30 species of Geophila in the Rubiaceae, native to warm tropical regions worldwide. The plant is an evergreen creeping perennial to 8” occurring in remnant patches of undisturbed rainforest of the Mata Atlantica region in Brazil. The white flowers are followed by the bright red edible berries each containing one or two seeds. The leaves are used medicinally.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow pixi as a ground cover south of Inga #2 and #3 beneath pacaya palms.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant requires shade
  • Plants benefit from periodic light fertilization
  • Plants are multiplied by cuttings which root easily
  • Plants require regular water and will wilt if stressed
  • Seeds are erratic germinators and may take 6 months
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive pixi as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Colecionandofrutas – Geophila repens

 

#37Z2 :: Justicia pectoralis var. stenophylla (Masha-Hiri)

Justicia pectoralis var. stenophylla, Masha-Hiri, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Masha-hiri is one of 420 species of Justicia in the Acanthaceae, native to tropical America. They are tender perennial shrubs or herbs, not withstanding temperatures below 45F. Justicia flowers may be white, yellow, orange, pink. or red. Masha-hiri is found in the Amazon region, where it is an important medicinal herb. It produces fragrant coumarins; its addition to the ayahuasca brew may be due to this.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow masha-hiri on the east end of the middle tier of the slope plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Plants do best with regular watering
  • Plants may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Plants do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive masha-hiri as seed or rooted cuttings. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Justicia pectoralis

 

#38Z2 :: Fittonia verschaffeltii (Mosaic Plant)

Fittonia verschaffeltii, Mosaic Plant,aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Fittonia is a genus of 15 species of herbaceous evergreen tropical plants from Ecuador, Peru and Brazil In the Acanthaceae. They are shade-loving forest floor plants 1 to 2 feet in height. The leaves have distinctive vein pattern, which is often a contrasting color to the rest of the leaf surface. The are grown in the U.S as popular houseplants. Recent fieldwork by Dr. Ethan Russo has shown the plants to be used medicinally.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Fittonia in the center of the middle tier of the slope plantings in the filtered shade of several pacaya palms.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants like frequent light feeding
  • Plants like part shade to filtered light
  • Fittonia likes a soil high in organic matter
  • Fittonia is intolerant of cold and frost is fatal
  • Plants can be increased by layers, cuttings or seeds
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive Fittonia as small plants. Plants should be grown on to 1 gal. size before permanent planting.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Fittonia

 

#39Z2 :: Paullinia cupana var. sorbilis (Guarana)

Paullinia cupana var. sorbilis, Guarana, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Guarana is one of 120 species of Paullinia in the Sapindaceae, native to tropical America. It is a woody liana in the rainforest. The bright red fruits split open to reveal the shiny black seed partially enclosed in a white edible aril. The seeds are toasted, ground and dried to make the guarana beverage. This has a high content of caffeine, as well as saponins and other bioactive compounds.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow guarana on a trellis along the western half of the retaining wall of the middle tier of the slope plants.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Trees do best with regular watering
  • Trees may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Trees do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive guarana as seed or small plants. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out. All plants will benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Guarana      Wikipedia – Paullinia

 

#40Z2 :: Melancium campestre (Cabacui)

Melancium campestre, Cabacui, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cabacui is a creeping biennial or perennial vine in the Cucurbitaceae, native to Brazil. The vines reach 5 feet in length and are covered in soft bristles, leaves cordate with serrated margins. Flowers cream to yellow arising above the leaves. Fruits green with darker green stripes, firm rind with yellow tart pulp. The genus Melancium is monotypic, and the species is considered threatened.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow cabacui on the west half of the upper tier of the slope plantings.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are intolerant of frost
  • The plant requires well drained soil
  • Plants do best with regular watering
  • Plants may benefit from mycorrhizal inoculation
  • Plants do best with regular light applications of compost
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive cabacui as seed. Seedlings should be grown on to 1 gal. size before planting out. Small plants should be grown on to 1 gal size before planting out.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Colecionandofrutas – Melancium campestre

 

WATER PLANTINGS

#41Z2 :: Nymphaea (Blue Lotus)

Nymphaea, Blue Lotus, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food,

Nymphaea are aquatic plants with plate-like leaves and vibrant flowers found in bodies of freshwater around the world. The young leaves, unopened flowers, seeds and tubers, are eaten and also have many medicinal uses as immune boosters, antioxidants, etc. The plants are highly ornamental and are common in water gardens. The hardy species can overwinter in the water as long as the temperature stays above freezing.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Nymphaea in the east bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • There are “crawlers” and “clumpers”
  • “Crawlers” spread faster, but flower less
  • “Clumpers” form a larger plant and flower more freely
  • Plants should be grown in 1-2’ of water to optimize blooming
  • The tropical species require water of 70F or above for growth
  • Soil should not be too rich, plants may rot or fail to bloom as much
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as tubers. Tubers can either be planted directly into the mud at the bottom of the pond where they are to grow, or potted up in a sand and clay mixture, and the pots slowly settled into the pond to avoid “floating” the tubers out of the pot. If using potted culture, it is best to initially submerge the pot only 6” to 1’ below the water until the first leaves reach the surface; then gradually sink the pot deeper until it is at 2’ or more.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Nymphaealue

#42Z2 :: Eleocharis dulcis (Water Chestnut)

Eleocharis, Water Chestnut, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Water chestnut is a sedge that grows in shallow water or the muddy soil along waterways. The stolons form nutritious tubers, rich in B-vitamins, with a sweet crisp texture. They have long been popular in Asian cuisine and have been extensively cultivated  for centuries. The tubers remain crisp after cooking due to the unusual cellular structure of cross-linked oligomers of ferulic acid.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow water chestnut in the center bay.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants are generally pest free
  • Plants are carefree once established
  • Tubers are harvested in the fall when the plants die down
  • The plants are propagated from crown divisions or from tubers
  • Plants should be grown in mud rich in organic matter for tuber production
  • Cook seeds to eliminate any risk of infection by the parasite Fasciolopsis buski
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as tubers. The tubers should be planted immediately in a heavy rich soil containing some clay in 6” pots and kept moist until growth begins. They can then be transplanted where they are to stand.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Water Chestnut

 

#43Z2 :: Nelumbo sp. (Lotus Root)

Nelumbo, Lotus Root, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Nelumbo, also known as “The Sacred Lotus,” is a small genus of two aquatic plants, N. nucifera and N. lutea, native to Asia and America respectively. The average plant grows to a height of 150 cm and a horizontal spread up to 3 meters. The entire plant is harvested in late summer when the seeds have matured and the flowers, seeds (cooked), leaves, and rhizomes of the lotus are all edible.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Nelumbo in the west bay and the Zenapini Pond.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants like standing or slow moving water
  • Depth of water affects production; 3-4 feet seems best
  • Seeds have a deep dormancy and are difficult to germinate
  • Plants are most commonly propagated from rhizome divisions
  • Young Nelumbo plants can be overfertilized, which slows growth
  • Cook seeds to eliminate any risk of infection by the parasite Fasciolopsis buski
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as tubers or seed. If received as rhizomes, these can be potted and submerged or planted directly in mud of the pond. If received as seeds the hard seedcoat must be filed or cracked to allow water to enter. Once the seeds are prepared, drop them in a clear plastic cup full of non-chlorinated water. The water may turn cloudy or dark and should be changed daily. A long thin sprout should emerge in 7-30 days. The sprouted seed can then be planted in the pond bottom or potted in heavy soil and submerged in the pond.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Lotus Root

 

#44Z2 :: Victoria regia (Amazon water lily)

 Victoria regia, Amazon water lily, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Victoria is a small genus of 2 or 3 species in the Nymphaeceae, native to slow moving rivers of the Amazon basin. They are the largest plant in the Nymphaeceae, with circular leaves that can reach nearly ten feet in diameter. Victoria regia was named Queen Victoria, but this name is unresolved and may belong in either of the other 2 accepted species.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Victoria in the triangle pond.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The flowers are pollinated by beetles
  • The flowers open the first day by attracting the beetles which enter the flowers near dusk
  • The flower then closes around the insect, sheltering it from predators as it pollinates the flower
  • The second day the flower opens, releasing the beetles, which can then fly to other blossoms nearby
  • Flowers are also at least partially self-fertile, so the plants can reproduce in the absence of the insects
PLANTING GUIDELINES

Planting is from seed, which must be kept moist at all times. Seeds should be nicked at the operculum (attachment scar) and placed in warm (85F-92F) water, usually a small aquarium, until germination. They can then be potted up individually, similar to Nymphaea, and submerged into the water where they will stand

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Victoria

 

MEDIA BEDS

#45Z2 :: Houttuynia cordata (Vap Ca)

Houttuynia cordata, Vap Ca, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Houttuynia cordata is a fast-growing, herbaceous perennial plant from S.E. Asia. It is a low, creeping, mat-forming herb that spreads by rhizomes. Both the leaves and the rhizomes are used in Asian cooking. They have a distinctive spicy flavor that goes well in a variety of dishes. The plant is also used medicinally to treat lung infections and also used as an antiviral, antibacterial, and a general detoxifier.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Houttuynia in the westernmost growing bed along the north wall where it will benefit from the shade of the fruit trees.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant prefers at least some shade, and will not withstand frost
  • Cultivation in the planting bed will assist in harvesting the thin rhizomes
  • Plants prefers abundant moisture, and can grow in standing water or wet soil
  • In areas of regular rainfall the plant has escaped cultivation and is considered weedy
  • We will keep Houttuynia in the planting bed until its weedy potential can be assessed
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Houttuynia cordata

 

#46Z2 :: Limnophila aromatica (Rau Om)

Limnophila, aromatica, Rau Om, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Limnophila aromatica is a tender, tropical, creeping herb in the Plantaginaceae native to S. E. Asia. It is used extensively in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand as an edible green. Rau Om is aquatic to amphibious, and will grow fully submerged, in standing water or moist soil. It’s flavor has been described as “a beguiling floral character” or “lemon zest and cumin”.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Rau Om in the next to westernmost bed along the north wall of Zenapini 2 where it will benefit from the shade of the adjacent trees.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Rau Om will grow in partial shade to full sun
  • Plants will not tolerate frost and have no invasive potential outside the tropics
  • The plant is cultivated in manured rice paddies, and can utilize high nitrogen loads
  • The plant will be kept in the Aquaponic system until its weediness can be determined
  • Related species of Limnophila are used fully submerged in aquaria as decorative plants
  • In areas with regular rainfall, the plant has escaped cultivation, and is considered weedy
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. They can be planted immediately where they are to grow, and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Limnophila aromatica

 

#47Z2 :: Centella asiatica (Gotu Kola)

Centella asiatica, Gotu Kola, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Gotu cola is a creeping tender perennial in the Umbelliferae, native to the Old World tropics and subtropics. It is highly valued in traditional Chinese medicine as a tonic. A few leaves eaten daily are said to improve mental clarity, increase vitality, and lengthen one’s life. The leaves are eaten or dried for tea. Science has found a number of beneficial effects, including antiviral and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Centella in the middle bed and next to easternmost bed along the north wall of  Zenapini 2 where it will benefit from the shade of the adjacent trees.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Gotu cola requires a frost-free climate
  • They grow best in soils of high fertility
  • Centella prefers partial shade to full sun
  • The plant is easily propagated by root divisions
  • They require steady moisture, and suffer with prolonged drought
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these plants as rooted cuttings. The rooted cutting can be planted directly in the wick beds and watered in well. Fertilizing should wait until signs of growth begin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Centella asiatica

 

#48Z2 :: Saururus cernuus (Lizards tail)

Saururus cernuus, Lizards tail, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Lizards tail is a creeping herbaceous perennial in the Saururaceae, native to eastern North America. The plant grows in shallow water or moist soil along the edges of ponds, streams, and marshes. The leaves are lanceolate with a cordate base; leaf petioles clasp the stem. Flowers occur opposite leaves, and are upright spikes with drooping tips. The whole plant is used medicinally.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow lizards tail in one of the wick beds along the north wall of Zenapini 1.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • The plant prefers partial shade to full sun
  • The plant is burned to the ground by frost
  • Lizards tail grows best in soils of high fertility
  • Saururus cernuus is easily propagated by root divisions
  • Plants require steady moisture, and suffers with prolonged drought
PLANTING GUIDELINES

We will receive these as rooted cuttings. The rooted cuttings can be planted in the wick bed immediately and watered in well.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Saururus cernuus

 

CORNER PLANTINGS

#49Z2 :: Griffonia simplicifolia (Kajya, Atooto)

Griffonia simplicifolia, Kajya, Atooto, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Griffonia simplicifolia is a woody vine or half-erect shrub to 10 feet in height belonging to the Fabaceae, native to tropical Africa. The plant is an important medicine in its native range, used for chewing sticks, the leaves for wound healing, as an anti-emetic, antibiotic and to control dysentery, and aphrodisiac. The seeds contain large amounts of 5-hydroxytryptophan, which is converted in the body to the neurotransmitter seratonin.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Griffonia on the north wall of the seating area next to the triangle pond.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Plants will grow in full sun to part shade
  • The plants are tropical and are intolerant of frost
  • Unknown if this species fixes nitrogen, but Rhizobium inoculation should be tried
PLANTING GUIDELINES

Plants should be at least 1 gal size before planting in their permanent location. If started from seed, care must be taken not to keep seed too moist or damping-of will occur. Seeds have short viability and should be planted immediately.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Griffonia simplicifolia

 

#50Z2 :: Banisteriopsis caapi (Caapi, Yage)

Banisteriopsis caapi, Caapi, Yage, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Banisteriopsis caapi is a large woody vine or liana in the Malpighiaceae, native to the Amazon rain forests. The woody parts of the stems have a grey-brown bark; leaves are opposite as the entire, upper surface is glabrous. Inflorescences in axillary or terminal cymose panicles. Flowers are pink with 10 stamens; fruit a samara. The entire plant contains beta-carboline alkaloids that act as MAO inhibitors.

PLACEMENTS

We will grow Banisteriopsis along the east wall of the seating area next to the triangle pond.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • Cappi are intolerant of frost
  • The vines grow in full sun to part shade
  • Vines form thickets in open areas of the forest
  • The vines can root where they come into contact with the soil
  • They are robust climbers and will grow up trees or other supports
  • Plants respond well to organic matter, fertilizer, and abundant moisture during warm weather
PLANTING GUIDELINES

Rooted cuttings should be 1 gal. size before planting out. Keep moist until new growth begins. Allow adequate space for the vines, and provide a support structure for them to climb.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Wikipedia – Banisteripsis caapi

 DEEP WATER CULTURE PLANTS

The placements, cultural considerations, and planting guidelines are the same for all the deep water culture plantings. We will receive these plants as seed and will initially grow 2 or more rafts (see each of the plant #’s for specific raft amount) of each. They will be planted in 4×4 rafts floating on oxygenated water and fed by the aquaponics system. Aquaponic production begins with seedlings which are typically germinated in flats, then dibbled into individual cells and grown on until they have developed a sturdier root system. At this point they are placed into the aquaponic rafts, where they will grow until harvested. This system avoids the inefficiencies of direct-seeding into the rafts, and then having to re-seed those cells which may not germinate. The transplants provide uniform growth and maturity dates that twice-seeded rafts do not.

#51Z2 :: Coriandrum sativum (Cilantro)

Coriandrum sativum,Cilantro, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cilantro is an herbaceous annual plant in the Umbelliferae, thought to be native to the eastern Mediterranean.  It is used as a fresh herb almost exclusively, as the flavor is lost upon drying. It’s unique fresh flavor is an indispensable ingredient in the cuisines of Asia and Latin America. If allowed to go to seed, it produces the spice coriander, which has an entirely different flavor. Studies show cilantro has many medicinal benefits.

 

#52Z2 :: Ocimum sp. (Basil)

Ocimum sp.,Basil, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Like mints, basils are another group of herbaceous perennials in the Mint family. Also like the mints, their aromas and flavors are due to essential oils. However, the chemical makeup of the basils is very different from the mints, resulting in completely different flavors and aromas. Basils are generally tolerant of drier conditions than many mints. The leaves are used in many types of cuisine; many species are also used medicinally.

 

#53Z2 :: Brassica oleracea (Cabbage)

aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cabbage is a leafy green vegetable closely related to broccoli, cauliflower, and brussels sprouts. Cabbage heads generally range from 1-8 lbs and can be red and purple, green, and white. This hardy vegetable is high in vitamin K and C, folate, and is a good source of fiber as well.  It is used to make cole slaw, sauerkraut, and as a healthy addition to soups and salads.

 

#54Z2 :: Brassica oleracea (Broccoli)

Brassica oleracea, Broccoli, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Broccoli, a highly nutrient-rich vegetable, has large (typically green) flower heads arranged in a tree-like fashion on branches sprouting from a thick, edible stalk. It is high in vitamin C, as well as dietary fiber and also contains multiple nutrients with potent anti-cancer properties. Broccoli is usually boiled or steamed, but may be eaten raw also. It is commonly used in salads, soups, stir fry, and casseroles.

 

#55Z2 :: Brassica oleracea (Cauliflower)

Brassica oleracea, Cauliflower, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Cauliflower is a nutritionally dense, cruciferous vegetable high in fiber, Vitamin C and B6. It may be eaten cooked, raw or pickled. It is most often served as a dipping vegetable, in soups, casseroles, or with creamy sauces. Typically only the head (the white curd) is eaten and, while white is the most common, cauliflower also comes in orange, green, and purple for added culinary variety.

 

#56Z2 :: Brassica oleracea  (Kale)

Brassica oleracea, Acephala Group, Kale, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

The kales are another variant of cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower. As a group the kales are considered botanically to be closer to the wild form of the species. They tend to be both higher in fiber than other brassicas, and also higher in nutrients. In fact, kales are considered to be the most nutritious of all greens. Due to the higher fiber content, most kale is eaten after cooking to aid digestibility.

 

#57Z2 :: Lactuca sativa (Lettuce)

 Lactuca sativa, Lettuc, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Lettuce is a leafy herbaceous annual in the Asteraceae that has been cultivated for thousands of years. It has been bred into a wide variety of leaf shapes, textures and colors. The bitter flavor of its wild ancestors has largely been bred out of modern lettuces. Also missing is the milky latex that gave the genus it’s name (Lactuca derives from the Latin ‘lac’ or milk). Modern forms are mild-flavored and tender.

 

#58Z2 :: Apium graveolens (Celery)

Apium graveolens, Celery, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Celery is a succulent-stemmed biennial in the Umbelliferae native to Eurasia. It has long been cultivated in Europe; our word celery derives from the ancient Greek selinon. It is mainly grown for it’s succulent stalks and leaves, but tuberous rooted-forms are also known. The flavor of celery survives cooking, making it a popular vegetable for soups and stews. Seeds are used as a spice.

 

#59Z2 :: Nasturtium officinale (Watercress)

Nasturtium officinale, Watercress, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Watercress is an aquatic or semiaquatic plant in the Brassicaceae native to the marshes of Eurasia. As a member of Brassicaceae, is is related to mustard and radish, which share its spicy flavor. Watercress has hollow stems, which give it buoyancy in water, and compound pinnate leaves. Leaves are eaten fresh and the seeds are eaten spouted. The plant is highly nutritious, and has medicinal uses.

 

#60Z2 :: Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla (Chard)

Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla, Chard, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic food

Chard is a leafy green vegetable in the Chenopodiaceae, and is conspecific with beets (it is a non-tuberous beet). The tender young greens are eaten fresh; older leaves and stalks are cooked, which reduces their bitterness. Leaves and stems are highly nutritious, especially in vitamins A & K. Many varieties have pigmented stalks. Plants produce new stalks and leaves throughout the season.

#61Z2 :: Capsicum  (Peppers)

Capsicum, peppers, aquapini planting, aquapini food, Highest Good food, walipinis, organic foodCapsicum is a genus of 38 species in the Solanaceae, native to warm regions of the Americas. Their fruits are called “peppers” although they are not closely related to the true pepper of the Piperaceae. Capsicum fruits are rich in carotenoids, vitamins, and capsaicin, which gives them their hot spicy flavor. Plants are short-lived perennials usually grown as annuals. Thousands of varieties are known, ranging widely in their degree of heat.

 

ZENAPINI 2 PURCHASING DETAILS

The following is a list of the retail purchasing price of all the plants that will be planted in Zenapini #2. We are currently seeking companies that would like to partner with our 501(c)3 non-profit organization as specific providers of these plants to make duplication by the consumer easier. Visit our Win-Win-Win-Win page to understand our partnering philosophy and our Marketing and Promotional Engine Page for the specifics of how we can support those interested being a part of world change with One Community. These prices are rounded up to the nearest dollar and current as of September 2013.

NUMBER NAME PURCHASED FROM RECEIVED AS PRICE EA QTY TOTAL
#1Z2 Inga fruitlovers.com* Seed $15 1 $15
#2Z2 Inga fruitlovers.com* Seed $15 1 $15
#3Z2 Inga colecionandofrutas.org* Seed $20 1 $20
#4Z2 Inga colecionandofrutas.org* Seed $20 1 $20
#5Z2 Inga colecionandofrutas.org* Seed $20 1 $20
#6Z2 Pindaiba colecionandofrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#7Z2 Rollinia pineislandnursery.com Plant $35 1 $35
#8Z2 Cola heavenly-products.com Plant $50 1 $50
#9Z2 Green sapote pineislandnursery.com Graft $35 1 $35
#10Z2 Incense Tree colecionandafrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#11Z2 Chocolate pineislandnursery.com Plant $35 1 $35
#12Z2 Chuchuhuasi jatunsacha.org Seed $40 1 $40
#13Z2 Mitragyna kadasgarden.com Plant $40 1 $40
#14Z2 Yohimbe shama-australis.com.au Plant $25 1 $25
#15Z2 Dragons Blood jatunsacha.org Seed $40 1 $40
#16Z2 Virola jatunsacha.org Seed $40 1 $40
#17Z2 Cacahuaxochitl waimeavalley.org Seed $50 1 $50
#18Z2 Jaborandi colecionandafrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#19Z2 Congonha colecionandafrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#20Z2 Chacruna  mass spectrum botanicals Plant $13  1 $13
#21Z2 Toucan fruit colecionandafrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#22Z2 Xochinacaztli jatunsacha.org Seed $20 1 $20
#23Z2 Espinheira Santa colecionandofrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#24Z2 Melinjo frankiesnursery.com Plants $15 3 $45
#25Z2 Iboga kadasgarden.com Plants $40 1 $40
#26Z2 Ixbut fincelunanuevalodge.com Seed $40 1 $40
#27Z2 Heteropterys almostedenplants.com Plant $20 1 $20
#28Z2 Alicia kiwiboancaya.net Seed $10 1 $10
#29Z2 Escalera de Mono jatunsacha.org Seed $40 1 $40
#30Z2 Una de Gato fincalunanuevalodge.com Seed $40 1 $40
#31Z2 Suma colecionandafrutas.org Seed $25 1 $25
#32Z2 Martinella waimeavalley.org Seed $40 1 $40
#33Z2 Pariparoba Mansa colecionandafrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#34Z2 Pacaya redlandnursery.com Seedlings $5 30 $150
#35Z2 Cassava floridasurvivalgardening.com Cuttings $35 1 $35
#36Z2 Vasconcellea colecionandafrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#36bZ2 Pixi colecionandafrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#37Z2 Masha-Hiri massspectrumbotanicals.com Plant $6 1 $6
#38Z2 Fittonia glasshouseworks.com Plant $9 3 $27
#39Z2 Guarana fruitlovers.com Seed $20 1 $20
#40Z2 Cabacui colecionandafrutas.org Seed $20 1 $20
#41Z2 Nymphaea waterfordgardens.com Plant $40 3 $120
#42Z2 Water Chestnut massspectrumbotanicals.com Tubers $1 100 $100
#43Z2 Nelumbo waterfordgardens.com Plants $40 3 $120
#44Z2 Victoria regia   victoria seed requests Seed $25 1 $25
#45Z2 Houttuynia richters.com Plants $32 1 $32
#46Z2 Limnophila richters.com Plants $32 1 $32
#47Z2 Gotu Kola richters.com Plants $25 1 $25
#48Z2 Lizards Tail lochnesswatergardens.com Plants $14 1 $14
#49Z2 Griffonia simplicifolia terra-fusca.de Seed $50 1 $50
#50Z2 Banisteriopsis caapi heavenly-products.com  Plants $30 3 $90
#51Z2 Cilantro seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#52Z2 Basil seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#53Z2 Cabbage seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#54Z2 Broccoli seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#55Z2 Cauliflower seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#56Z2 Kale seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#57Z2 Lettuces seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#58Z2 Celery seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#59Z2 Watercress seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#60Z2 Chard seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
#61Z2 Peppers seedsavers.org Seed $25 1 $25
 TOTAL $2134
 PLUS 20%** $427
 GRAND TOTAL $2561

* Two different nurseries are listed here because they offer different species

** 20% is built in for taxes, shipping, and any other unexpected charges or fees.

ATTRACTING POLLINATORS

One Community will operate our own apiary/resident bee colony and then use plants specifically chosen for their ability to attract bees and other pollinators to bring them to our food production structures. Native plants are generally best for bees but heirloom varieties of perennials are good attractants too. Our plan is to first transplant some native species from the property and move them near each of our food structures to see how how they perform as pollinator attractants. The plants shown below can be added if necessary. The south-facing ventilation windows and other vents will also allow entrance of pollinators. To further assist in pollination, the plants and trees we have chosen will offer a succession of flowers that will bloom through the whole growing season and create ongoing habitat beneficial to pollinators.

Listed below are 2 plant lists for bees. One lists native plants, the other cultivated garden plants. They are not an exhaustive listing of suitable plants for all areas so it is recommended that people research which species are local to your area too. A field guide will tell you which species from these lists are local to you. Your local chapter of the Native Plant Society and native plant nurseries are also worthwhile contacts for advice on choosing, obtaining, and caring for local plant species. Bees are basically looking for 2 things when they visit your plants:

  1. Nectar – nectar is loaded with sugars and it’s a bee’s main source of energy
  2. Pollen – pollen provides the balanced diet of proteins and fats

Many popular flower varieties are hybridized for features that are valued by the gardener, like disease resistance, flower size or color and bigger, longer blooms. Unfortunately much hybridization has reduced the production of nectar and pollen and sometimes leaves the resulting plant completely sterile and useless to bees and other pollinators. Another factor is that the amount of nectar secreted is dependent of climate conditions such as temperature, humidity, and moisture in the soil. Here is some advice from the Xerces Society on what to plant to attract more bees to your garden

OUR BASIC STRATEGY FOR ATTRACTING POLLINATORS
  1. Maintain a beehive on the property
  2. We won’t use pesticides: Most pesticides are not selective and kill off the beneficial bugs too.
  3. We will plant local/native plants: Research suggests native plants are four times more attractive to native bees than exotic flowers. They are also usually well adapted to the local growing conditions and can thrive with minimum attention.
  4. We’ve chosen a diversity of flower colors: Bees have good color vision to help them find flowers and the nectar and pollen they offer. We have intentionally chosen flower colors that are especially attractive to bees: blue, purple, violet, white, and yellow.
  5. We are planting flowers in clumps: Flowers clustered into clumps of one species will attract more pollinators than individual plants scattered through the habitat patch. Four feet or more in diameter is recommended and we are adhering to this.
  6. We are including flowers of different shapes: There are four thousand different species of bees in North America, and they are all different sizes, have different tongue lengths, and will feed on different shaped flowers. Consequently, providing a range of flower shapes means more bees can benefit so we have focused on this too.
  7. We will have a diversity of plants flowering all season: Most bee species are generalists, feeding on a range of plants through their life cycle. By having several plant species flowering at once, and a sequence of plants flowering through spring, summer, and fall, we can support a range of bee species that fly at different times of the season.
  8. We will plant where bees will visit: Bees favor sunny spots over shade and need some shelter from strong winds, which makes the Tropical Atrium and aquapini and walipini structures perfect for bees!
PLANTS NATIVE TO THE UNITED STATES FOR ATTRACTING BEES

Local plants will be our first choice to help local bees, native plants are the next best choice. Space is available both inside and outside and will be used as needed for additional planting of both local and native plants to assist with attracting pollinators inside our food structures. Listed below are some of the native plants we will be using that are good sources of nectar or pollen for bee. Both the common and Latin names of the plant genus are given. This list is not exhaustive and we have chosen many other plants good for bees as well. Individual species have not been included because we hope this list will be useful across the U.S. Not all of these genera will have species in your local area, but they do represent plants that will grow in a variety of environments. We recommend using a wildflower guide or contact local nurseries to find your local species.

  • Aster – Aster
  • Black-eyed Susan – Rudbeckia
  • Caltrop – Kallstroemia
  • Creosote bush – Larrea
  • Currant – Ribes
  • Elder – Sambucus
  • Goldenrod – Solidago
  • Huckleberry – Vaccinium
  • Joe-pye weed – Eupatorium
  • Lupine – Lupinus
  • Oregon grape – Berberis
  • Penstemon – Penstemon
  • Purple coneflower – Echinacea
  • Rabbit-brush – Chrysothamnus
  • Rhododendron – Rhododendron
  • Sage – Salvia
  • Scorpion-weed – Phacelia
  • Snowberry – Symphoricarpos
  • Stonecrop – Sedum
  • Sunflower – Helianthus
  • Wild buckwheat – Eriogonum
  • Wild-lilac – Ceanothus
  • Willow – Salix
GARDEN PLANTS FOR BEES

Native plants will create a beautiful garden, but some people prefer “garden” plants. Many garden plants are varieties of native plants, so this list only includes plants from other countries, so called “exotic” plants, and will/can be used as a supplement to the native plant list. As with the native plants, this list is not exhaustive.

  • Basil – Ocimum
  • Cotoneaster – Cotoneaster
  • English lavender – Lavandula
  • Giant hyssop – Agastache
  • Globe thistle – Echinops
  • Hyssop – Hyssopus
  • Marjoram – Origanum
  • Rosemary – Rosmarinus
  • Wallflower – Erysimum
  • Zinnia – Zinnia

"In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model.

You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. That, in essence, is the higher service to which we are all being called."
~ Buckminster Fuller ~