Civilization Lesson Plan

Civilization Lesson Plan

Civilization Mindmap, One Community

Lesson Plan Mindmap for Civilization – Click to Enlarge

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Teaching art, teaching music, teaching dance, teaching painting, teaching drawing, teaching drama, teaching sculpture, teaching needlework, teaching knitting, teaching cooking, teaching creativity, learning art, learning music, learning to paint, learning to sculpt, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school, One Community education, teaching strategies for life, curriculum for life, One Community, transformational education, open source education, free-shared education, eco-education, curriculum for life, strategies of leadership, education for life, transformational education, new paradigm learning, genius training, the ultimate classroom, teaching tools for life, for the highest good of all, Waldorf, Study Technology, Study Tech, Montessori, Reggio, 8 Intelligences, Bloom's Taxonomy, Orff, our children are our future, the future of kids, One Community kids, One Community families, education for life, transformational living, thinking out of the box, learning how to learn - not what to learn, learning to think, using your brain for a change, brainy builderTeaching english, teaching literature, teaching reading, teaching writing, teaching english, teaching sentence structure, teaching storytelling, teaching verbal skills, teaching non-fiction, teaching fiction, teaching creativity, learning writing, learning reading, learning to write, learning to read, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school, One Community education, teaching strategies for life, curriculum for life, One Community, transformational education, open source education, free-shared education, eco-education, curriculum for life, strategies of leadership, education for life, transformational education, new paradigm learning, genius training, the ultimate classroom, teaching tools for life, for the highest good of all, Waldorf, Study Technology, Study Tech, Montessori, Reggio, 8 Intelligences, Bloom's Taxonomy, Orff, our children are our future, the future of kids, One Community kids, One Community families, education for life, transformational living, thinking out of the box, learning how to learn - not what to learn, learning to think, using your brain for a change, brainy builderTeaching health, teaching exercise, teaching vibrant living, teaching nutrition, teaching relaxation, teaching physical activity, teaching how to eat, teaching sports, teaching play, teaching about the body, teaching healthy regimens, learning health, learning exercise, learning vibrant living, learning about nutrition, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community schoolteaching math, teaching arithmetic, teaching algebra, teaching calculous, teaching calculations, teaching geometry, teaching trigonometry, teaching architecture, teaching engineering, teaching addition, teaching subtraction, learning math, learning arithmetic, learning algebra, learning calculous, learning calculations, learning geometry, learning trigonometry, learning architecture, learning engineering, learning addition, learning subtraction, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community schoolteaching science, teaching chemistry, teaching biology, teaching about plants, teaching about animals, teaching about space, teaching geology, teaching astronomy, teaching earth science, teaching physical science, teaching oceanography, teaching meteorology, teaching zoology, teaching human biology, teaching botany, systems theory, learning science, learning chemistry, learning biology, learning about plants, learning about animals, learning about space, learning geology, learning astronomy, learning earth science, learning physical science, learning oceanography, learning meteorology, learning zoology, learning human biology, learning botany, systems theory, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community schooltechnology, innovation, robotics, the science of learning, learning to learn, learning how to learn, computers, programming, codingteaching social science, teaching social sciences, teaching anthropology, teaching economics, teaching geography, teaching history, teaching law, teaching linguistics, teaching foreign language, teaching psychology, teaching sociology, teaching social research, learning social science, learning social sciences, learning anthropology, learning economics, learning geography, learning history, learning law, learning linguistics, learning foreign language, learning psychology, learning sociology, learning social research, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community schoolteaching human values, teaching abundance, teaching acceptance, teaching accomplishment, teaching achievement, teaching care, teaching awareness, teaching balance, teaching belonging, teaching bravery, teaching brilliance, teaching compassion, teaching connection, teaching confidence, teaching cooperation, teaching collaboration, teaching discovery, teaching efficiency, teaching expressiveness, teaching fairness, teaching love, teaching exploration, teaching flexibility, teaching For The Highest Good of All, teaching fun, teaching giving, teaching grace, teaching growth, teaching harmony, teaching helpfulness, teaching honesty, teaching imagination, teaching joy, teaching modesty, teaching mindfulness, teaching peace, teaching precision, teaching reason, teaching reflection, teaching reliability, teaching self-control, teaching, thoughtfulness, teaching trustworthiness, teaching unity, teaching valor, teaching wonder, learning human values, learning abundance, learning acceptance, learning accomplishment, learning achievement, learning care, learning awareness, learning balance, learning belonging, learning bravery, learning brilliance, learning compassion, learning connection, learning confidence, learning cooperation, learning collaboration, learning discovery, learning efficiency, learning expressiveness, learning fairness, learning love, learning exploration, learning flexibility, learning For The Highest Good of All, learning fun, learning giving, learning grace, learning growth, learning harmony, learning helpfulness, learning honesty, learning imagination, learning joy, learning modesty, learning mindfulness, learning peace, learning precision, learning reason, learning reflection, learning reliability, learning self-control, learning, thoughtfulness, learning trustworthiness, learning unity, learning valor, learning wonder, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school

CIVILIZATION LESSON PLAN

This page is a free-shared lesson plan archive for teaching all educational subjects within the context and theme of “Civilization”. It is purposed for use in community education environments, homeschool environments, traditional schooling environments, or as a supplemental and fun addition to any education program. As part of the complete Education for Life Program, this lesson plan is specifically designed to work in conjunction with the other components: Foundations of Teaching, Curriculum, Teaching Strategies, Learning Tools and Toys, Evaluation Model, and The Ultimate Classroom. If you’d like to learn how all these components work together, click hereClick here for the specifics focused on just using the lesson plans:

CLICK HERE FOR A DETAILED TUTORIAL ON HOW TO USE THIS LESSON PLAN

NOTE: The colors are provided as a possible linear progression (red/easiest to violet/most challenging) for people that might prefer a more linear structure. Our core philosophy, however, is that through creativity every color can be made easy or challenging for any learning level.

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EDUCATION OVERVIEW   ●   HOW TO USE THIS COMPONENT   ●   OUR OPEN SOURCE PURPOSE

One Community school, One Community education, teaching strategies for life, curriculum for life, One Community, transformational education, open source education, free-shared education, eco-education, curriculum for life, strategies of leadership, the ultimate classroom, teaching tools for life, for the highest good of all, Waldorf, Study Technology, Study Tech, Montessori, Reggio, 8 Intelligences, Bloom's Taxonomy, Orff, our children are our future, the future of kids, One Community kids, One Community families, education for life, transformational livingOne Community school, One Community education, teaching strategies for life, curriculum for life, One Community, transformational education, open source education, free-shared education, eco-education, curriculum for life, strategies of leadership, education for life, transformational education, new paradigm learning, genius training, the ultimate classroom, teaching tools for life, for the highest good of all, Waldorf, Study Technology, Study Tech, Montessori, Reggio, 8 Intelligences, Bloom's Taxonomy, Orff, our children are our future, the future of kids, One Community kids, One Community families, education for life, transformational living, thinking out of the box, learning how to learn - not what to learn, learning to think, using your brain for a change, brainy builderOne Community school, One Community education, teaching strategies for life, curriculum for life, One Community, transformational education, open source education, free-shared education, eco-education, curriculum for life, strategies of leadership, the ultimate classroom, teaching tools for life, for the highest good of all, Waldorf, Montessori, Reggio, 8 intelligences, Bloom's Taxonomy, Orff, our children are our future, the future of kids, One Community kids, One Community families, education for life, transformational livingOne Community school, One Community education, teaching strategies for life, curriculum for life, One Community, transformational education, open source education, free-shared education, eco-education, curriculum for life, strategies of leadership, education for life, transformational education, new paradigm learning, genius training, the ultimate classroom, teaching tools for life, for the highest good of all, Waldorf, Study Technology, Study Tech, Montessori, Reggio, 8 Intelligences, Bloom's Taxonomy, Orff, our children are our future, the future of kids, One Community kids, One Community families, education for life, transformational living, thinking out of the box, learning how to learn - not what to learn, learning to think, using your brain for a change, brainy builderteaching tools, teaching toys, learning tools, learning toys, educational toys, educational tools, toys to learn with, toys to grow with, math toys, science toys, social sciences toys, classroom toys, classroom tools, english toys, art toys, music toys, health toys, writing toys, reading toys, reading toolslesson plans for life, educational lessons, learning for life, teaching for life, educational plans, math lesson plans, science lesson plans, english lesson plans, social sciences lesson plans, art lesson plans, vocational lesson plans, health lesson plans, education templates, education mindmaps, learning mindmaps, Education for Life program, One Community, open source education, Highest Good education, free-shared educationevaluation and evolution, learning for life, growing as individuals, evolving education, One Community school, One Community education, teaching strategies for life, curriculum for life, One Community, transformational education, open source education, free-shared education, eco-education, curriculum for life, strategies of leadership, the ultimate classroom, teaching tools for life, for the highest good of all, Waldorf, Study Technology, Study Tech, Montessori, Reggio, 8 Intelligences, Bloom's Taxonomy, Orff, our children are our future, the future of kids, One Community kids, One Community families, education for life, transformational living, Highest Good education, One Communitythe ultimate classroom, One Community Kids, enlightened children, children of the future, conscious kids, conscientious kids, kid leaders, leadership and children, children leading the world, sustainable education, Highest Good education, One Communityeducation licensing, classroom licensing, home school licensing, charter school licensing, pilot school licensing, private school licensing, open source education, educational licensingHighest Good society, education for life, Highest Good education, fulfilled living, enriched life, enriching life, living to live, how to live an enriched life, keeping it all running, sustainable living, social architecture, fulfilled living, thriving, thrivability, emotional sustainability, the good life, a new way to live
WAYS TO CONTRIBUTE TO EVOLVING THIS EDUCATION PROGRAM WITH US

SUGGESTIONS     ●     CONSULTING     ●     MEMBERSHIP     ●     OTHER OPTIONS

A NOTE ABOUT ALL ONE COMMUNITY LESSON PLANS

The One Community lesson plans are intentionally designed for use in ANY educational environment and with ALL educational, cultural, religious/spiritual, and philosophical approaches to teaching and learning. They are designed without an ideological approach and specifically so they can be adapted to include the views, preferences, methodologies, and/or ideologies preferred by different parents and teachers.

For maximum flexibility and adaptation, they are also designed to be combined to teach multiple subjects at the same time. Doing this increases the creativity, effectiveness, and fun of your learning environment. Once we are on the property and operating our version of the complete school and Education for Life program, we will be adding video examples of how to combine the lessons. In the meantime, visit the Teaching Strategies page for a list of suggestions. 

ARTS AND TRADES

CLICK HERE FOR THE COMPLETE SUBJECT OUTLINE FOR ARTS & TRADES

Teaching art, teaching music, teaching dance, teaching painting, teaching drawing, teaching drama, teaching sculpture, teaching needlework, teaching knitting, teaching cooking, teaching creativity, learning art, learning music, learning to paint, learning to sculpt, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school, One Community education, teaching strategies for life, curriculum for life, One Community, transformational education, open source education, free-shared education, eco-education, curriculum for life, strategies of leadership, education for life, transformational education, new paradigm learning, genius training, the ultimate classroom, teaching tools for life, for the highest good of all, Waldorf, Study Technology, Study Tech, Montessori, Reggio, 8 Intelligences, Bloom's Taxonomy, Orff, our children are our future, the future of kids, One Community kids, One Community families, education for life, transformational living, thinking out of the box, learning how to learn - not what to learn, learning to think, using your brain for a change, brainy builder
TEACHING ARTS AND TRADES WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF CIVILIZATION

 

 TEACHING ARTS WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF CIVILIZATION, One Community Art from Ancient Civilizations around the World

  • Choose an ancient civilization from a different continent. Go online and find an art piece you like. Have it printed out in black-and-white and in outline-only mode. Then color it in with crayons, paints or whatever medium you like.*
  • Choose an ancient civilization from a different continent. Go online and find some examples of art from this ancient civilization. Create a collage* or other visual representation using some of the examples you find.
  • Choose an ancient civilization and look for a piece of art that you would like to try to replicate or reinterpret. Then make your new piece of art*, being careful to give credit to the original tradition and avoid cultural appropriation.
  • Choose a piece of art from an ancient civilization to study in depth, view it at a museum, if possible. Create detailed sketches* and explore the historical and artistic context of this piece. What is the story behind the piece? Try to convey this story to others with your sketches* and other materials.
  • Choose two ancient civilizations, both from different continents. Research and create a piece of pottery* that incorporates visuals from both traditions and explain your choice of traditions, techniques/materials used. Be sure to give credit to the original tradition and avoid cultural appropriation.
  • Choose one ancient civilization from each continent and create a visual series* displaying artistic themes that can be found in those civilizations. Take care to explore and document any marked similarities. Account for these. Include explanations to allow others to understand your series.
  • Choose at least three ancient civilizations, then view their art. What problems (social, environmental…) are documented in their artwork, and the solutions? Think of ways in which this ancient knowledge could benefit community builders and others today. Write a well-researched essay*, and after completion create a set of postcards* that could be used to share your findings with others.

Art from Modern Civilizations around the World

For each bullet above, to instead study modern civilization, either replace the study of an ancient civilization with a modern civilization or do a comparison between the ancient and modern version within the same geographic location and/or culture.

 Teaching Trades within the context of civilization, Trades Classes, One Community Trades in Ancient Civilizations

  • Research some clothing and/or patterns from an ancient civilization of your choice. Draw a picture* of the piece you would like to wear.
  • Choose one ancient civilization and explore the jewelery they wore. Using what you have learned as inspiration, create your own jewelery piece* using materials of your choice.
  • Choose one ancient civilization and explore the make-up used in their art. Try to recreate this look using make-up, on either yourself or another person. Take a photo and share this with others, being careful to respect the tradition from which the look was derived and avoid cultural appropriation.
  • Choose at least one ancient civilization from a different continent and explore their textiles. What materials were used and how? Create your own bag* or piece* displaying what you have learned.
  • Choose at least one ancient civilization from a different continent and explore their architecture. What are the similarities and differences from modern architecture? Create your own renderings* (by hand or by computer) of a wall or piece from that civilization.
  • Choose at least two ancient civilizations and explore their views of crime and how to prevent crimes from being committed. Write a well-researched essay* comparing these paradigms to one another and to the legal paradigm currently used in your country.
  • Choose an ancient civilization and explore the traditional medicinal knowledge that has been passed on. How does their view of various illnesses, mental issues, nature and other things different from Western medicine? How could people today benefit from their paradigms and knowledge? If possible, interview a modern-day practitioner of such traditional practice, and if you have interest try to receive some treatment and document your experience. Share your knowledge with others in a workshop.*

Modern Civilizations
For each bullet above, to study modern civilization instead of ancient, either replace the study of an ancient civilization with a modern civilization or do a comparison between the ancient and modern version within the same geographic location and/or culture.

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* Please note that anything with an asterisk is just a suggestion. The diversity of options with asterisks are interchangeable and purposed to stimulate your own ideas. Any one of these suggestions could be replaced with a written paper, any form of art project (drawing, painting, music, paper mache, clay, wood, knitting/embroidery, metals, etc. etc.), an experiment, a presentation, a mindmap, a computer program, a web design project, a piece of poetry or a song, an interpretive dance or play, a group project, or anything else. What we feel is most important is that both the Learner and the Teacher agree on an exercise/activity they both feel would be maximally engaging, fun, and effective. If you come up with an idea we haven’t already thought of, please share it with us.

 

ENGLISH

CLICK HERE FOR THE COMPLETE SUBJECT OUTLINE FOR ENGLISH

Note: Any language can be substituted for English. The subject is listed here as “English” because that is the primary language of most of the people on the team, and the official language of the country we’re building our initial location in.  

Teaching english, teaching literature, teaching reading, teaching writing, teaching english, teaching sentence structure, teaching storytelling, teaching verbal skills, teaching non-fiction, teaching fiction, teaching creativity, learning writing, learning reading, learning to write, learning to read, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school, One Community education, teaching strategies for life, curriculum for life, One Community, transformational education, open source education, free-shared education, eco-education, curriculum for life, strategies of leadership, education for life, transformational education, new paradigm learning, genius training, the ultimate classroom, teaching tools for life, for the highest good of all, Waldorf, Study Technology, Study Tech, Montessori, Reggio, 8 Intelligences, Bloom's Taxonomy, Orff, our children are our future, the future of kids, One Community kids, One Community families, education for life, transformational living, thinking out of the box, learning how to learn - not what to learn, learning to think, using your brain for a change, brainy builder
TEACHING ENGLISH WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF CIVILIZATION

 Teaching English within the context of civilization, English Classes, One Community English (General)

  • With the help of the internet or library, create a 5-paged picture book about an ancient civilization. On each page, write at least one sentence.
  • Choose a specific time in history and imagine living in a specific ancient civilization. Write a short story* about your experience in that ancient civilization, for example, by being transported back via a time machine or in a dream?
  • Choose a work of art depicting a specific time in history in a specific civilization from a different continent. Using this work of art as inspiration and carrying out additional contextual research if necessary, write a poem* of any type.
  • Write an essay* comparing and contrasting what Plato’s Timaeus and Critias plus another book about Atlantis Mythology (or a similar mythological lost city) have to say about lost civilizations. Include your opinions and thoughts.
  • Write a book review* about The Great Voyages of Zheng He, The Odyssey or Iliad, The Aneid, The Travels of Ibn Battuta, Tales of Ancient Egypt or another work of literature about ancient civilizations. Note the historical and cultural context in which the work was written by the author and what information about ancient civilizations you find interesting.
  • Read Beowulf or another work of literature in Old English. Create a presentation* which summarizes the storyline and explores the Old English language, including the historical context in which Old English developed and evolved.
  • Write an in depth research paper about the various mediums that civilizations used across time to capture and spread their literature and how/why they changed over time and how that medium affected their ability to pass on knowledge and or culture. If focusing on a single region, place additional focus on explaining how the stories themselves evolved over time throughout that particular civilization.
  • Create a col legeor university leveled lecture* about Old English versus Middle English. Include in the discussion at least one work from each of the types of English literature as well as the historical, linguistic and cultural context in which such literature developed.
 Teaching Linguistics within the context of civilization, Linguistics Classes, One Community Linguistics- Introduction to Languages Across Civilizations

  • Choose one language that uses the Latin alphabet and locate either an online dictionary or one available at the library. Flip through the dictionary to find at least five words you recognize from your knowledge of the English language. This is an exercise you can do together with an adult. Make a list of these words and share them with others.
  • Using your English-language dictionary or knowledge of the English language, make a list of at least ten loanwords from other languages. Using an online translator or dictionary, or a hard copy at the library, find out what those words actually mean in the original language. Are the meanings the same as in English?
  • Choose another language, and using a dictionary or translator, make a list of at least 20 loanwords that were borrowed from the English language. Write a short piece* explaining the historical and social context in which such words were borrowed.
  • Write an exploratory piece about some differences between the English language used in at least two different places (e.g. Singapore, South Africa, Canada, United States, Australia, New Zealand, Great Britain) and explanations about why these differences exist.
  • Write an essay* exploring the link between Celtic languages and the English language.
  • Create a presentation* exploring the link between various languages, dialects and accents which exist in Great Britain. Include the historical context in the explanation.
  • Write a university level paper* on how various civilizations have influenced the development of the English language (vocabulary, word usage, grammar) providing concrete examples along with their historical contexts.
CLICK HERE TO EMAIL US IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA TO ADD TO THIS SECTION

* Please note that anything with an asterisk is just a suggestion. The diversity of options with asterisks are interchangeable and purposed to stimulate your own ideas. Any one of these suggestions could be replaced with a written paper, any form of art project (drawing, painting, music, paper mache, clay, wood, knitting/embroidery, metals, etc. etc.), an experiment, a presentation, a mindmap, a computer program, a web design project, a piece of poetry or a song, an interpretive dance or play, a group project, or anything else. What we feel is most important is that both the Learner and the Teacher agree on an exercise/activity they both feel would be maximally engaging, fun, and effective. If you come up with an idea we haven’t already thought of, please share it with us.

 

HEALTH

CLICK HERE FOR THE COMPLETE SUBJECT OUTLINE FOR HEALTH

Teaching health, teaching exercise, teaching vibrant living, teaching nutrition, teaching relaxation, teaching physical activity, teaching how to eat, teaching sports, teaching play, teaching about the body, teaching healthy regimens, learning health, learning exercise, learning vibrant living, learning about nutrition, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school
TEACHING HEALTH WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF CIVILIZATION

 Teaching Health within the context of civilization, Health Classes,One Community
  • Brainstorm with others you know about herbal tea and other plant-based remedies those around you have used, until you have collected at least five. Find out what countries, regions, or cultures those remedies are originally from and make a simple chart* of this information.
  • Label a blank map of the world using traditional, plant-based remedies from various regions. Using the Internet, the library and those you know as resources for this project. Try to have at least 20 labels.
  • Write an essay exploring the Roman system of public health and how this has affected the current system your are familiar with.
  • Write an essay about ancient hospital-based systems (e.g. Greek, Byzantine) and what alternatives existed alongside those systems.
  • Write a paper* about the historical exchange of medical knowledge (remedies, instruments, techniques, etc.) between ancient cultures, such as Egypt and Persia, China and South Asian countries.
  • Read the novel The Physician by Noah Gordon, and watch the German film based on it. Write a review piece on the historical accuracy, or lack there of, of the novel and the film.
  • Write a university-level paper exploring the contributions health systems from other civilizations (e.g. Ayurvedic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, folk medicine of Brazil, traditional medicine in various African countries) have made to modern, Western medicine, the recognition these traditional health systems are now receiving from some in the scientific community and the promises some believe these systems hold towards curing multiple ailments.
CLICK HERE TO EMAIL US IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA TO ADD TO THIS SECTION

* Please note that anything with an asterisk is just a suggestion. The diversity of options with asterisks are interchangeable and purposed to stimulate your own ideas. Any one of these suggestions could be replaced with a written paper, any form of art project (drawing, painting, music, paper mache, clay, wood, knitting/embroidery, metals, etc. etc.), an experiment, a presentation, a mindmap, a computer program, a web design project, a piece of poetry or a song, an interpretive dance or play, a group project, or anything else. What we feel is most important is that both the Learner and the Teacher agree on an exercise/activity they both feel would be maximally engaging, fun, and effective. If you come up with an idea we haven’t already thought of, please share it with us.

 

MATH

CLICK HERE FOR THE COMPLETE SUBJECT OUTLINE FOR MATH

teaching math, teaching arithmetic, teaching algebra, teaching calculous, teaching calculations, teaching geometry, teaching trigonometry, teaching architecture, teaching engineering, teaching addition, teaching subtraction, learning math, learning arithmetic, learning algebra, learning calculous, learning calculations, learning geometry, learning trigonometry, learning architecture, learning engineering, learning addition, learning subtraction, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school
TEACHING MATH WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF CIVILIZATION

 Teaching Math within the context of civilization, Math Classes, One Community
  • Find out what the Arabic numbers 1 to 10 are in a the system of a different civilization (e.g. Chinese, Mayan, Greek, Babylonian, Roman). Share this information with others.
  • The number 0 (zero) originated in India and was introduced by the Arabic system, although the Mayans also used it. Imagine if you were to carry out mathematical operations without the number zero and compile a list* of examples of things you could not do without this number.
  • Compile a list of 10 mathematical artifacts from various ancient civilizations, including the Ishango bone, and describe their usage.
  • The Yoruba system, developed in what is now known as Nigeria, was based on units of 20 instead of 10. Do some research on the system and show some mathematical operations, comparing them with operations we use in our current system based on 10s.
  • Babylonian mathematics used a numeral system with the base of 60 instead of 10. Using a word cloud*, brainstorm some things you know are still counted in 60s and then look online or at a book in the library to see if there are any that you did not know about.
  • Using online and/or in library tools, explore the metric systems used by at least one ancient civilization of your choice and compare it to the system used today. Create a visual aid* to display this information and compare it to the system others chose to study.
  • Using online and/or in library tools, explore the time-telling systems used by at least one ancient civilization of your choice and compare it to the system used today. Create a visual aid* to display this information and compare it to the system others chose to study.
  • Where does the word algebra come from? Explore the story of Ibn al-Haytham and the “Alhazen problem”. Create a visual aid.*
  • Choose one ancient civilization and make a poster presentation* showing its mathematical system and contributions to the system used today.
  • Choose two civilizations and compare/contrast their use of mathematics in the architecture of well-known monuments (e.g. pyramids from different civilizations, such as the Meroitic King Amanikhabali’s pyramid). Write an essay.*
  • Various civilizations have looked to the stars, planets and the moon, and used mathematics to interpret their movements for navigational purposes. Choose one system to focus on, or select at least two to compare and contrast, and create a first-year college- or university- level lecture or workshop.*
CLICK HERE TO EMAIL US IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA TO ADD TO THIS SECTION

* Please note that anything with an asterisk is just a suggestion. The diversity of options with asterisks are interchangeable and purposed to stimulate your own ideas. Any one of these suggestions could be replaced with a written paper, any form of art project (drawing, painting, music, paper mache, clay, wood, knitting/embroidery, metals, etc. etc.), an experiment, a presentation, a mindmap, a computer program, a web design project, a piece of poetry or a song, an interpretive dance or play, a group project, or anything else. What we feel is most important is that both the Learner and the Teacher agree on an exercise/activity they both feel would be maximally engaging, fun, and effective. If you come up with an idea we haven’t already thought of, please share it with us.

 

SCIENCE

CLICK HERE FOR THE COMPLETE SUBJECT OUTLINE FOR SCIENCE

teaching science, teaching chemistry, teaching biology, teaching about plants, teaching about animals, teaching about space, teaching geology, teaching astronomy, teaching earth science, teaching physical science, teaching oceanography, teaching meteorology, teaching zoology, teaching human biology, teaching botany, systems theory, learning science, learning chemistry, learning biology, learning about plants, learning about animals, learning about space, learning geology, learning astronomy, learning earth science, learning physical science, learning oceanography, learning meteorology, learning zoology, learning human biology, learning botany, systems theory, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school
TEACHING SCIENCE WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF CIVILIZATION

 Teaching Life Science within the context of civilization, Life Science Classes,One Community Life Sciences

  • Where does the word Biology come from? Brainstorm some ideas and then find out which one is correct using online or library tools.
  • What is the Original Chinese Copper Man? Using an illustration based on the Original Chinese Copper Man and a modern resource on human anatomy, locate at least five points and describe what internal organs or structures they correspond with. (Option: Each member of a group can choose one area of the body and then share their results with the others carrying out the exercise.)
  • Explore some farming techniques of two ancient civilizations of your choice and describe what these techniques showed about their knowledge of life sciences (e.g. Incan method “the Three Sisters”).
  • Using online or in library resources, find out about the ancient Egyptian practice of mummification. Show what it reveals about their knowledge of the human anatomy and plant properties. Create a visual aid.*
  • Find out about how Galen of ancient Greece depicted the human anatomy, and compare this to the Ayuredic system and its Three Humors. Create a visual aid.*
  • Using the following article as a starting point, explore ancient botanical knowledge, including medicinal uses for specific plants. Create a poster presentation.* Article: Van Sertima, I. (1983) “The Lost Sciences of Africa: An Overview.” Blacks in Science: Ancient and Modern, pp. 7-26
  • Explore the botanical and zoological knowledge preserved by Assyrians and Babylonians. Write an essay.*
  • Explore what ancient Chinese civilization knew about silkworms, insects in general and biological control. Write an essay.*
  • Write a report* exploring the biological knowledge of Avicenna.
  • Write a report* exploring Anatomy in Ancient China, including its relationship to acupuncture points and current knowledge of the human anatomy.
  • Compare the knowledge of the human anatomy of at least two ancient civilizations. Create an online lesson for first-year college or university level students.
 TEACHING Physical Science WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF CIVILIZATION, Physical Science Classes, One Community Physical Sciences

  • Where does the word Chemistry come from? Brainstorm some possibilities before checking the Internet and/or library resources to find an answer.
  • Choose an ancient civilization (e.g. Greek, Indian, Mayan and Chinese) and find what they believed in regards to the primary elements. Create a table* and compare and contrast with the results of others who chose different civilizations.
  • Choose an ancient civilization and find out what they did not believe about the stars (e.g. Greek, Indian, Mayan and Chinese). Create a table* and compare and contrast with the results of others who chose different civilizations.
  • The extraction of metals, and the mixtures that make paints or dyes are both examples of the knowledge of chemistry in ancient civilizations. Compile a list* of 5 examples (e.g. Blombos Cave in South Africa), including what specific knowledge of chemistry would have been needed to create these examples.
  • Compile a list* of 10 chemical apparatus from various ancient civilizations (e.g. ancient Mesopotamia), and compare these with some equipment used in chemistry today.
  • Compare the lunar, solar and stellar calendar systems, including examples of which civilizations used or still use. In your comparisons use examples of specific holidays in your chosen civilizations and how their dates are determined. Possible examples should include but are not limited to: Swahili, Ethiopian, Chinese and Mayan. After the comparisons are completed create a presentation*.
  • Read and write a well-researched review of Vedic Physics by Raja Ram Bohan Roy.
  • Explore Ibn al-Haytham and his contribution to optics and physics. One possible aspect for exploration includes comparing the date of his findings with dates of similar findings in modern Western science. Create a presentation* for first-year university- or college students.
 Teaching Earth Science within the context of civilization,Earth Science Classes, One Community Earth Sciences

  • Choose a constellation to draw, and label the stars within that constellation. With the help of an adult, use the Internet to find what ancient civilizations had a constellation similar to the one you chose (in the same location). Share this with others.
  • The creation of rock tools, such as arrowheads, shows ancient knowledge of geology. Compile a list of 5 examples of such ancient articles from various civilizations, including the materials and techniques used and what these.
  • Various ancient civilizations have recorded the existence of various comets, planets, stars, constellations and supernovas. Using the Internet or library resources, compile a list of ten of these heavenly bodies, including drawings from chosen ancient civilizations, if possible, and compare them with current photos from telescopes, etc.
  • Choose an ancient civilization which near a sea or ocean and explore some of their knowledge of oceanography (e.g. Polynesians, Phoenicians). Create a visual aid*.
  • Write an essay* on the astronomical knowledge of the Dogon people, in what is now known as Mali, comparing and contrasting it with modern astronomy.
  • Research and write a detailed paper* based on Astronomical Code of the Rgveda by Subhash Kak.
  • Research and write a detailed essay* based on what Neugebauer’s research reveals about Mesopotamian astronomy.
  • In a well-researched thesis level paper*, compare and contrast at least two astronomical systems developed in ancient civilizations (eg. Mayan, Timbuktu).
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* Please note that anything with an asterisk is just a suggestion. The diversity of options with asterisks are interchangeable and purposed to stimulate your own ideas. Any one of these suggestions could be replaced with a written paper, any form of art project (drawing, painting, music, paper mache, clay, wood, knitting/embroidery, metals, etc. etc.), an experiment, a presentation, a mindmap, a computer program, a web design project, a piece of poetry or a song, an interpretive dance or play, a group project, or anything else. What we feel is most important is that both the Learner and the Teacher agree on an exercise/activity they both feel would be maximally engaging, fun, and effective. If you come up with an idea we haven’t already thought of, please share it with us.

 

SOCIAL SCIENCES

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teaching social science, teaching social sciences, teaching anthropology, teaching economics, teaching geography, teaching history, teaching law, teaching linguistics, teaching foreign language, teaching psychology, teaching sociology, teaching social research, learning social science, learning social sciences, learning anthropology, learning economics, learning geography, learning history, learning law, learning linguistics, learning foreign language, learning psychology, learning sociology, learning social research, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school
TEACHING SOCIAL SCIENCES WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF CIVILIZATION

 TEACHING Social Science WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF CIVILIZATION, Social Science Classes, One Community
  • Ask five people you know to name an ancient civilization they know about and create a word cloud*. Compare this with the word cloud of others to create a larger group/class word cloud* if possible.
  • Explore why and how many ancient Greek texts survive only in Arabic. Make a table* and include some important examples, and if possible, some content from these examples. If you would like, also find other examples of written works’ being preserved in a language different from the original.
  • Choose an ancient civilization and explore its rise/fall in a presentation* then compare it with others.
  • Research at least one civilization or peoples who were incorrectly described as “barbaric” by colonizers (or their land as “barren”, etc.) and describe what this civilization or peoples was actually like. Create a presentation* and, if possible, compare this with others who studied other civilizations or peoples. Discuss whether or not this phenomenon of colonizers minimizing the colonized still happens now.
  • Choose one conflict between at least two different ancient civilizations and at least one book or work of literature from both of the opposing sides which depict such conflict. In an essay*, compare and contrast how the works portray the conflict and the actors involved.
  • Read Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies or Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed (or both if you’d like). Then write a well-researched review*, including other possible theories and your views.
  • Write a well-researched essay* concerning the exchange of knowledge between various ancient civilizations of your choice, in either a specific area(s) that interests you or in general. Include in your work some of the major geographical centers or institutions for this exchange of knowledge.
  • Write a well-researched essay* on how colonialism impacted a certain civilization(s) and how the leadership of the immigrants portrayed the natives and their prior achievements. In the essay, include how it may be continuing to impact the development of these “post-colonial” lands and/or peoples politically, economically and/or otherwise. If the resulting thesis results in a negative conclusion for those people, postulate possible solutions.
How Humanity and It's Practices Change Over Time Foreign Languages 
(Each of the following is to be completed in the foreign language(s) being studied)

  • Learn words for different civilization-related concepts.
  • Read and write with words for civilization-related concepts.
  • Explore what civilization(s) means to the culture you are studying and its differences to your own culture.
  • Explore & create different types of literature in relation to civilization(s).
  • Compose a new piece of literature about Civilizations.
  • Explore the complete history of and writings about civilization-related words.
  • Write a dissertation level paper on civilization(s) in relation to the country/cutlure you are studying.
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* Please note that anything with an asterisk is just a suggestion. The diversity of options with asterisks are interchangeable and purposed to stimulate your own ideas. Any one of these suggestions could be replaced with a written paper, any form of art project (drawing, painting, music, paper mache, clay, wood, knitting/embroidery, metals, etc. etc.), an experiment, a presentation, a mindmap, a computer program, a web design project, a piece of poetry or a song, an interpretive dance or play, a group project, or anything else. What we feel is most important is that both the Learner and the Teacher agree on an exercise/activity they both feel would be maximally engaging, fun, and effective. If you come up with an idea we haven’t already thought of, please share it with us.

 

TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION

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technology, innovation, robotics, the science of learning, learning to learn, learning how to learn, computers, programming, coding
TEACHING TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF CIVILIZATION

 TEACHING Technology WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF CIVILIZATION, Technology Classes, One Community Technology

  • Using online or in library resources, find a picture or diagram showing one or more pieces of ancient technology (e.g. compass, water clock, the qanat) from various ancient civilizations. Using a picture editing application to augment this picture or diagram to improve the presentation and/or add your own design elements.
  • Create a collage* about at least 5 ancient civilizations that had similar technological inventions to that of our modern times. Briefly include text on these inventions, including their spread or disappearance from and/or reappearance in another civilization.
  • Go around your neighborhood or city to take pictures of at least 10 pictures of technology that you are particularly grateful exist in our present civilization. Create a PowerPoint or other presentation, briefly describing how this technology affects your life personally and our lives in general. Include similar inventions in history/ancient history or items from which these inventions were developed.
  • Create a video montage* of at least 10 ancient artifacts that may point to the possibility of evidence of hi-tech equipment in ancient civilizations (e.g. airplane-shaped pendants from South America). Include voice or subtitles describing these artifacts, expert explanations for what they are and why they exist, and then your personal views.
  • Technology related to the Internet is affecting modern civilization (e.g. email, social networking sites, online gaming, online shopping). Keep a digital diary* over 10 days, using screenshots and other descriptions to track your online usage of these inventions. Include your reflections, in your diary, on how it is affecting your behavior, etc. and human civilization.
  • Investigate how the effects of human technology on the environment have contributed to the rise and decline of various civilizations. Explore various known computer models and create your own model*, either using a pre-existing computer program or creating your own (with the option of using a graphics design software suite to create a visual depiction if this is preferred).
  • Write an essay* on the Kardashev scale and any other scales that measure a civilization’s level of technological advancement. Using a variety of sources, describe this scale, discuss its strength/weaknesses and explore implications on civilization as we know it on Earth. Create an argument about the level of advancement we are currently operating at on earth and how we can most rapidly improve it. Include your own opinion and recommendations for the future of humanity.
 Teaching innovation in the context of civilization, Innovation classes, One Community Innovation

  • Choose one piece of technology from an ancient civilization and make a clay model* of it. Imagine and describe what you would do with it today.
  • Modern technology that keeps us constantly connected via the Internet, smartphones, tablets, etc. may have positive and negative impacts on our civilization. Brainstorm a list of some pros/cons, and then interview 5 other people to hear their views.
  • Social media has undoubtedly impacted our civilization and mental health. Research “Facebook depression” and related topics. Based on your research, brainstorm ways in which you can use social media but avoid the pitfalls. Share your ideas with others.
  • Social media has undoubtedly impacted our civilization, including how we parent and interaction with children. Research the impact of children using tablets and other technology, then go into public spaces to anonymously record at least 10 cases of young children using technology (e.g. at a restaurant). Observe both them and those they are with, before documenting your findings. In a short report*, reflect on these observations, including your opinion how they are impacting children and the future.
  • Research how many people in our civilization report being overwhelmed by modern technology. Interview at least 20 people of different ages to see what their opinions and experiences are, and write a report* documenting and discussing your results, including recommendations.
  • Choose either your mobile phone, tablet and/or computer. Keep a 3-week journal of your usage of said device, calculating how much time is spent in various activities (e.g. communication with others, using photo-editing applications, etc). At the end of these two weeks, reflect on how much time was spent using the device(s), how this time was spent on each activity type, whether or not this impacted your regular life and how and the generalizations you can make on how this technology is impacting our civilization.
  • Research one area of technological innovation that you find interesting and research any past inventions that may have been created that have not come into public use. Find out the reasons why it is not available today and create a new invention that will improve our civilization in some way, and account for any reasons that may have impeded it from productions to ensure its creation and launch. Share this with others for trial, free of charge.
  • Modern computer and Internet technology has offered many conveniences to modern civilization. However, some persons are excluded from this. For example, some elderly people would like to learn how to use computer technology to stay connected with family and friends, use library resources and/or have access to alternative news sources, but do not know how to. Research innovative ways to teach older persons and others to use computers, tablets and/or mobile phones. Give free workshops* or one-on-one lessons* to elderly persons and others via your local community centre, elderly care home, etc.
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* Please note that anything with an asterisk is just a suggestion. The diversity of options with asterisks are interchangeable and purposed to stimulate your own ideas. Any one of these suggestions could be replaced with a written paper, any form of art project (drawing, painting, music, paper mache, clay, wood, knitting/embroidery, metals, etc. etc.), an experiment, a presentation, a mindmap, a computer program, a web design project, a piece of poetry or a song, an interpretive dance or play, a group project, or anything else. What we feel is most important is that both the Learner and the Teacher agree on an exercise/activity they both feel would be maximally engaging, fun, and effective. If you come up with an idea we haven’t already thought of, please share it with us.

 

VALUES

CLICK HERE FOR THE COMPLETE SUBJECT OUTLINE FOR VALUES

teaching human values, teaching abundance, teaching acceptance, teaching accomplishment, teaching achievement, teaching care, teaching awareness, teaching balance, teaching belonging, teaching bravery, teaching brilliance, teaching compassion, teaching connection, teaching confidence, teaching cooperation, teaching collaboration, teaching discovery, teaching efficiency, teaching expressiveness, teaching fairness, teaching love, teaching exploration, teaching flexibility, teaching For The Highest Good of All, teaching fun, teaching giving, teaching grace, teaching growth, teaching harmony, teaching helpfulness, teaching honesty, teaching imagination, teaching joy, teaching modesty, teaching mindfulness, teaching peace, teaching precision, teaching reason, teaching reflection, teaching reliability, teaching self-control, teaching, thoughtfulness, teaching trustworthiness, teaching unity, teaching valor, teaching wonder, learning human values, learning abundance, learning acceptance, learning accomplishment, learning achievement, learning care, learning awareness, learning balance, learning belonging, learning bravery, learning brilliance, learning compassion, learning connection, learning confidence, learning cooperation, learning collaboration, learning discovery, learning efficiency, learning expressiveness, learning fairness, learning love, learning exploration, learning flexibility, learning For The Highest Good of All, learning fun, learning giving, learning grace, learning growth, learning harmony, learning helpfulness, learning honesty, learning imagination, learning joy, learning modesty, learning mindfulness, learning peace, learning precision, learning reason, learning reflection, learning reliability, learning self-control, learning, thoughtfulness, learning trustworthiness, learning unity, learning valor, learning wonder, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school
TEACHING VALUES WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF CIVILIZATION

 Teaching values in the context of civilization, Values Classes, One Community
  • Make a list of 3 values that are important in your culture, and then compare these to values to those in either an ancient civilization of your choice or another modern culture (using the Internet or library resources.)
  • People descended from all different ancient civilizations and cultures should be equally included with a community and neither demeaned nor exotified. Research and brainstorm at least 10 ways in which one should make someone from a different cultural background feel respected but not exotified (e.g. do not attempt to say a Japanese greeting to every person of Asian descent, unless you happen to be living in Japan).
  • Research how the values of at least one ancient civilization contributed to its peoples thriving (e.g. golden ages) and what we can learn from these values.
  • Some textbooks, historical works or works of fiction incorrectly depict various ancient civilizations or peoples in a demeaning way, extending to how their descendants are now portrayed (i.e. racism). Locate 5 examples of these and discuss the historical background of such racial stereotypes and how you can still see such stereotypes today.
  • Imperial expansion and colonialism has played an important role in the growth and decline of civilizations. Write an essay* on the values associated with colonialism and discuss these, using historical examples. Compare and contrast these values with your own and those of the people around you.
  • Compare and contrast at least two ancient civilizations and how their values and worldviews contributed to the betterment of fellow humans. In the same essay*, reflect on your own values and describe your vision/ideal of the future, including values.
  • Create a presentation for school children intended to foster respect for those descended from other ancient civilizations/cultures without orientalism, exotification and cultural appropriation. Do research and include examples of possible everyday scenarios and the appropriate way it would be to react/behave, including when other school children are being bullied for being culturally “different”.
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*Please note that anything with an asterisk is just a suggestion. The diversity of options with asterisks are interchangeable and purposed to stimulate your own ideas. Any one of these suggestions could be replaced with a written paper, any form of art project (drawing, painting, music, paper mache, clay, wood, knitting/embroidery, metals, etc. etc.), an experiment, a presentation, a mindmap, a computer program, a web design project, a piece of poetry or a song, an interpretive dance or play, a group project, or anything else. What we feel is most important is that both the Learner and the Teacher agree on an exercise/activity they both feel would be maximally engaging, fun, and effective. If you come up with an idea we haven’t already thought of, please share it with us.

Civilization lesson plan, one community, teaching civilization, learning civilization

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teaching arts, teaching trades, teaching life skills, teaching building, teaching communication, teaching painting, teaching exploration, teaching rhythm and tempo, teaching tactile skills, teaching learning strategies, teaching storytelling, teaching puppet theatre, teaching planting, teaching crafts, teaching woodworking, teaching metalworking, teaching pottery, teaching theatre, learning arts, learning trades, learning life skills, learning building, learning communication, learning painting, learning exploration, learning rhythm and tempo, learning tactile skills, learning learning strategies, learning storytelling, learning puppet theatre, learning planting, learning crats, learning woodworking, learning metalworking, learning poetry, learning theatre, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school teaching english, teaching literature, teaching sociolinguistics, teaching communications, teaching linguistics, teaching speech etiquette, teaching listening, teaching pronounciation, teaching language, teaching reading, teaching writing, teaching parts of speech, teaching comprehension, teaching speaking, teaching stories, teaching poems, learning english, learning literature, learning sociolinguistics, learning communications, learning linguistics, learning speech etiquette, learning listening, learning pronounciation, learning language, learning reading, learning writing, learning parts of speech, learning comprehension, learning speaking, learning stories, learning poems, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school teaching health, teaching emotional health, teaching mental health, teaching social health, teaching nutrition, teaching spiritual health, teaching physical health, teaching self respect, teaching self awareness, teaching flexibility, teaching fruit, teaching vegetables, teaching grains, teaching ego, teaching connection, teaching intuition, teaching motor skills, teaching fitness, teaching outdoors, learning health, learning emotional health, learning mental health, learning social health, learning nutrition, learning spiritual health, learning physical health, learning self respect, learning self awareness, learning flexibility, learning fruit, learning vegetables, learning grains, learning ego, learning connection, learning intuition, learning motor skills, learning fitness, learning outdoors, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school teaching math, teaching arithmetic, teaching algebra, teaching calculous, teaching calculations, teaching geometry, teaching trigonometry, teaching architecture, teaching engineering, teaching addition, teaching subtraction, learning math, learning arithmetic, learning algebra, learning calculous, learning calculations, learning geometry, learning trigonometry, learning architecture, learning engineering, learning addition, learning subtraction, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school

teaching earth sciences, teaching life sciences, teaching physical sciences, teaching astronomy, teaching states of matter, teaching motion, teaching investigation, teaching energy, teaching vibration, teaching magnetism, learning earth sciences, learning life sciences, learning physical sciences, learning astronomy, learning states of matter, learning motion, learning investigation, learning energy, learning vibration, learning magnetism, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school teaching social sciences, teaching friendship, teaching family, teaching social skills, teaching language, teaching literature, teaching seasons, teaching fine arts, teaching emotions, teaching culture, teaching history, teaching sports, teaching relationships, learning social sciences, learning friendship, learning family, learning social skills, learning language, learning literature, learning seasons, learning fine arts, learning emotions, learning culture, learning history, learning sports, learning relationships, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school teaching innovation, teaching awareness, teaching focus, teaching imagination, teaching strategy, teaching creativity, teaching visualization, teaching technology, teaching basic machines, teaching magnets, teaching gears, teaching coding, teaching app development, teaching design, teaching blueprints, learning innovation, learning awareness, learning focus, learning imagination, learning strategy, learning creativity, learning visualization, learning technology, learning basic machines, learning magnets, learning gears, learning coding, learning app development, learning design, learning blueprints, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school teaching imagination, teaching communication, teaching care, teaching kindness, teaching hygiene, teaching sharing, teaching playfulness, teaching teamwork, learning imagination, learning communication, learning care, learning kindness, learning hygiene, learning sharing, learning playfulness, learning teamwork, the Education for Life Program, creative kids, artistic kids, art in the context of, music in the context of, One Community education, open source education, One Community school

 

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OPEN SOURCE TEACHING METHODOLOGY SUMMARIES

Montessori | Waldorf | Orff | Reggio | Multi-Intelligence | Bloom's Taxonomy | Study Tech | I-WE

 

INDEX OF ALL THE ONE COMMUNITY OPEN SOURCE LESSON PLANS
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Click this image for the Lesson Plans for Life page with links to the rest of the lesson plans

 

THE WORLD'S LARGEST ONLINE FREE EDUCATION RESOURCE ARCHIVE

 

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